December 20, 2010 | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Everyone’s Gone To The Moon

  • The hottest market in the hottest economy in the world is Chinese real estate. The big question is how vulnerable is this market to a crash.

    One red flag is the vast number of vacant homes spread through China, by some estimates up to 64 million vacant homes.

    We’ve tracked down satellite photos of these unnerving places, based on a report from Forensic Asia Limited. They call it a clear sign of a bubble: “There’s city after city full of empty streets and vast government buildings, some in the most inhospitable locations. It is the modern equivalent of building pyramids. With 20 new cities being built every year, we hope to be able to expand our list going forward.”

  • At the end of our tour at Museo Del Jugute Mujam (aka Antique Toy Museum Mexico) I stopped in my tracks, made a “What Th-” face then rubbed my eyes as if “No- it COULDN’T be!”.
    After at least an hour or two of the weird and wacky, comical and cute and kitschy and krazy this construction’s fast 180 turn gave me a ‘lil whiplash.
    What’s extra great about the museum is that they not only have the most amazing collection of crap, they often go the extra step and create artist visions with the toys. This tribute to 9/11 is the most jarring example. The planes and towers are all filled with rubber and plastic heroes to show, well, to show that the creators heart was in the right place.
  • Internet activists point out that these block lists have already been abused in some countries. In Australia, for instance, a government block list — which officials said would be used only to block illegal content — was found to have targeted religious and political websites. The list was even used to block parts of WikiLeaks.

    (Final implementation of the “Great Firewall of Australia” has been delayed until after the 2011 election.)

    Some activists argue that the efforts to protect children are simply a politically palatable way to get the public to accept government control over the Internet.

    However, in the US, government plans to take greater control over Internet content have been focused on copyright protection, rather than children.

  • “Maybe it’s worth reminding people that Wesley Snipes was acquitted of tax fraud and conspiracy charges in 2008. He was only found guilty on misdemeanor charges of ‘willful failure to file an income tax return.’
  • Clement Hunter, 30, who has a history of drug busts, caught the attention of Queens cops patroling in an unmarked car about 4 a.m. because he drove like a driver’s-ed flunkie, police said.

    Smuggling the massive haul of pot in a rented Dodge Caravan, Hunter came to a screeching stop, turned without signaling and blew through a red light at the intersection of Farmers and Merrick Blvds., police said.

    When the cops tried to pull him over, he zoomed off – but his getaway bid was even more pathetic.

    He barely made it three blocks before turning onto a dead-end street.

    “He kind of traps himself,” a police source said of Hunter’s misadventure on 178th St in Springfield Gardens. “The officers basically block him off.”

    He tried to flee on foot, but – you guessed it! – got nowhere.

  • In the late 19th century, as today, a terrorist cabal detonated bombs in the heart of the Western world. Judged by the number of successful attacks on politicians and royalty, that force was more directly threatening to the inner circles of power than today’s radical Islam.

    This episodic violence, loosely associated with the extremist wing of the anarchist movement, lasted roughly from 1880 to 1910. It claimed the lives of only about 150 private citizens but also killed a president, a police chief, a prime minister, a czar, a king, and an empress. Yet the wave of terror eventually receded. No one has lived in mortal fear of bomb-throwing, dagger-clutching anarchists for nearly a century. Will citizens in 2110 view radical Islamic terrorism as a similar historical curiosity, useful mostly for colorful storytelling?

  • A media experiment of feeding live tweets onto giant television screens displayed in the EU summit building had to be switched off after Italian twitterers bombarded the system with attacks on Silvio Berlusconi.
  • Applying the US Espionage Act to third-party publishers of classified information like WikiLeaks would violate protected speech rights, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) told members of the House Judiciary Committee Thursday.

    “If the Espionage Act were to be applied to publishers, it would have the unconstitutional effect of infringing on the constitutionally protected speech rights of all Americans, and it would have a particularly negative effect on investigative journalism – a necessary and fundamental part of our democracy,” the ACLU said in a statement.

  • The officials rules from the Obama Administration, when it comes to Freedom of Information requests, is that the default view should be the transparent one. In practice, we’ve seen exactly the opposite. Studies have shown that the Obama Administration has turned down FOIA requests at a greater rate than the previous administration (which was already pretty damn secretive) and often uses political reasons, rather than genuine secrecy reasons to hide information (for example, claiming ACTA had to be secret for national security reasons).
  • Bangladeshi authorities have launched an investigation after a pornographic film was aired on a large display screen at the country’s main airport, a magistrate says.

    Hundreds of travellers and waiting friends and relatives at the main terminal of the Shahjalal International Airport were shocked as the film was aired for five minutes, magistrate Siddiqa Akhter said.

  • Don’t you hate it when you’re in a meeting or in class, and someone’s having a cellphone conversation right next to you? Or maybe you just want a peaceful ride on the train or bus, but someone with a big mouth keeps talking to his stupid buddy about how he scored majorly with this girl last night? Solution? Just use this ultra powerful and highly effective cell phone cigarette jammer which disablesany cell phone in distance, stopping all signals on the GSM, DCS, PHS, and 3G bands without interrupting any other electronic device. Trust us – this will save your sanity!

    It’s small, portable and cigarette pack shaped so you can place it in any empty regular size cigarette box for maximum camouflage. Or keep it inside your bad, hidden under the seat of your car, anywhere you want and no one will ever know their cellphone signals are being scrambled!

  • NASA Gemini-Era Space Food Pouch: Cheese Sandwich. This rare, unconsumed, unflown space food leftover is likely from the Gemini project. A 5.5″ x 3.5″ x 1″still-sealed plastic pouch with a label on the front: “CHEESE SANDWICH” on which is a “WSD/14” stamp; on the verso is a label with the Serial No. “FG 439. From the estate of a long-time NASA employee. Fine condition but the contents are quite crumbled (and quite unappetizing). Not for consumption.
  • “We’ve undergone a corporate coup d’état in slow motion,” he said. “Our public education system has been gutted. Our infrastructure is corroding and collapsing. Unless we begin to physically resist, they are going to solidify neo-feudalism in this country.”

    “If we think that Obama is bad, watch the next two years because these corporate forces have turned their back on him,” Hedges warned.

    Hedges, author of “Death of the Liberal Class,” said that his vision of America is one with a functioning social democracy, which stands in stark contrast to the nihilism of the corporate state.

    “American workers, as they are repeatedly told, will have to become competitive with prison labor in China,” he said. “That’s where we’re headed, and all the pillars of the liberal establishment are complicit in this.”

  • Nigeria has dropped charges against Dick Cheney, the former US vice-president, over bribery allegations involving the energy giant Halliburton after an out-of-court settlement was agreed.

    Nigeria’s anti-corruption watchdog, the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) said that the charges were dropped on Friday after Halliburton agreed to pay fines totalling up to $250 million over allegations it paid millions of dollars in bribes to Nigerian officials.

  • The Large Hadron Collider took several years to construct, and it was expected that it would take several more to begin yielding game-changing scientific data. But, to the delight of CERN researchers, that hasn’t been the case. The LHC is already yielding reams of valuable scientific data, and a bulletin released by lead researchers Monday indicates that the ATLAS experiment is working so well that researchers should be able to confirm or rule out the existence of the Higgs Boson by next year, and could even find evidence of extra dimensions before the end of 2011.
  • Dr Penrose’s version of events is that the universe did not come into existence at the Big Bang but instead passes through a continuous cycle of aeons. Each aeon starts off with the universe being of zero size and high uniformity. At first the universe becomes less uniform as it evolves and objects form within it. Once enough time has passed, however, all of the matter around will end up being sucked into black holes. As Stephen Hawking has demonstrated, black holes eventually evaporate in a burst of radiation. That process increases uniformity, eventually to the level the universe began with.

    Thus far, Dr Penrose’s version of cosmology more or less matches the standard version. At this point, though, he introduces quite a large kludge of his own. This is the idea that when the universe becomes very old and rarefied, the particles within it lose their mass.

  • Some critics pointed out that Time seems to be behind the times in recognizing Facebook, which exploded as a phenomenon in 2006 and 2007.

    “Time just named its Person of the Year 2007,” Tweeted comedian John Hodgman.

    Some took a more aggressive tone, accusing the magazine of cowardice in picking a less-controversial figure than Assange. Slate editor-in-chief Jacob Weisberg called the decision “gutless.”

  • When asked whether he thought Assange was a hi-tech terrorist or a whistleblower akin to those who released the Pentagon Papers — a series of top-secret documents revealing US military policy in Vietnam — Biden said: “I would argue that it’s closer to being hi-tech terrorist.”
  • “But let us not be hasty, and let us not legislate in a climate of fear or prejudice,” Conyers closed, referring to the calls for new laws criminalizing the actions of Wikileaks. “For, in such an atmosphere, it is our constitutional freedoms and our cherished civil rights that are the first to be sacrificed in the false service of our national security.”
  • CABLESEARCH is an attempt for an user friendly search engine of already published documents from Wikileaks.

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on December 20, 2010

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The Incredible Golden Age Comic Cover Art of L.B. Cole

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“Leonard B. Cole (1918–1995) was a comic book artist who worked during the Golden Age of Comic Books, producing work in various different genres, such as science fiction, romance, horror, adventure, mystery, sports and humor.

Before entering the comic book industry, Cole worked as art director in the lithography industry. His comic book career started in the early 1940s, mainly as a cover artist for titles such as Suspense Comics and Contact Comics. Some of his boldest covers featured what he referred to as “poster colors”, the use of primary colors, often over black backgrounds.” – Wikipedia


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