Vote With A Bullet | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Vote With A Bullet

  • “I would have no idea how to dye an alligator — especially a normal skin-toned alligator in his natural state,” he told AOL News. “Their skin is just so extremely thick that I don’t know how, short of tattooing, you would get it that color.”
  • A student claims Brooklyn College “forcibly” sent her to a mental hospital where she was held for 2 weeks against her will because she complained that there was a hidden camera in her bedroom – which was true. After her 2 weeks of forcible detention in a hospital, she says, the college refused to let her take her final exams, and gave her the boot.
    Chinemerem Eze, an international honor student who has “no history of psychiatric problems,” says she spoke to Brooklyn College security in December 2008 about “potentially criminal activity involving her ex-roommates, and also involving her landlord at the time; specifically plaintiff suspected that she was being defamed on the Internet by her ex-roommates, and that her landlord at the time had installed a hidden camera in her bedroom.”
    Eze says her “suspicion was later confirmed, as a hidden camera was subsequently discovered in her bedroom.”
  • In 2006, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which conducts Internet pornography investigations, produced a list of 5,200 Pentagon employees suspected of viewing child pornography and asked the Pentagon to review it. But the Pentagon checked only about two-thirds of the names, unearthing roughly 300 defense and intelligence employees who allegedly had viewed child pornography on their work or home computers. The defense investigators failed to check an additional 1,700 names on the list. … Any possible criminal action against the 1,700 individuals would probably come too late, because the statute of limitations has probably expired
  • It’s hard to say. When you look at the Internet material he purportedly produced, the first impression you get is that the 22-year-old now in custody for the shooting of 19 people in Tucson was completely out of his mind, or at least mildly deranged. His writings will be virtually impossible for most people to understand, what with his references to unexplained numbers, his fondness for weird syllogisms, his unexplained references and his apparent semi-literacy.

    That said, there are some clues.

  • Authorities said the boy’s parents had trusted Hurst and had considered him to be an important role model for the boy.

    Hurst, authorities alleged, gave the boy an extra $1 in his allowance each time the boy made certain references to the sexual acts.

    During the investigation, text messages were discovered on the boy’s phone that confirmed the inappropriate sexual conversations between Hurst and the boy, according to the arrest affidavit.

    Hurst, according to arrest documents, told authorities “that his cellular phone had a virus and that inappropriate text messages were sent to a former student.”

    Detectives claimed Hurst consented to a search of his personal vehicle and that they uncovered in the passenger glove box three small bags that contained cocaine, according to the arrest affidavit.

  • At the end of 2010, the “open-source” software movement, whose activists tend to be fringe academics and ponytailed computer geeks, found an unusual ally: the Russian government. Vladimir Putin signed a 20-page executive order requiring all public institutions in Russia to replace proprietary software, developed by companies like Microsoft and Adobe, with free open-source alternatives by 2015.

    The move will save billions of dollars in licensing fees, but Mr. Putin’s motives are not strictly economic. In all likelihood, his real fear is that Russia’s growing dependence on proprietary software, especially programs sold by foreign vendors, has immense implications for the country’s national security. Free open-source software, by its nature, is unlikely to feature secret back doors that lead directly to Langley, Va.

  • With a brief reprieve after the ‘90s culture wars, it looks as though the tide is shifting back in the direction of visual art censorship.
  • The phones in many people’s pockets today are miniature personal computers, and they are just as vulnerable as PCs to viruses, malware, and other security problems. But research presented at a conference in Germany last week shows that phones don’t even have to be smart to be vulnerable to hackers.

    Using only Short Message Service (SMS) communications—messages that can be sent between mobile phones—a pair of security researchers were able to force low-end phones to shut down abruptly and knock them off a cellular network. As well as text messages, the SMS protocol can be used to transmit small programs, called “binaries,” that run on a phone. Network operators use these files to, for example, change the settings on a device remotely. The researchers used the same approach to attack phones. They performed their tricks on handsets made by Nokia, LG, Samsung, Motorola, Sony Ericsson, and Micromax, a popular Indian cell-phone manufacturer.

  • If you have been making hit records for the past 10 years you should have zero connection to the mundane criminality of poor people You shouldn’t have to carry your gun. You shouldn’t have to hold your own weed. You should have enough money to hire someone to do all those dumb things. Instead these rappers are hustling backward and winding up in jail as a result. Didn’t they get the memo that the street credibility requirement was only a myth? Sure these artists have made tons of money rapping about their prison lifestyle, but wasn’t that to deter other people from entering jail themselves?
  • Donald Trump, the billionaire property mogul and host of America’s version of ‘The Apprentice’, has told friends he is seriously thinking of running for president.

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