All Cybereyez On You | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

All Cybereyez On You

  • Attack toolkits are software programs that can be used by novices and experts alike to facilitate the launch of widespread attacks on networked computers. These kits enable the attacker to easily launch numerous pre-written threats against computer systems. They also provide the ability to customize threats in order to evade detection, as well as automating the attack process.

    “In the past, hackers had to create their own threats from scratch. This complex process limited the number of attackers to a small pool of highly skilled cybercriminals,” said Stephen Trilling, senior vice president, Symantec Security Technology and Response. “Today’s attack toolkits make it relatively easy for even a malicious novice to launch a cyberattack. As a result, we expect to see even more criminal activity in this area and a higher likelihood that the average user will be victimized.”

  • A Hamburg court is trying to make sense of a pirate attack off the coast of Somalia last April. But even as many hope the trial will produce a precedent for Europe’s approach to high seas crime, the court can’t even figure out how old the suspects are. The challenges to justice are immense.
  • In a talk at the Black Hat DC conference here Tuesday, Tom Parker, a security consultant, presented a compelling case that Stuxnet may be the product of a collaboration between two disparate groups, perhaps a talented group of programmers that produced most of the code and exploits and a less sophisticated group that may have adapted the tool for its eventual use. Parker analyzed the code in Stuxnet and looked at both the quality of the code itself as well as how well it did what it was designed to do, and found several indications that the code itself is not very well done, but was still highly effective on some levels.
  • Well-coordinated cyber attacks around the world could cause a “full-scale global shock” on a huge scale similar to collapsing financial structures, pandemics, long-term pollution and other mega disasters, but the threat of such attacks is currently not very high, according to a study released by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).
  • But, the main issue that remains to be addressed is that of security. Analog surveillance systems were difficult to hack into by people who lacked the adequate knowledge, but IP cameras – having their own IPs – can be quite easily physically located and their stream watched in real-time by anyone who has a modicum of computer knowledge and knows what to search for on Google.

    “Once an IP camera is installed and online, users can access it using its own individual internal or external IP address, or by connecting to its NVR (or both),” explains Connor. “In either case, users need only load a simple browser-based applet (typically Flash, Java, or ActiveX) to view live or recorded video, control cameras, or check their settings.”

  • A stained glass window in a small church has caused a sensation in France. Unveiled in 1941, it depicts Adolf Hitler executing a saint who symbolizes the Jewish people. Local priests have praised the work as a brave act of resistance against the Nazi occupiers.
  • Kratz filed a response today to a suit by Stephanie Van Groll, who claims Kratz violated her constitutional rights when he sent her text messages like: “Are u the kind of girl that likes secret contact with an older married elected DA…the riskier the better? Or do you want to stop right now before any issues?” At the time, Kratz was overseeing Van Groll’s domestic abuse case against her boyfriend. The suit argues that “under Wisconsin law, witnesses have the right to be protected from harm arising out of their cooperation with law enforcement.”

    Kratz’s response argued that he “acted in a manner that was proper, reasonable, lawful and in exercise of good faith and reasonable standards of conduct at all relevant times,” and that “if any injuries were suffered by the Plaintiff, all such injuries and damages were caused by her own conduct, negligence and behavior,” or through that of a third party.

  • Try posting something to LiveJournal about the controversial trial of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, for instance.

    Your LiveJournal account will quickly be struck by a massive bot attack. These bots are nothing like the commercial LiveJournal bots that we’ve discussed before that are quiet, unobtrusive, and pretend to be human.

    The “political” LiveJournal bots post 20 or more huge comments in a row. They don’t bother to disguise their obviously auto-generated usernames, and often comment with inappropriate pictures or jokes.

  • Before he rose to notoriety as the founder of Penthouse magazine, Bob Guccione allegedly wrote letters soliciting customers to buy his dirty photos at the bargain rate of 10 photos for $2 under the pseudonym of “Robert Gucci.”

    That’s just part of what is revealed by the more than sixty pages of FBI records on Guccione obtained by TPM through a Freedom of Information Act request. Guccione died in October at the age of 79.

    Until now, it was widely held that Guccione got into the business in 1964 with the founding of Penthouse. But the new information unveiled in an FBI file from 1964 shows that a “Gucci” who shared an address with Guccione had been under investigation in 1956 for “sending obscene photographs through the mail.”

  • The family of Delvonte Tisdale, the 16-year-old boy who appears to have fallen to his death while stowing away inside the landing gear of a U.S. Airways airliner flying from Charlotte, NC, to Boston, MA, last November, has retained a Florida-based personal injury attorney, Christopher Chestnut, who has suggested that lax airport security contributed to the teenager’s death.

    “We intend to seek justice for a child who, although culpable for making irresponsible and immature decisions representative of his age, should never have successfully gained access to that airplane,” said Chestnut, in a Jan. 18 press release announcing that his Gainesville, FL, law firm, The Chestnut Firm, has been retained by Tisdale’s family.

  • Two delusional patients who believed that friends and relatives had died, despite them being around to prove otherwise, are described in an amazing 2005 journal article from the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

    Although the Cotard delusion is well studied in psychiatry, where patients believe themselves to be dead, the report names the novel belief that another living person has died ‘Odysseus Syndrome’ – after the Greek legend where Penelope continued to believe that Odysseus had died, even after returning home from battle.

  • Facebook has been pushing the boundaries of privacy for a long time, but despite the uproar, few in the community have abandoned the service. It is great news that Facebook is responding to the outrage about this recent change, but I wonder if most users will be satisfied with their eventual solution.

    People are willing to accept the constant evolution of technology, but are not always willing to accept others’ ideas of how their privacy should evolve along with it. While Facebook does alert users to the fact that this information will be shared with others, warning prompts and other pop-ups are so frequent that they are frequently ignored. Users still place a great deal of trust in Facebook, and the service has an obligation to live up to that expectation.

  • Anti-government sentiment is not cause for fear, a sign of insanity, or a precursor of tragedy. Quite the contrary. Anti-government sentiment signifies attentiveness, understanding, and a love of liberty. If you truly value freedom, then you absolutely must distrust and despise government with every fiber of your being. Why? Government has no ability, whatsoever, to give freedom to anyone. Government can only take freedoms away. Our founding fathers fully understood this fundamental truth. They did not view government as a potential source of good, but as a necessary evil. Although they understood that limited government would be necessary to protect individual citizens from each other, they also understood that the Constitution would be necessary to protect all citizens from the government. Our founding fathers knew that if they did not restrain the government with the constitution, then nothing would stop it from taking all of our liberties away.
  • 48% of 18-34 year olds check Facebook when they wake up
    The 35+ Demographic represents 30% of Facebook Users
    71% of the web audience in the US is on Facebook
    70% of Facebook users reside outside of the US
  • A full 17 percent of those ages 18-29 said yes, that violence would be justified, while a further 15 percent were not “not sure.” Granted, while those figures come out to a clear majority of young people — 68 percent — saying violence is not justified, it also means that 32 percent either disagree or haven’t made up their minds.

    Another statistic sure to surprise some beltway liberals were the responses of poor people, who tied with tea partiers at 13 percent in saying violence would be justified. A further 24 percent said they weren’t sure, bringing their level of certainty against violence down to just 63 percent.

    Compounding the potential for civil unrest, the poor and the tea parties, according to prior statistics, were two very different, separate groups with virtually no cross-over.

  • A newly revealed 1997 letter from the Vatican warned Ireland’s Catholic bishops not to report all suspected child-abuse cases to police — a disclosure with the potential to fuel more lawsuits worldwide against the Vatican, which has long denied any involvement in coverups.

    The letter, obtained by Irish broadcasters RTE and provided to The Associated Press, documents the Vatican’s rejection of an Irish church initiative to begin helping police identify pedophile priests.

    The letter’s message undermines persistent Vatican claims that the church never instructed bishops to withhold evidence or suspicion of crimes from police. Instead, the letter emphasizes the church’s right to handle all child-abuse allegations and determine punishments in house rather than hand that power to civil authorities.

  • Though American and Israeli officials refuse to talk publicly about what goes on at Dimona, the operations there, as well as related efforts in the United States, are among the newest and strongest clues suggesting that the virus was designed as an American-Israeli project to sabotage the Iranian program.

    In recent days, the retiring chief of Israel’s Mossad intelligence agency, Meir Dagan, and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton separately announced that they believed Iran’s efforts had been set back by several years. Mrs. Clinton cited American-led sanctions, which have hurt Iran’s ability to buy components and do business around the world.

  • The thing is, the SEC heavily regulates the IPO process, because (officially) it doesn’t want companies to abuse the process, lie to investors, trick them into buying shares in something they don’t understand or that’s really much riskier, etc. We’ve discussed in the past, and years back, VentureBeat had a great article that noted many startups appeared to violate the basics of SEC regulations even in just saying they were raising money from private investors, because just talking about it publicly can be seen as a form of a “public offering.” It seems that Goldman was becoming worried that all of the public scrutiny on this deal was suddenly getting mighty close to being a “public offering” type of situation, in which the SEC could conceivably step in and claim that it needs to follow all of the standard IPO rules — which it had not been doing. Goldman has apparently hoped to keep everything a lot more quiet, but the NY Times broke the story, and then everyone else piled on.
  • The “crack tax” is a name given to the taxes on illegal drugs in Tennessee. The tax, under a law passed by the Tennessee General Assembly in January 2005, is applied to illegal substances including cocaine, marijuana, and moonshine. Drug dealers are required to pay anonymously at the state revenue office, where they receive a stamp to prove their payment. If a drug dealer is arrested without having a stamp, the state would seek the money owed it. 22 other states have drug collection laws similar to the crack tax in Tennessee; the law was based upon that of North Carolina’s.
    Thanks Naw

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