Welcome to Foreclosureland | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Welcome to Foreclosureland

  • Prepare yourself to be floored:
    Google Maps keeps evolving, expanding the ability to drill down into granular detail. The latest updated trick? Mapping foreclosures for sale.
  • But what if criminals aren’t playing the lottery straight? What if they have a method that, like Srivastava’s frequency-of-occurrence trick, can dramatically increase the odds of winning? As Srivastava notes, if organized crime had a system that could identify winning tickets more than 65 percent of the time, then the state-run lottery could be turned into a profitable form of money laundering. “You’ve got to realize that, for people in organized crime, making piles of money is one of their biggest problems,” says Charles Johnston, a supervisory special agent in the organized crime section of the FBI. “If they could find a way to safely launder money without taking too big a loss, then I can guarantee you they’d start doing it in a heartbeat.” There is no direct evidence that criminals are actually using these government-run gambling games to hide their crimes.
  • The US military paid $285 billion over three years to hundreds of military contractors that defrauded the Pentagon over the same stretch of time, a US senator charged Wednesday.
  • A foreign intelligence report says that the control systems of Iran’s Bushehr nuclear plant have been penetrated by a computer worm unleashed last year — and is warning of a possible Chernobyl-like disaster once the site becomes fully operational.
  • Divorced and lonely, Kate Roberts thought her luck had changed when a charming U.S. soldier started chatting to her on a dating website.

    When he told he loved her, she thought it was almost too good to be true. And sadly, it was.

    The ‘soldier’ was in fact a member of a sophisticated Nigerian gang set up to exploit vulnerable women and convince them to hand over money.

  • The next time you’re about to leave a snarky comment on someone’s blog or give up an hour to bid for things you don’t need on eBay, consider this: What you do and the self you create online could be forever changing the person you really are.
    More Video

    The Internet may connect us in unprecedented ways, and it may put more information at our fingertips than ever before. But just as it’s changing how the world works, one psychiatrist says it may be irreparably altering how our personalities develop.

  • Italian researchers who specialize in resolving art mysteries said Wednesday they have discovered the disputed identity of the model for Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa — and claimed he was a man.

    Silvano Vinceti, chairman of the Italian national committee for cultural heritage, said the Florence-born Renaissance artist’s male apprentice and possible lover Salai was the main inspiration for the picture.

    However his claim was immediately disputed by experts at the Louvre in Paris, where the painting is on display.

    Salai, real name Gian Giacomo Caprotti, an effeminate young artist who worked with da Vinci for 25 years, is thought to have served as a model and muse for several of his paintings. The pair had an “ambiguous” relationship and were probably lovers, Vinceti said.

  • I know I keep saying it, but I told you so. The Observer is reporting that, according to its sources, the EPA is likely to agree to cut its current estimate of oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico by BP’s Macondo well that blew out on April 20. BP has officially disputed the government’s estimate, saying that it could be half of the official estimate, citing multiple estimates and lack of actual measurement of the flow. The Observer is reporting that the EPA agrees that estimates are not 100% accurate, signalling the weakness of the government’s position.
  • Kids… they grow up so fast these days. So fast, that Walmart has introduced a youth-preserving cosmetics line called “geoGirl” aimed at kids ages 8 to 12 — a demographic with an estimated $2 billion in buying power. Some commentators are in an uproar over the entry-level makeup products, some of which are touted to have anti-aging ingredients. Here, a brief instant guide:
  • Human Rights Watch confirmed several cases of undercover police loyal to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s regime committing acts of violence and looting in an attempt to stoke fear of instability as demonstrations grew stronger Tuesday against the autocratic leader.
  • Finally, if it’s comic relief you’re after, turn to Page 105 for an interview with Angelo R. Mozilo, former chief executive of Countrywide Financial, a lender that profited by roping unsuspecting borrowers into poisonous loans.

    Mr. Mozilo, the commission said, described his company as having “prevented social unrest” by providing loans to 25 million borrowers, many of them members of minority groups. Never mind that throngs of these loans have resulted in foreclosures and evictions. “Countrywide was one of the greatest companies in the history of this country,” Mr. Mozilo maintained, “and probably made more difference to society, to the integrity of our society, than any company in the history of America.”

    You cannot make this stuff up.

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