Where Eagles Dare | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Where Eagles Dare

  • The extremely rare encounter happened in a flash, said Craig Koppie, an eagle coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. An adult eagle was enjoying a breakfast of fresh deer carcass that lay across the tracks near Aberdeen, Md., along the heavily used Northeast rail corridor.

    As the Northeast Regional 111 train chugged south about 8:30 a.m., an engineer spotted the majestic bird and blasted his horn. At first, the eagle didn’t budge, Koppie said. Then it slowly took off – too late. The train arrived at Washington Union Station two hours later with the bird stuck to the locomotive like an emblem.

  • One of the more bizarre aspects of officials sanctioning raves at the publicly owned L.A. Coliseum and Sports Arena is that Los Angeles County health authorities have actually embarked on a campaign to teach young people how to take ecstasy safely.

    Under the strategy of “harm reduction” — if you’re going to get wasted, mind as well help you do so without killing yourself — the county this year will distribute fliers at raves that give tips that essentially amount to advice on how not to O.D. on this illicit, schedule 1 drug.

  • A student in Connecticut stunned police dispatchers when he dialled 911 to ask how much trouble he could get in by growing marijuana.

    When told he could get arrested he said ‘thank you’ and hung up, only for police to trace the call and arrest him when they found drug growing equipment and pot at the house.

  • The Project Space Planes team – fronted by Joel Veitch, a British web animator – is attempting to snatch the world record for the longest flight by a paper plane.

    It launched a weather balloon carrying 200 of the planes on Tuesday from a site near Wolfsburg, Germany.

    The planes were released once the balloon reached an altitude of about 36,500m and a video camera captured the projectiles gliding toward the Earth’s cloud cover below. The balloon then burst at about 37,339m and arrived back on the ground within 40 minutes, over 300km from the launch site.

  • The drug called “Spice” has been banned in the Navy. However, 150 sailors have been discharged within the past 4 months, all because of the substance, including 16 from the Norfolk-based USS Bataan yesterday.

    Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens says, “It’s not acceptable the number of sailors that are using it.”

    Stevens says the spice problem is widespread. Spice is a synthetic drug, nicknamed “Legal Weed,” and can be purchased over-the-counter in most states. A ban is being considered in both Virginia and North Carolina, but while it’s legal for civilians, using it in the Navy will get you discharged.

  • Mark Zuckerberg announced that Facebook will be shut down in March. Managing the site has become too stressful.

    “Facebook has gotten out of control,” said Zuckerberg in a press conference outside his Palo Alto office, “and the stress of managing this company has ruined my life. I need to put an end to all the madness.”

    Zuckerberg went on to explain that starting March 15th, users will no longer be able to access their Facebook accounts.

    “After March 15th the whole website shuts down,” said Avrat Humarthi, Vice President of Technical Affairs at Facebook. “So if you ever want to see your pictures again, I recommend you take them off the internet. You won’t be able to get them back after Facebook goes out of business.”

  • ata encryption and storage has always been an important branch of research in computer engineering. In our project, we explored the possibility of harnessing a biological system as an alternative solution for data en/decryption and storage. Using bacteria as the information storage device is not new. However the practicability of previous research is being doubt due to the limited size of information available to be inserted into the bacteria.

    We recognized the current barricades in developing a truly useful system and we forecasted the indispensable modules that one would be anticipating when putting fantasy into reality. This year, we have proposed a model that is a true, massively parallel bacterial data storage system.

  • Legendary stripper and burlesque dancer “Blaze Starr” was born Fannie Belle Fleming in 1932, in West Virginia. She ran-away when she was fifteen yrs old, and ended up in Washington, D.C., where she was discovered working as a hat-check girl by her first manager Red Snyder– who convinced her to strip. It was Snyder who gave her the stagename “Blaze Starr.” Their time together would be short lived after he tried to rape her. With her fiery red hair, and voluptuous 38D-24-37 figure, and sultry, energetic and captivating stage presence (her stage routines included a comedic exploding coach gag and having a large trained black panther untie a ribbon on her costume which made it fall to the floor), Blaze became a major headliner at the “Two O`Clock Club” in Baltimore, Maryland and earned the nicknames “Miss Spontaneous Combustion” and “The Hottest Blaze in Burlesque.”

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