In War, Truth Is The First Casualty | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

In War, Truth Is The First Casualty

  • Nah, there’s no joke here. Just shitty human beings. Human beings that beat their spouses with increased frequency in relation to NFL outcomes. That’s right, a new study published in The Quarterly Journal of Economics reports that men are more likely to beat their wives in the event of an NFL upset. Their team loses and that’s how they react.
  • Friday in Geneva, the U.N. Human Rights Council, comprised of 47 nations, adopted a long list of over 200 recommendations of policy changes needed to bring the U.S. into compliance with its human rights obligations. The council’s recommendations came out of the first-ever comprehensive review of the United States’ human rights record, called the Universal Periodic Review (UPR). The recommendations covered a broad range of issue areas, including calling for the U.S. to impose a moratorium on the death penalty, to close Guantánamo, to reduce prison overcrowding, and to take steps to prevent racial profiling.
  • Women’s Wear Daily reports that the actor has hired retail executive Michael Henry to help him launch a lifestyle line, titled Stallone, that reflects the styles of his two best-known characters, Rocky and Rambo.
  • The Federal Bureau of Investigations announced recently that it is dedicating up to $1 billion for a Lockheed Martin-developed system that will enable on-the-fly analysis of detailed identification information that can be instantaneously shared with law enforcement all around the world.

    It’s called the “Next Generation Identification System” (NGIS), and if you’re a fan of television dramas like the CBS crime drama NCIS, it may sound pretty familiar.

    The FBI says their forthcoming system is an “incremental” upgrade to their currently-existing “Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System” (IAFIS), but it’s more than just an upgrade: it’s a revolution in law enforcement technology that’s bound to draw comparisons to the “Total Information Awareness” (TIA) project Congress ostensibly shut down in 2004.

    The TIA project, however, was broader in scope, targeting private individuals all over the world instead of just suspected criminals or terrorists.

  • According to the Times-Picayune’s David Hammer, Anglo-Suisse has filed three incident reports with the Coast Guard since last Friday. In those documents, Hammer reports, the company explained that as it used a remotely operated submarine to plug the well, some oil had been discharged into the Gulf.

    However, the company claimed in those reports that it had spilled less than five gallons of crude — an amount far too small to account for the scope of the spill shown in aerial photographs. Nor would five gallons of crude square with reports of oil washing up over a 30 mile stretch of Louisiana’s shoreline.

  • In the last few days, Obama administration officials have frequently faced the question: Is the fighting in Libya a war? From military officers to White House spokesmen up to the president himself, the answer is no. But that leaves the question: What is it?

    In a briefing on board Air Force One Wednesday, deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes took a crack at an answer. “I think what we are doing is enforcing a resolution that has a very clear set of goals, which is protecting the Libyan people, averting a humanitarian crisis, and setting up a no-fly zone,” Rhodes said. “Obviously that involves kinetic military action, particularly on the front end.”

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