War Is Hell | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

War Is Hell

  • Further proof that the recording industry’s oft-repeated claims of the downfall of the entire music industry hold no water: a new report finding that filesharing has led directly to “reduced costs of bringing works to market and a growing role of independent labels.” In other words, in the past decade, we have seen more music from independent outlets and at lower prices – something that consumers and music fans should all be happy about.
  • Ex-cons like Vinny Colangelo are barred from certain business pursuits.

    Felons can’t get a license in Florida as a pest-control operator. Colangelo can’t be a private detective or paramedic or title insurance agent or bail bondsman or labor union business agent. He can forget about employment with the Florida Lottery. Or qualifying as a notary.

    “In Florida, this guy couldn’t own a liquor store,” said Broward Sheriff Al Lamberti.

    Yet according to the DEA, Vincent Colangelo, who couldn’t kill bugs, serve cocktails or tail a cheating husband, could operate seven pain clinics and a pharmacy in Broward and Miami-Dade counties. His pill mills peddled more than 660,000 doses of oxycodone in just two years. The feds calculated Vinny’s proceeds at $22,392,391.

  • People in Seattle who would never touch heroin are trying fentanyl. What they don’t know is that it’s basically the same thing, only stronger.
  • The long-term use of ketamine does not only affect users’ minds. Studies show it destroys their bladders too.
  • These images present an excellent invitation to understanding the size and scope of one section of the opium industry in India. I found these pictures in the 29 July 1882 issue of the Scientific American, which in turn had reproduced them from the Bengal Commissioner Lt. Col. Walter S. Sherwill, who published them as color lithographs in 1850 and which (again) found their way into print in The Truth about Opium Smoking by Benjamin Broomhill1(1882). They are iconic images of a devastating trade and were frequently reproduced over many decades–mostly not for the “devastating” part of what I just wrote, but more for the industrial/business appreciation end, as was the case with this article in SciAmerican. The British interest in the trade stretched back two cneturies earlier, and of course the use of opium bends far back into Neolithic times.
  • In the summer of 1951 New York City was a marijuana jungle. From underpasses in the Bronx to empty lots on Avenue X, the razor-toothed fronds of 10 foot tall Cannabis sativa plants could be seen all around the city happily waving in the wind like any other innocuous and legal weed. But for all their persistence in invading the city’s forgotten horticultural corners, these plants were likely waving farewell: New York was no friend to pot.
  • This post will describe how to construct a pair of goggles which can be used to induce geometric visual hallucinations (1 2 3) via strobe light patterns. This tutorial should be accessible to anyone familiar with Arduino hacking, and I do not go into details of the electronics design. The effects are quite remarkable. These goggles can be constructed for 25 to 50 dollars, depending on how good you are at scavenging parts. I believe this design to be superior to some similar designs seen on the internet, and very much cheaper than this commercial equivalent ($649).
  • The deputy D.A. who prosecuted Paris Hilton and Bruno Mars scored coke 3 to 4 times a week in the crack den of Las Vegas … this according to the police report obtained by TMZ, and we’ve learned he’s been locked out of his office and is about to get fired.
  • While the U.S. State Department spends millions of dollars helping people in the Middle East circumvent Web censorship, a handful of California companies are providing autocratic Middle East regimes with the technology to censor the Web, reports The Wall Street Journal. The global Web-security market is a hot industry (valued at $1.8 billion in 2010) and U.S. companies are competing abroad to deliver web-blocking technologies to, in some cases, stridently repressive regimes. Here’s a look at what U.S. companies are up to in the region
  • Circa 1979. Remember, in Colombia they call it “bah-say”. Here we say, “ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US.”
  • The TargetMap website has released a penis average length world map, using colors to indicate the lengths of the men in the 115 countries of the world. Amongst them, Africa and Central and Southern America’s “performance” were the best. The average length in Congo was 17.93 centimeters, making it the world champion, while all Asian countries were all less than 11 centimeters, with South Korea in last place at 9.66 centimeters

    As it is understood, this map was created by netizens, with sources indicated with some of the data. Amongst the 115 countries shown on the map, the top three countries are Congo, Ecuador, and Ghana; while the length of Asian males on average are shorter than other countries, with Hong Kong placing 105th at 11.19 centimeters, Japan and mainland China at 10.78 centimeters occupying 110th place in hot pursuit.

  • A mere 20,000 Twitter users steal almost half of the spotlight on Twitter, which now ropes in a billion tweets every week.

    That means only 0.05% of the social network’s user base attracts attention, according to a new Yahoo Research study titled, “Who Says What to Whom on Twitter.”

    Of the 260 million tweets with URLs that the study’s authors analyzed, nearly 50% of the tweets consumed were created by what they called “elite” users who fall into four categories: media, celebrities, organizations and bloggers. “Ordinary” users encompass everyone else.

  • As a child in Uganda, John Bosco remembers hearing an old wives’ tale that if a man fell asleep in the sun and it crossed over him, he would wake up as a woman. “I used to try that as a kid,” says John now, some 30 years later. He sits at a table in a busy cafe across the road from the railway station in Southampton, his fingers playing with the handle of a glass of hot chocolate. “I’d spend all day lying under the sun. From childhood, I wanted to be a girl. I wanted dolls. At school, I played netball. I wanted to dress up like a girl … I rubbed herbs into my chest that were meant to make your breasts grow. I tried everything but it didn’t work.”
  • At a halal KFC in Sydney, Australia. A customer orders bacon and a muslim employee loses control.
  • The clip presented here is excerpted from ‘Motorcycle Kill,’ a video collected and shared by members of the “kill team” of U.S. soldiers who murdered civilians in Afghanistan and mutilated the corpses. The jumpy, 30-minute video – shot by soldiers believed to be with another battalion in the 5th Stryker Brigade – shows American troops gunning down two Afghans on a motorcycle who may have been armed. Even if the killings were part of a legitimate combat engagement, however, it is a clear violation of Army standards to share such footage. The video was taken on patrol with a helmet-mounted camera; at one point, the soldier shooting the images can be heard boasting, “I got it all on camera.”
  • Life can be lonely on the high seas and one pirate has decided enough is enough, it’s about time he got himself a wife.

    But the Somali pirate chief has taken a fancy to his 13-year-old Danish hostage – and he is so besotted with her he’s willing to let the rest of her family go free, and even forget the $5million dollar ransom his pirate colleagues demanded.

  • It was the biggest manhunt in FBI history. So it’s not surprising that investigators took all kinds of extraordinary measures to try to figure out who mailed the anthrax-filled letters that killed five people, scared the country half to death, and have jumped back into public consciousness, thanks to a series of independent reviews over the last six weeks.

    But even by the outsized standards of this anthrax case, one step stood out: an attempt to, in effect, reverse-engineer the mailings that carried the killer spores, based on microscopic differences between the blue eagles imprinted on the envelopes.

  • New evidence has emerged that the Iranian government sees the current unrest in the Middle East as a signal that the Mahdi–or Islamic messiah–is about to appear.

    CBN News has obtained a never-before-seen video produced by the Iranian regime that says all the signs are moving into place — and that Iran will soon help usher in the end times.

    While the revolutionary movements gripping the Middle East have created uncertainty throughout the region, the video shows that the Iranian regime believes the chaos is divine proof that their ultimate victory is at hand.

  • Scientists probing the deaths of baby dolphins in the area affected by last year’s BP oil spill have been ordered by the government not to speak about the project.

    Wildlife biologists who have been contracted by the National Marine Fisheries Service to investigate a huge rise in dolphin mortality this year must keep their findings confidential.

    The gagging order was imposed because the review of the deaths is part of the federal criminal investigation into last year’s BP disaster.

  • Met Commander Bob Broadhurst apologises to the Home Affairs Select Committee after misleading them over the presence of undercover officers at the G20 protests in 2009.

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