Whomp That Sucker | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Whomp That Sucker

  • Listen to an excerpt from “The Rise and Fall of Underground Comix in San Francisco and Beyond” read by author Jay Kinney
  • Yes, the event was “cool.” When was the last time you could tweet a president, with the (slim) potential for him to answer your questions?

    But there was a problem with the Twitter aspect of the town hall — it went in one direction, which goes against the point of Twitter. Not only did the President not type in his answers, they were much longer than the 140 characters Twitterers use to communicate.

  • Dr. Saper estimates that 15% to 20% of them are faking—or at least, aren’t as incapacitated as they say. Some are dependent on painkillers or seeking to resell them, he says. Some want a doctor to certify that they’ll never be able to work again and deserve disability payments. Some, he thinks, don’t really want to get well because they subconsciously find power in their pain.
  • Police noticed the man filming the shooting and an officer jumped into his truck, and put a pistol to his head, Benoit said. The video shows officers crowding around Herisse’s vehicle before opening fire, followed by indistinguishable yelling at onlookers, including Benoit, to stop filming.

    The cop yelled: “Wanna be a [expletive] paparazzi?” Benoit recounted in a TV interview.

    “My phone was smashed, he stepped on it, handcuffed me,” the 35-year-old car stereo technician told CNN.
    Despite his phone being destroyed, Benoit was able to save the footage by taking the memory card out of the device and putting it in his mouth before handing it over to police, he said, adding that officers smashed several other cameras in the chaos which followed the shooting.

  • The well-dressed man in dark glasses didn’t attract a second glance when he walked into a gallery near Union Square on Tuesday.

    And soon he was gone, after grabbing a drawing by Pablo Picasso that was being offered for more than $200,000, and vanishing in a waiting taxicab, San Francisco police said.

  • In this week’s crazy NYC subway video series, a woman, nude from the waist down, sets up a wash station on the blue bench of a subway car and proceeds to take a camping-style shower.

    With water and suds pooling on the subway car floor, the woman deliberately cleans herself in a 3-part YouTube video uploaded by a straphanger. It’s anyone’s guess what happens in the second and third videos, as they have been removed from YouTube for violating the policy on nudity or sexual content. See Video Below (Warning NSFW):

  • An Internet-based treasure hunt, known as geocaching, caused a bomb scare in West Yorkshire after a local cafe owner reported a suspicious package.

    The hidden box was blown up in a controlled explosion after being placed near the cafe, which was forced to be shut down for two hours.

    Geocaching participants use GPS and other mobile devices to hide and locate caches around the world. The caches typically contain a logbook to sign or small item to trade.

  • Alexander Shulgin is the world’s foremost “psychonaut.” The 82-year-old chemist has not only created more of the 300 known consciousness-altering (or psychoactive) compounds than anyone living or dead, he has, by his own account, sampled somewhere between 200 and 250 of them himself—most of them cooked up in the musty lab behind his home in the hills east of Berkeley, Calif., where he has shared many a chemical voyage with his wife of 26 years, Ann.

    “I take them myself because I am interested in their activity in the human mind. How would you test that in a rat or mouse?” says Shulgin, known to friends as Sasha.

    He has paid the price for his avocation. Some of his creations have induced uncontrollable vomiting, paralysis and the feeling that his bones were melting, among other terrors.

  • Story of a crazy show I was at that became a riot. Best show EVER!
  • COVENTRY woman Samantha Haworth is lucky to be alive after a gastric band made her stomach “explode”.

    Samantha had the band fitted when her weight soared to 28 stone, putting her health at risk.

    Two years later, an incredibly rare complication meant the band ‘slipped’ inside her, leaving the 25- year-old from Walsgrave in agony.

    But she mistook her deadly symptoms for heartburn.

    Without Samantha knowing, her gastric band had moved and turned septic. When her stomach could not cope any more it burst.

  • The recent class-action lawsuit brought against Taco Bell raised questions about the quality of food many Americans eat each day.

    Chief among those concerns is the use of cellulose (read: wood pulp), an extender whose use in a roster of food products, from crackers and ice creams to puddings and baked goods, is now being exposed. What you’re actually paying for — and consuming — may be surprising.

  • DHS is gearing up with just about every terror gadget and detection system possible to protect us from a pretty much nonexistent threat in the United States.

    Now they are testing roadside radiation trackers and sporting event radiation trackers in the next phase to screen the populace.

  • TeaMp0isoN claim to expose the personal details of Anonymous & Lulzsec via a tweet. They posted a pastie link which contains the details of various Lulzsec members and Anonymous.
  • Gilbert had high expectations of America’s youngsters, and with such he tried to help the future engineers, doctors and leaders by providing toys worthy of their imaginations. As the inventor of the Erector Set, and seeing its commercial appeal, the he and his company set a higher goal. They became the leading manufacturer of scientific toys (chemistry sets) and construction sets (Erector), all of which gained wide acclaim at the retail level. Interested in the joy of science more than remuneration, however, Gilbert created the Atomic Energy Lab U-238 – with the help of MIT’s able faculty. The toy was made to de-mystify the perils of nuclear energy and to encourage the understanding of chemistry, physics and nuclear science – ultimately helping kids (and adults) become more open to the possibilities these disciplines offer. This educational composite, which was marketed during 1950-51, sold for $49.50 – a very high price for a toy set, even by today’s standard.
  • The mysterious odor coming from Room 131 of the Lincoln Motel 6 last week turned out to be more than rotten food or a clogged toilet.

    The entire room was covered with feces, Lincoln Police Capt. David Beggs said.

    Police are looking for the person responsible for the vandalism, which caused about $3,500 damage to the hotel room. Employees reported the incident Saturday.

    After guests complained of an odor, employees discovered the room, including the curtains, table and counter, was covered with feces. Surrounding rooms had to be vacated, Beggs said.

    The last occupant, who stayed in the room June 22-29, checked in with three cats. But those who saw the room said some of the feces appeared to be too big to be from a cat, Beggs said.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

Posted under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 7, 2011

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

More BLArRrG! Posts