Goin’ Hog Wild | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Goin’ Hog Wild

  • Nick said: “We were stunned.

    “I thought, ‘My God what is it?’ It’s like nothing we have ever seen – it almost looks prehistoric.”

    The couple, who were walking their dogs at Bridge of Don, Aberdeen, called coastguards to investigate.

  • BHOPAL: This real life incident has the making of a scene from some vampire movie. A 22-year-old woman in Damoh district of Madhya Pradesh has told the police that her husband drank her blood for the past three years. “He used to take a syringe and draw blood from my arms,” Deepa Ahirwar said. “He would then empty it in a glass and drink it. For three years he did this on a regular basis, threatening me of dire consequences if I revealed this to anyone.”
  • According to the lawsuit, Dr. Anthony Pickett performed the circumcision on the boy, now 8, at the Maternity Center of Vermont on Jan. 3, 2003. Pickett used a Miltex Mogen clamp that removed 85 percent of the top of the boy’s penis, according to the suit.

    “Because of the defective design of the circumcision clamp, there was no protection for the head of the penis and Dr. Pickett was unable to visualize the (head) when excising the foreskin,” according to the plaintiffs’ court papers filed regarding the settlement. “For this reason, an amputation to the (head) of plaintiff’s penis occurred.”

  • Owning yeast and sugar isn’t enough to get you arrested in most places. But in some communities of rural Alaska, the high rate of alcohol abuse has caused voters to ban booze along with possession of the supplies to make it at home.

    A recent case highlights a 2007 state law that makes it illegal for a person to possess yeast and sugar in a local option community if they intend to use the ingredients to make home-brew, a cloudy, intoxicating liquid often mixed with fruit juice. Villages have the option to ban booze as one way to combat to a longstanding epidemic of alcohol-related injuries and deaths in rural Alaska.

  • A Japanese rock musician who tried to hang himself after being arrested for unruly behaviour on a flight to the Mariana Islands has died in hospital, reports say.

    Rocker Taiji Sawada, who was best known as the former bass player with heavy metal group “X”, died yesterday when medics at Saipan’s Commonwealth Health Centre turned off his life support, the Saipan Tribune reported.

    The Marianas Variety newspaper reported that Sawada, 45, had been in intensive care since July 14 after he tried to hang himself with a bedsheet in a jail in the US-administered Pacific territory.

    He had been arrested three days before for allegedly assaulting a female cabin crew attendant during a Delta Airlines flight from Tokyo to Saipan, court documents showed.

  • After 15 years of market growth…[dealers] were finding it harder to sell drugs, as pay cuts, tax rises and job losses left recreational users with less money. The Irish gangs were unable to shift larger hauls and, in any case, lacked the resources to buy in bulk, so they were ordering smaller quantities. This liquidity crisis was an unfamiliar problem for criminals used to having a river of money at their disposal.

    User arrests are down by 20% in recent years and the value of drugs seized—used as a proxy for market size—has hit 15-year lows. This demand elasticity is evident in both hard and soft drug markets: the value of cocaine seized last year is less than half that of previous years, marijuana’s a tenth of its 2006 peak. Even heroin junkies have economised; the value of seized heroin has fallen more than 85% since 2008.

  • Eight illegal immigrants from Mexico were arrested on drug trafficking charges after federal and Las Vegas law enforcement officials seized 212 pounds of drugs worth an estimated street value of $5.7 million in the largest methamphetamine bust in Nevada history, authorities announced Thursday.

    Police also seized $280,000 in cash, six guns and nine vehicles used for drug trafficking after searching nine residential properties in Las Vegas and Henderson on Tuesday.

    Law enforcement officials heralded the record bust as a significant blow to Las Vegas’ illegal underground that would be felt by every player, including drug bosses, small-time dealers and users hoping to score on the street. The raid yielded four pounds of heroin and 208 pounds of methamphetamine in varying stages of processing, from its liquid form to the crystal-like pieces sold on the street in small quantities for consumption.

  • There was a time when a mushroom cloud billowing over the Nevada desert was celebrated as a symbol of American strength — and, about 75 miles southeast in Las Vegas, as a terrific tourist draw.

    In the 1950s, casinos threw “dawn parties,” where gamblers caroused until a flash signaled the explosion of an atomic bomb at the Nevada Test Site. Tourism boosters promoted the Atomic Cocktail (vodka, brandy, champagne and a dash of sherry) and pinups such as Miss Atomic Blast, who was said to radiate “loveliness instead of deadly atomic particles.”

    Sixty years after the first atmospheric tests here, the 1,375-square-mile site continues to be a tourist magnet, though of a far different nature. Thousands of people each year sign up months in advance to see what is essentially a radioactive ghost town.

  • If your heritage is non-African, you are part Neanderthal, according to a new study in the July issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution. Discovery News has been reporting on human/Neanderthal interbreeding for some time now, so this latest research confirms earlier findings.

    Damian Labuda of the University of Montreal’s Department of Pediatrics and the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center conducted the study with his colleagues. They determined some of the human X chromosome originates from Neanderthals, but only in people of non-African heritage.

    “This confirms recent findings suggesting that the two populations interbred,” Labuda was quoted as saying in a press release. His team believes most, if not all, of the interbreeding took place in the Middle East, while modern humans were migrating out of Africa and spreading to other regions.

  • Some close to Bachmann fear she won’t be equal to the stress of the campaign, much less the presidency itself.

    “When she gets ‘em, frankly, she can’t function at all. It’s not like a little thing with a couple Advils. It’s bad,” the adviser says. “The migraines are so bad and so intense, she carries and takes all sorts of pills. Prevention pills. Pills during the migraine. Pills after the migraine, to keep them under control. She has to take these pills wherever she goes.”

    To staff, Bachmann has implausibly blamed the headaches on uncomfortable high-heel shoes, but those who have worked closely with her cite stress, a busy schedule and anything going badly for Bachmann as causes.

  • “I have to say, marijuana saved my life,” Lynx told me. “I would probably be dead if I didn’t have it.” She discovered pot while recovering from her cancer treatments. She’d been prescribed morphine and OxyContin, which she quit cold turkey. One day when she was having a bout of nausea, a friend offered her a toke. She was reluctant at first. The girls’ biological father had been “a druggie” when they were young, Lynx said.

    But the drug worked wonders, and soon Lynx became one of the first five minors to get a medical marijuana card in Montana. Now Lamb has one, too.

    Pot has also helped the twins rekindle the creative impulses they once channeled into their music. They’ve both taken up painting — astrological themes, mostly — and Lynx restores furniture. They hope to enroll in college, and intend to dedicate themselves to making medical marijuana legal in all 50 states.

  • Within 20 minutes of arriving through his front door she had flagged down a car and caught a train. He found out she had also run up a £500 bill on his mobile phone.

    Heartbroken Mr Gannon, who married Patrice in Jamaica early this year, believes his new wife fled to Bristol to meet a Jamaican boyfriend with whom she had organised the scheme.

  • Yesterday, historian and author Barry H. Landau was arrested on charges of stealing historical documents, including ones signed by Abraham Lincoln, from the Maryland Historical Society. The arrest eventually led to Landau’s locker, where police found upwards of 60 documents worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    Laudau’s heist and the tremendous value of the stolen documents got us thinking about the other end of the literature theft spectrum: what are the most frequently stolen books from bookstores?

    The results are surprisingly consistent–the same books and authors keep getting stolen across the country, so much so that many of them are frequently shelved behind the counter. Here are 5 of the most frequently stolen books, with sources listed below.

  • The main ingredients are melatonin, a hormone that is intended to induce drowsiness; L-theanine, an amino acid primarily found in green tea; GABA, a chemical that calms the mind; B vitamins, and chamomile — a plant that often winds up as tea that people drink to help them unwind.
  • Rupert Murdoch, the Chairman and CEO of News Corporation, was the target of “a white foam pie” attack on Tuesday as he was testifying before a British Parliament committee about the News of the World phone hacking scandal.
  • Apparently, the white boy was in the wrong country.
    Treat the non-whites in white countries like kings and queens but don’t receive the same treatment in their country, a bit funny, isn’t it?
    The poor little kid… If I knew who he was, I would raise him, I’m still not sure if he’s dead or alive, such a poor kid… another kid bites the dust from non-whites action as always.
    He is white, why does people get upset when I mention the word WHITE?
    This is life, accept it.
    The Chinese people are saying “white boy, go home, go away”.
  • An electronic DOT road sign was apparently hacked when a displayed message read “Impeach Obama.”
  • After inhaling a mall-bought batch of “Iaroma”—a synthetic pot substitute sold as ‘incense’—a 19-year-old Chicago boy dies after taking a 100 mph joyride into a neighbor’s house.
  • Baphomet is an enigmatic, goat-headed figure found in several instance in the history of occultism. From the Knights Templar of the Middle-Ages and the Freemasons of the 19th century to modern currents of occultism, Baphomet never fails to create controversy. But where does Baphomet originate from and, most importantly, what is the true meaning of this symbolic figure? This article looks at the origins of Baphomet, the esoteric meaning of Baphomet and its occurrence in popular culture.
  • The man, John Blanchard, was allegedly smoking crystal meth at the storage yard near his camper when he left a propane torch ignited on the ground, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

    The torch flame lit a container of gunpowder Blanchard was apparently stockpiling, causing an explosion.

    A loaded rifle was recovered from the scene as was more gunpowder and 300 feet of detonation cord found in an open safe, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

  • Amid news that troubled rap veteran Earl “DMX” Simmons had allegedly been caught smuggling contraband into prison thus extending his sentence, a spokesperson from the Arizona Department of Corrections has decried the erroneous reports that the rapper committed the said offense.

    Barrett Marson, the media contact that dismissed the reports, gave a quote to website Rumorfix stating, “He did not smuggle drugs into prison. He failed a drug test, I don’t know what drugs he took, but that’s it. He was due to be released today but will now be released on July 19th.” Prison records show that DMX was not exactly a model prisoner with several disciplinary write-ups including drug test failure, disorderly conduct and possession of drugs.

  • Mota went to speak with the driver, who said he was there to deal with the lack of a license plate. Mota smelled marijuana inside the vehicle, he said.

    Officers found the 17 pounds in large plastic containers and called county narcotics officers to investigate.

    The driver indicated he had paperwork for possessing medical marijuana but 17 pounds is well over allowable limits, Mota said.

  • Mortgage industry employees are still signing documents they haven’t read and using fake signatures more than eight months after big banks and mortgage companies promised to stop the illegal practices that led to a nationwide halt of home foreclosures.

    County officials in at least three states say they have received thousands of mortgage documents with questionable signatures since last fall, suggesting that the practices, known collectively as “robo-signing,” remain widespread in the industry.

  • The Army refuses to release information on its investigation into whether a three-star general conducted psychological operations on members of Congress during their visits to Afghanistan, according to the two Army information operations officers at the center of the controversy.
    Michael Holmes, the officer who says he refused orders to conduct Psy-Ops on American officials, and Laurel Levine filed a federal FOIA complaint, saying the Army and the U.S. Army Central Command refused to release the records.
    Holmes and Levine says the Army investigation “also covered allegations of whistleblower retaliation conducted against the plaintiffs for challenging unlawful orders.”
  • Bad hoodoo from the Jessamine County Fair. Dark times. A champion laid low. On Wednesday, David L. Warner Jr., of Nicholasville, Ky., drove a beaut of a derby in the ultra-competitive small car class. Warner demolished many things on his way to the title. But instead of getting to enjoy his victory, Warner got busted for DUI. The champion had allegedly been pounding Bud Lights before the derby, according to a whole bunch of dirty snitches who ratted him out to the cops.
  • Human rights lawyers are seeking an arrest warrant against a former CIA legal director who allegedly approved drone attacks in Pakistan that killed hundreds.
    It’s claimed John Rizzo agreed on a list of people to be targeted by drone strikes – a practice which started in 2004 under the Bush administration. For more on this RT joined by Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer.
  • Julia Sullivan wants to be a cheerleader.

    She likes to dance. She wants to get people excited for games. She has friends on the cheerleading squad.

    “I just think it would be fun,” the 16-year-old said.

    So she’s practiced. Her older sister, a former cheerleader, helped her figure out ways she could cheer from her wheelchair. Julia, who’ll be a junior at Aurora High School this fall, was born without legs and with arms that stop short of her elbows.

    This spring, for the third time, she tried out to be a cheerleader. For the third time, she didn’t made the squad.

    Last month, she and her parents, Mike and Carolyn Sullivan, asked the Aurora school board to correct what they see as “scoring errors” in her tryout evaluations this spring, saying she was given no accommodation for her disability.

    Their attorney cited the Americans With Disabilities Act and other federal laws that prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities.

  • On June 1, the Taliban raided the Taliban crossed the border from Afghanistan and raided the Shaltalu area of the district of Dir in northwestern Pakistan. This video shows the execution of more than a dozen Pakistani policemen who were captured during the fighting. The Taliban leader gives a speech prior to executing the Pakistani men:

    “These are the enemies of Islam who originated from Pakistan. They are the Pakistani police, soldiers and their supporters who recently lined up six kids in Swat and shot them execution style. These Pakistanis are now our captive and we will avenge the death of the children by doing the same to them.”

  • There has been speculation for months now that the House Republicans’ transportation bill proposal would be terrible for transit, biking, and walking. And sure enough, John Mica didn’t disappoint.

    The chair of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee yesterday released a six-year reauthorization proposal that would slash overall transportation funding 33 percent and eliminate dedicated funds for biking and walking.

  • That then gave them access across large parts of the News International network, possibly including the archived emails, and to the Sun’s “content management system” (CMS) – which formats news onto pages. That will have included the code for the “breaking news” element of the Sun’s main webpage; changing the entire content on the page would be too obvious.

    By including a line of Javascript in the “breaking news” element, the hackers were able to ensure that anyone visiting the Sun’s home page would, as the ticker was automatically refreshed, they would be redirected to anywhere that the hackers chose.

    Initially they made it redirect to a fake page they had created at new-times.co.uk/sun which attempted to look and read like a Sun story claiming that Rupert Murdoch had been found dead. That page used a template of another story that first appeared on 14 July, suggesting that the hackers either grabbed an archived story or have had access since then.

  • Video – Rep. Jan Schakowsky On WLS Chicago – July 13, 2011The proof comes at the 3:20 mark, but the entire clip is worth seeing.

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Posted under Culture, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 20, 2011

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