His First Million Women | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

His First Million Women

  • When Eddie opened his box to look for the regulation toy included in the meal he was happy to discover a sheet of temporary tattoos. It was when looking through these his parents were shocked to find a swastika among the tattoos.“Eddie is a huge fan of tattoos, but we thought this was a very strange tattoo for a child and that it was wrong of the shop to buy in this product,” said Malin Hägglund to the paper.

    According to news agency TT, the owners of Frasses have expressed regret over the incident and say that they believed the product had been imported from China and that the swastika had thus been included by mistake.

    The swastika, an equilateral cross with its arms bent at right angles, is most commonly associated as a symbol of the Nazi party in Germany and was adopted as the state flag of Germany in the 1930s. It is now outlawed in the country if used as a symbol for neo-Nazism.

  • In a move that calls to mind the start of the most serious unrest in nations across the Middle East over the last year, David Cameron, Britain’s prime minister, told Parliament Thursday that authorities may shut down social media websites like Facebook and Twitter, in hopes that it would return calm to their streets.The remarks came one day after British authorities discussed turning off the messaging function on BlackBerry phones, which they suggested may remove a tool protesters and rioters were using.

    “Everyone watching these horrific actions will be struck by how they were organized via social media,” Cameron told Parliament. “Free flow of information can be used for good. But it can also be used for ill.

    “So we are working with the Police, the intelligence services and industry to look at whether it would be right to stop people communicating via these websites and services when we know they are plotting violence, disorder and criminality.”

  • A radical group that opposes nanotechnology has has claimed responsibility for at least two bombing attacks on researchers in Mexico and it praises the “Unabomber,” whose mail-bombs killed three people and injured 23 in the United States.A manifesto posted Tuesday on a radical website mentions at least five other Mexican researchers whose work it opposes, and lauded Theodore Kaczynski, who is serving a life sentence for bombs that targeted university professors and airline executives.

    It was issued in the name of a group whose title could be translated as “Individuals Tending Toward the Savage.”

  • David Byrne, Lead Singer, Talking HeadsI don’t think computers will have any important effect on the arts in 2007. When it comes to the arts they’re just big or small adding machines. And if they can’t “think,” that’s all they’ll ever be. They may help creative people with their bookkeeping, but they won’t help in the creative process.

  • The South Korea government will push ahead with plans to scrap the current real-name system for Internet users in the wake of the country’s worst online security breach, local media reported Thursday.The Ministry of Public Administration and Security is set to report to ruling party lawmakers about comprehensive measures to protect personal information online, including abolishing the real-name registration system, Yonhap news agency said.

    The real-name system, introduced in 2007, requires people to use their real names and resident registration numbers when making online postings on websites with more than 100,000 visitors per day.

    The move comes after the personal information of about 35 million users of the country’s popular Internet and social media sites Nate and Cyworld was stolen in a hacking attack last month.

    The stolen data included user IDs, passwords, resident registration numbers, names, mobile phone numbers and email addresses.

  • MySpace’s usual homepage was replaced this evening with a puzzling message, leading many (including this reporter) to initially believe the site may have been hacked. That apparently was not the case.Visitors to the social network were greeted by a largely blank page topped with the browser title bar that read “All is wrong :(” where the MySpace name would normally appear. In the upper left of the normally vibrant page was the message: “We messed up our code so bad that even puppies and kittens may be in danger. Please turn back …now.” It was followed up with the message, “* Have your pet spayed or neutered” in the lower right.

    A few minutes after being accessed by CNET and contacted for comment, MySpace’s page was replaced with the message, “The service is unavailable,” only to be replaced again with the original message.

    MySpace representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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