Do Unto Others…Then Split

Do Unto Others…Then Split

Do Unto Others Then Split
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Babysitter Accused of Child Abuse

Tawny Hickman, 18-year-old babysitter from Fort Pierce, Florida, has been arrested and faces charges of child abuse and battery of a 9-year-old boy. According to a report from the St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office, the mother of the alleged victim had heard rumors around the neighborhood that “stuff was going on” and contacted local police after she found with hickeys her son’s neck. She said she didn’t want to believe the rumors but had to call 911 once she saw her son’s neck Sunday morning. The young boy told that he awoke in the middle of the night and went in to Hickman’s room “and laid with her.” According to reports Tawny Hickman claimed that she had took someone else’s prescription medication. Once in bed with her, he told police she bit his neck twice. The babysitter had what appeared to be hickeys on her lower stomach are that she says were made by the 9-year-old boy.
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Why We Took Cocaine Out of Soda
Hale’s account of the role of racism and social injustice in Coca-Cola’s removal of coca is corroborated by the attitudes that the shaped subsequent U.S. cocaine regulation movement. Cocaine wasn’t even illegal until 1914 — 11 years after Coca-Cola’s change — but a massive surge in cocaine use was at its peak at the turn of the century. Recreational use increased five-fold in a period of less than two decades. During that time, racially oriented arguments about rape and other violence, and social effects more so than physical health concerns, came to shape the discussion. The same hypersexuality that was touted as a selling point during the short-lived glory days of Vin Mariani was now a crux of cocaine’s bigoted indictment. U.S. State Department official Dr. Hamilton Wright said in 1910, “The use of cocaine by the negroes of the South is one of the most elusive and troublesome questions which confront the enforcement of the law … often the direct incentive to the crime of rape …
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Controversies – Private Database of One-Third of U.S. Adults Sold to Debt Collectors and Banks

Equifax, one of the nation’s largest credit reporting agencies, has been selling the personal information of Americans to debt collectors and other businesses, according to an NBC News investigation. The Work Number, a company owned by Equifax, maintains “what may be the most powerful and thorough private database of Americans’ personal information ever created,” Bob Sullivan of NBC News reported. The database contains 190 million employment records, salary records and health insurance details involving more than 30% of all U.S. adults. And much of this data, including how much people have been paid, is sold to third parties, including bill collectors and banks. “It’s the biggest privacy breach in our time, and it’s legal and no one knows it’s going on,” Robert Mather, who runs a small employment background company named Pre-Employ.com, told the network news web site. “It’s like a secret CIA.”
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Whale Vomit Worth £100,000 Found on Dog Walk

Whale vomit is also known as ambergris and is used to make perfume. It is formed in the digestive system of sperm whales and has a very strong and unpleasant aroma. Whales excrete it through the mouth when it is too large to pass through the digestive system. Perfume makers use it as it has a smell similar to musk.
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New malware accuses victims of viewing child porn and shows them proof

A particularly nasty new bit of drive-by malware has been discovered trying to extort money from users in Germany by accusing them of viewing child pornography. It’s a horrendous scare tactic to employ, but it’s also one that seems like it could be incredibly effective in deceiving innocent surfers. When confronted with such a horrific accusation, there’s no doubt that some would move quickly to comply in whatever way they were told was necessary.
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Revenge-porn website victims launch action against Texxxan and GoDaddy

Such sites, going back to the infamous IsAnyoneUp revenge site run by Hunter Moore (aka The Most Hated Man on the Internet), are now protected by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which states that websites aren’t liable for user-submitted content. Or as Mr. Moore interpreted his legal defense in an interview with BetaBeat’s Jessica Roy: “No one can do sh*t and I don’t give a f*ck.”
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How To Make Fake Gold

To create a top-of-the-line fake gold bar, one that’s capable of being passed off as a real gold bar (the only kind we think worth making), you need to match the color, surface hardness, density, chemical, and nuclear properties of gold perfectly. To do this, you could start off with a tungsten slug about 3 mm smaller in each dimension than the finished gold bar, and then cast a 1.5 mm layer of pure gold all around it. This bar would feel right, it would have a dead ring when knocked (as gold does), it would test right chemically, it would weigh correctly, and it would also pass an x-ray fluorescence scan, the 1.5 mm layer of pure gold being more than enough to stop the x-rays from reaching any tungsten. You’d pretty much have to drill it to find out that it’s fake.
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A short history of hacking attacks against the media

The revelation of the Chinese hacking campaign against reporters working for the New York Times has raised awareness of targeted malware attacks, but what does the history of cyberattacks against media agencies look like? Here’s a short (and definitely incomplete) list of some of the stories we have seen over the years, where news agencies have fallen foul of hackers and cybercriminals
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Former Middle School Teacher Sentenced To 10 Years In Child Porn Case

“While many of the pictures were related to the defendant’s duties as yearbook advisor, investigators discovered that he secretly photographed his middle school female students by placing a camera under a table that would record images up the skirts of the female students while they sat in his classroom,” the documents said. The forensic analysis also showed that Hendricks magnified the pictures of students in an effort to enhance the images. Other images show that he took additional photographs and video recordings that attempted “to look down the shirts of female students in his classroom,” the documents said. The forensic examination also turned up evidence that Hendricks had attempted to use a computer technique called “flesh meshing” in an effort to manipulate images of clothed female students in a way that made them appear undressed. The investigators found a document on the computer entitled “How to Use Flesh-mesh X-ray in Photoshop.”
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What to do with $175,000 in weed found in your back yard

I am standing chest-deep in a dank, muddy concrete-lined hole in Silver Lake, staring eye-level into a duffel bag full of high-grade drugs. It smells strongly of marijuana – despite the fact that someone sealed it tightly into jars, Ziplocs and professionally vacuum-sealed pouches before THEY HID IT IN MY BACK YARD. I am starting to panic. I already did the full Tex-Avery-wolf AOOOOGAH! upon discovering the mammoth sackful of dope – estimated to be worth somewhere north of $175,000. My jaw already dropped. My eyes already bugged out. Now my heart is thumping my gullet. Breathing is getting iffy. I try to speak. I think my exact words to the solar-panel technician standing equally open-mouthed next to me are something to the effect of “Holy. Fucking. SHIT!”
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Japan’s Philanderers Stay Faithful to Their ‘Infidelity Phones’

Fujitsu’s “privacy mode” is a layer of nearly invisible security that hides missed calls, emails and text messages from contacts designated as private. If one of those acquaintances gets in touch, the only signal of that communication is a subtle change in the color or shape of how the battery sign or antenna bars are displayed. If ignored, the call doesn’t appear in the phone log. The changes are so subtle that it would be impossible to spot for an untrained eye. When the privacy mode is turned off through a secret combination of keys, the concealed calls and messages appear, and voice mail becomes accessible.
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HIGH SCHOOL STREAKER GETS AWAY [Video]

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List of destroyed libraries

Libraries have been deliberately or accidentally destroyed or badly damaged. Sometimes a library is purposely destroyed as a form of cultural cleansing.[citation needed] There are examples of accidentally destroyed libraries by human actions. Other times they are damaged by natural disasters like earthquakes, floods or accidental fires. Library fires have happened sporadically through the centuries: notable examples are the destruction of the Library of Alexandria and the accidental burning of the Duchess Anna Amalia Library in Weimar. Causes vary from arson to the sun’s rays setting fire to leaflets through the action of a magnifying lens in a library in Northam, Devon.
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LeBron James Heroin Bag Art Showing Up In Philadelphia

An undercover cop made a sizable purchase of 140 bags of heroin last Thursday. Standard on the mean streets of Philly, but something was different about these baggies: they were labled “LeBron James“. Yep, The King himself is now officially an endorser of Philadelphia’s finest heroin!
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