16mm film | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Experimental Compound MER 17 and LSD-25: Psychosis

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virtue of his grade or position, to
knowledge or possession of classi-
fied matter or information
Although this film may have
been shown to the general public,
THE FACT THAT YOU HAVE
SEEN IT HERE IS SECRET,
AND MUST NOT BE DISCLOSED
to any persons other than those
whose officicial duties require such
knowledge or information and
who have been cleared for access
to SECRET information.

 

National Archives and Records Administration

Experimental Compound MER 17 and LSD-25: Psychosis

National Security Council. Central Intelligence Agency. (09/18/1947 – 12/04/1981)

Experimental Compound MER 17 (Frenquel) and LSD-25: Psychosis. ARC Identifier 1634172 / Local Identifier 263.1057. This film examines medical experiments to determine the efficacy of LSD-25 and MER 17 (Frenquel) on treating psychosis.

File under Blast From The Past, Conspiracy Theory, Drugsploitation, Massive Consumption of Drugs, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB

Suicide Squad

  • If organized religion is the opium of the masses, then disorganized religion is the marijuana of the lunatic fringe.
  • 1917 J. A. F. Fisher Let. 9 Sept. in Memories (1919) v. 78, I hear that a new order of Knighthood is on the tapis—O.M.G. (Oh! My God!)—Shower it on the Admiralty!
  • On February 5th, 2003, then-Secretary of State Colin Powell went to the United Nations, to make the case for war in Iraq. A central plank of his presentation: the anthrax attacks that killed five people and helped send the country into a panic in the days after 9/11.

    “Less than a teaspoon-full of dry anthrax in an envelope shut down the United States Senate in the fall of 2001. This forced several hundred people to undergo emergency medical treatment and killed two postal workers just from an amount just about this quantity that was inside of an envelope,” Powell said. “Saddam Hussein could have produced 25,000 liters. If concentrated into this dry form, this amount would be enough to fill tens upon tens upon tens of thousands of teaspoons..”

    By the end of the following month, the invasion of Iraq was underway.

  • Manslaughter and perjury are among possible charges that Justice Department investigators are exploring in the early stages of their probe into the Gulf oil spill, people familiar with the inquiry said Tuesday.
  • One week after an international military coalition intervened in Libya, the cost to U.S. taxpayers has reached at least $600 million, according figures provided by the Pentagon.

    U.S. ships and submarines in the Mediterranean have unleashed at least 191 Tomahawk cruise missiles from their arsenals to the tune of $268.8 million, the Pentagon said.

    U.S. warplanes have dropped 455 precision guided bombs, costing tens of thousands of dollars each.

    A downed Air Force F-15E fighter jet will cost more than $60 million to replace.

    And operation of the war craft, guzzling ever-expensive fuel to maintain their positions off the Libyan coast and in the skies above, could reach millions of dollars a week, experts say.

  • Our Milky Way galaxy may be home to at least two billion Earthlike planets, a new study says.

    But don’t start making colonization plans just yet: The number is actually far lower than many scientists were expecting, which could make it hard to find other “Earths” in our galaxy, the study authors say.

  • Reptiles speakin’ in tongues…
  • Subcontractors to several companies connected to the plant have reportedly been offered 80,000 to 100,000 yen a day (£608 to £760) to join the operation, according to one former plant worker. The team of men inside the complex have been dubbed “samurai” and “suicide squads” in the popular press.
  • Hidehiko Nishiyama, deputy director-general of the agency, played down the potential effects of the radioactive seawater as residents in the area had been evacuated and there was no fishing activity in the region.

    “Iodine 131 has a half-life of eight days, and even considering its concentration in marine life, it will have deteriorated considerably by the time it reaches people,” Nishiyama told a news conference.

  • The reason radioactivity can be measured is that radioactive material is escaping. What is dangerous is when that material enters your body and irradiates it from inside. These industry-mouthpiece scholars come on TV and what to they say? They say as you move away the radiation is reduced in inverse ratio to the square of the distance. I want to say the reverse. Internal irradiation happens when radioactive material is ingested into the body. What happens? Say there is a nuclear particle one meter away from you. You breathe it in, it sticks inside your body; the distance between you and it is now at the micron level. One meter is 1000 millimeters, one micron is one thousandth of a millimeter. That’s a thousand times a thousand: a thousand squared. That’s the real meaning of “inverse ratio of the square of the distance.” Radiation exposure is increased by a factor of a trillion. Inhaling even the tiniest particle, that’s the danger.
  • In normal times, Masataka Shimizu lives in The Tower, a luxury high-rise in the same upscale Tokyo district as the U.S. Embassy. But he hasn’t been there for more than two weeks, according to a doorman.
    The Japanese public hasn’t seen much of him recently either. Shimizu, the president of Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco, the company that owns a haywire nuclear power plant 150 miles from the capital, is the most invisible — and most reviled — chief executive in Japan.
    Amid rumors that Shimizu had fled the country, checked into a hospital or committed suicide, company officials said Monday that their boss had suffered an unspecified “small illness” because of overwork after a 9.0-magnitude earthquake sent a tsunami crashing onto his company’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
  • I’ve been eating two family-size bags a day for two years, and little else for the past decade. My shopping trolley looks as if I’m having a children’s party. The idea of eating anything else is repellent; I don’t like being full and bloated, which is how “proper food” makes me feel. I have a tea for breakfast, skip lunch and then I’m ready for my first large bag of crisps at around 4pm and my second bag at 8pm. During the day I’ll have a few cups of tea and sometimes a cola. I don’t get ravenous because my body is used to it after all these years.
  • While testing out the paywall Monday afternoon, Mashable readers Dmitry Beniaminov and Yuri Victor pointed out that it’s breathtakingly easy to subvert the paywall. Readers need only remove “?gwh=numbers” from the URL. They can also clear their browser caches, or switch browsers as soon as they see the subscription prompt. All three of these simple fixes will let them continue reading.
  • Here’s what the Times Square station looked like 25 years ago. The footage was shot with a 16mm film camera in June of ’86, about three years before the MTA officially implemented its “clean train” policy and took subway cars festooned with graffiti out of service. Also of interest, signs for the “K” and “CC” trains.

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Mike Jittlov – The Wizard Of Speed And Time

Born in Los Angeles, Jittlov became a math-language major at UCLA. Jittlov took an animation course to satisfy his art requirement. He made a super-8 film, The Leap, enlarged to 16mm to participate in film festivals in the early 70s. Jittlov entered a 16mm film made for his UCLA class, Good Grief, into Academy Awards competition. That short made it to the professional finals for nomination, the first of several of his short films to do so. Afterwards, Jittlov bought his own 16mm movie camera, designed his own multiplane animation system for $200, and began his career.

Some of his other original film shorts, including The Interview, Swing Shift, Animato, and Time Tripper (released separately and as a collection called Animato) won many top awards and repeat film festival screenings, bringing him to the attention of The Walt Disney Studio. In 1978, Jittlov co-starred on Disney’s two-hour TV extravaganza, Mickey’s 50th, with the short film Mouse Mania, creating and animating the first stop-motion Mickey Mouse, along with 1,000 other Disney toys marching around a psychiatrist’s office. The short is now featured on the Disney DVD Mickey Mouse in Living Color, Volume Two. Since Disney did not allow usually individual creators to receive credit on their television productions (preferring a generic thanks to “the many Disney animators who made this possible”) Mike put his and partner Deven Cheregino’s name on the toys in the final production number, where they couldn’t be edited out. In late 1979, he co-starred again on Disney’s Major Effects television special – this time introducing the world to the 500 mph Green “Wizard of Speed and Time” via the short film version. With an improved soundtrack, the short was released to 16mm film collectors in 1980, along with four of his other short films.

Jittlov is best known for his feature movie The Wizard of Speed and Time, which he directed and starred in. The movie did poorly in theatres but has established a cult following since its release on videotape and laserdisk.

-Wikipedia

Check out his official site for more info: wizworld.com


The Wizard Of Speed And Time

File under Animation, Arts 'n Crafts, Cult Movies, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB

Walk Like A Man

  • Chris Burden’s conceptual performance from the early 1970s. Shot on Super-8, 16mm film, and half-inch video. Guided by the artist’s comments on both the works and the documentative process.
  • The crouching, camouflaged figure is most certainly armed. But few would say he was dangerous.

    Security officials disagreed however when he passed through a scanner at Gatwick Airport.

    His three-inch, plastic toy gun was branded a ‘firearm’ and banned from a transatlantic flight.

  • Thanks Billoney
  • Soon, he told Raw Story in an exclusive interview, Americans will “stop expecting anything of Washington,” turning the US into more of a “banana republic” than a super power.

    Orlov, who witnessed the Soviet Union’s collapse from within, lamented that America’s condition is so severe there is “absolutely nothing” most can do to keep it alive or hasten its demise.

    “Basically the people in this country are powerless,” he suggested. “So they should probably focus on things closer to home.”

    Orlov, born in Leningrad (now known as Saint Petersburg), moved to the United States at age 12 and became an engineer. In his book, he detailed his experiences with the Soviet collapse on numerous visits to Russia in the late 1980s, early 1990s. He covered similarities between the two superpowers in their twilight and suggested ways for Americans to adapt to their new environment.

  • Elias also told investigators he had to keep committing the burglaries so he could afford to pay his attorney a $150 weekly fee to keep him out of jail.
  • A year ago, her 73-year-old sister died from natural causes, prosecutors told Noviy Region news agency. However, instead of reporting the death, the woman preserved the body with gasoline and had been trying the reanimate it ever since.

    Her last macabre experiment on Tuesday night involved “jump starting” the mummified corpse with two wires connecting the body’s hand and neck to the mains.

    Despite what Frankenstein movies suggest, the electric current did not revive the body, instead setting it on fire.

    The surviving sister is now in hospital suffering from burns and smoke inhalation.

  • Eyes look kinda gross up close.
  • While on the lam for 2½ years, a Japanese man wanted for the murder of a British woman says he scissored off his lower lip, dug two moles out of his cheek with a box cutter and gave himself a nose job in an attempt to obscure his identity.
  • US giant General Motors will invest $540 million to produce two low-emission motors in central Mexico, the company announced here Thursday, accompanied by President Felipe Calderon.

    The latest project for GM in Mexico would create 500 direct and another 500 indirect jobs in its plant in Toluca, Calderon said.

    GM has four plants in Mexico, and has invested some $5 billion here since 2006, Calderon said.

    GM was left reeling by an industry slump when the global economic crisis hit. It received 49.5 billion dollars from the US Treasury and emerged from a bankruptcy restructuring in 2009.

  • The body of a Border Collie cross frozen in a block of ice, which was left in the yard of a Dawson Creek man, is under investigation by BC SPCA animal cruelty investigators. It’s possible another animal ate part of the dog’s intestines, but it appears the 18-kilogram (40-pound) dog was owned by somebody because it had a healthy weight. The SPCA wants to find out who was responsible for placing the dog in the block of ice, which looks to have been made using a large rubber bin. The dog was discovered Jan. 15.
  • “Ross sarcastically said to her, ‘Why don’t you … just whore yourself like everyone else around here?” Dranichak, 38, told court.

    “She was absolutely livid, psychotic and immediately started swearing at us. We laughed … and then (her friend) comes up from Euclid and stands next to Ross, saying, ‘Yo, yo, what the f—‘s going on here?'”

    The skinny, 5-foot-9 man joined in and Dranichak said the “loud, irrational” Watts made a scene.

    A second “Middle-Eastern-looking” man also came to the bicyclist’s aid and the shouting match raged on, Dranichak said.

    Both he and Hammond crossed Queen St. to end the conflict.

    Kish, also riding a bike, approached Dranichak. The street people pursued them.
    Dranichak said Kish ran her bike into his surgically repaired knee. He was also sucker-punched and beaten as he lay on the ground.
    Thanks Patrick Nybakken

  • “On drugs, I think that a lot of times we have been so focused on arrests, incarceration, interdiction, that we don’t spend as much time thinking about how we shrink demand,” he said.

    The Associated Press reported last May that “[a]fter 40 years, the United States’ war on drugs has cost $1 trillion and hundreds of thousands of lives, and for what? Drug use is rampant and violence even more brutal and widespread.”

    “The president talks a good game about shifting resources and having a balanced, public health-oriented approach, but it doesn’t square with the budgets he’s submitted to Congress,” said Neill Franklin, a retired Baltimore narcotics cop and executive director of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP).

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