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Earth – Earth 2: Special Low Frequency Version (1993)

Earth Earth 2

Earth – Earth 2: Special Low Frequency Version (1993) #Classic

Earth 2: Special Low Frequency Version is the first full-length studio album by the drone metal band Earth. Produced by Earth and Stuart Hallerman, it was released on February 3, 1993, on Sub Pop Records. The album was influential in the development of drone music and drone metal genres. Celebrated as a “milestone” by Terrorizer’s Dayal Patterson, he described it as “a three-track, 75 minute deluge of feedback and distorted guitars that marked the blueprint for what lead singer/guitarist Dylan Carlson at the time coined ‘ambient metal'” –Wiki

Earth Promo Photo

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Chimp Out!

  • Police say a woman was caught trying to sneak her common-law-husband out of a Mexican prison in a suitcase following a conjugal visit.

    A spokesman for police in the Caribbean state of Quintana Roo says staff at the prison in Chetumal noticed that the woman seemed nervous and was pulling a black, wheeled suitcase that looked bulky.

  • “These stores are trying to trick people into thinking they need an HDMI lead costing over £100 after buying a Full HD TV. This is simply not the case. You shouldn’t be spending more than £4 on an HDMI cable,” it said.

    “An HDMI cable is an HDMI cable,” Kogan added. “It’s a digital cable. You either get a picture or you don’t. Don’t get conned into buying a ‘fancy’ HDMI cable because it will make no difference!”

  • The use of wiretaps is on the rise, according to a government report released Thursday.

    The number of state and federal wiretaps reported swelled by 34 percent from 2009 to 2010, the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts report said. Of the 3,194 wiretaps authorized in 2010, 1,987 were approved by state judges and 1,207 were granted by federal judges. A single application was rejected in 2010.

    More than 80 percent of applications in 2010 involved drug cases. California, New York and New Jersey attributed to 68 percent of the state court applications.

  • Outside, the global position system allows mobile phone users to pinpoint their location with surprising accuracy.

    But indoors, those who are lost are out of luck: GPS satellite signals can’t penetrate roofs.

    Researchers at the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science have determined one way of figuring out your location inside: by letting your phone listen. Their new mobile phone app, called Batphone, allows users to record ambient noise in a room and tag it with an acoustic fingerprint, which allows future users to use that database of fingerprints to determine their location.

  • More than six months have passed since Visa, Mastercard, PayPal, and others cut WikiLeaks’ purse strings. And if that blockade lasts six more days, the secret-spilling group plans to take its financial fight to the courtroom.

    If Visa Europe and MasterCard Europe haven’t re-opened payment WikiLeaks by next Thursday, the group and its payment provider DataCell plan to file a complaint with the E.U. Commission against the two companies as well as the Danish payment processor Teller, according to Sveinn Andri Sveinsson, the Icelandic lawyer for WikiLeaks and DataCell.

    “They’re boycotting Datacell and Wikileaks without any objective justification,” says Sveinsson. “This is clearly an abuse of their market dominance.”

  • Facebook Friend Exporter is a Chrome extension developed by Mohamed Mansour, an open source software engineer, that lets you grab all the information about your Facebook friends so you can import them elsewhere. Because it got popular recently, Facebook noticed and began to block the extension.
  • A BOOBY-trapped car explodes as a bomb disposal expert approaches in a desperate bid to disarm a device inside.

    But incredibly he escaped with his life.

    The man took the full force of the blast yesterday but his heavy body armour saved him from serious injury as the vehicle disintegrated in a cloud of smoke and flame.

  • In the years following the 1979 reactor meltdown at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, more than 50 reactor projects were cancelled across the United States. While many of these reactors had yet to move beyond the planning stages, a number of units that were well into construction were cancelled and abandoned. Closer regulatory scrutiny after the accident combined with a difficult economy to make a host of half-completed projects unviable, and left their wreckage strewn across remote farmland and fog-choked coniferous forests from Tennessee to Washington state.
  • The primate went to investigate the equipment before becoming fascinated with his own reflection in the lens.

    And it wasn’t long before the crested black macaque hijacked the camera and started snapping away sending award-winning photographer David Slater bananas.

    David, 46, said: “One of them must have accidentally knocked the camera and set it off because the sound caused a bit of a frenzy.

    “At first there was a lot of grimacing with their teeth showing because it was probably the first time they had ever seen a reflection.

    “They were quite mischievous jumping all over my equipment, and it looked like they were already posing for the camera when one hit the button.

  • Kyle Richards, 21, claims he is being subjected to cruel and unusual punishment and that his civil rights are being violated at Macomb County Jail.

    In a hand-written lawsuit, Richards said denying his request for erotic material subjects him to a ‘poor standard of living’ and ‘sexual and sensory deprivation’.

    The document describes him as suffering from ‘chronic masturbation syndrome and severe sexual discomfort,’ and Richards argues that he needs pornography to treat his medical condition.

  • Graduates from Royal College of Art have discovered a way to turn hair cuttings, that parlours throw away as waste, into sustainable eyewear named “Hair Glasses”.
  • Throughout the months of lies and misinformation, one story has stuck: “The earthquake knocked out the plant’s electric power, halting cooling to its reactors,” as the government spokesman Yukio Edano said at a March 15 press conference in Tokyo. The story, which has been repeated again and again, boils down to this: “after the earthquake, the tsunami – a unique, unforeseeable [the Japanese word is soteigai] event – then washed out the plant’s back-up generators, shutting down all cooling and starting the chain of events that would cause the world’s first triple meltdown to occur.”

    But what if recirculation pipes and cooling pipes, burst, snapped, leaked, and broke completely after the earthquake — long before the tidal wave reached the facilities, long before the electricity went out? This would surprise few people familiar with the 40-year-old Unit 1, the grandfather of the nuclear reactors still operating in Japan.

  • Then Picard handed me a pair of special glasses. The instant I put them on I discovered that I had got it all terribly wrong. That look of admiration, I realised, was actually confusion and disagreement. Worse, she was bored out of her mind. I became privy to this knowledge because a little voice was whispering in my ear through a headphone attached to the glasses. It told me that Picard was “confused” or “disagreeing”. All the while, a red light built into the specs was blinking above my right eye to warn me to stop talking. It was as though I had developed an extra sense.
  • The brain works differently when memorizing the face of a person from one’s own race than when attempting to remember the face of someone of another race, new biological evidence suggests.

    The well-documented “other-race effect” finds that people are less likely to remember a face from a racial group different from their own. Northwestern University researchers set out to determine what causes this rift in perception and memory by using electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings, which measure brain activity, while participants viewed photos of various faces.

  • al-Qaeda fanatics in Britain are being taught to avoid detection – by pretending to be gay.

    A new terror training manual tells Islamic extremists to lie about their sexuality if a woman approaches them in case she is a “honeytrap” spy sent by security services.

  • Mission Statement: We wanted to apply 365 layers of makeup in one day to see how much is needed to go from a natural look to an outrageous one.
  • The presidential seal fell off US President Barack Obama’s lectern, clattering to the stage, as he delivered a speech at a women’s conference on Tuesday.
  • The report was written by the White House’s Council of Economic Advisors, a group of three economists who were all handpicked by Obama, and it chronicles the alleged success of the “stimulus” in adding or saving jobs. The council reports that, using “mainstream estimates of economic multipliers for the effects of fiscal stimulus” (which it describes as a “natural way to estimate the effects of” the legislation), the “stimulus” has added or saved just under 2.4 million jobs — whether private or public — at a cost (to date) of $666 billion. That’s a cost to taxpayers of $278,000 per job.
  • The Obama campaign website was hacked on Tuesday and invited supporters to two fake anti-government events hosted by an unnamed “Commy Obama.”

    The campaign’s application for mobile devices, such as iPhones and iPads, directed users to two events titled “Rules of Politics” scheduled for noon on Tuesday in Washington.

    “1. Politicians and other public servants lie,” read the event description provided on the Obama campaign website. (Full screenshot here.) “2. Politicians tell you what you want to hear and offer to provide things for ‘free’ to get votes. 3. When government buys, the people pay.”

    The 430-word message lists 21 total anti-government criticisms, none of which target Obama, another politician or a particular political party by name.

  • Ahmed Ezz El-Arab, a vice chairman of Egypt’s Wafd Party, made the remarks in an exclusive interview with The Washington Times last week while in the Hungarian capital attending the Conference on Democracy and Human Rights.

    He denied that the Nazis killed 6 million Jews during World War II.

    “The Holocaust is a lie” Mr. Ezz El-Arab said. “The Jews under German occupation were 2.4 million. So if they were all exterminated, where does the remaining 3.6 million come from?”

    Mr. Ezz El-Arab said he accepted that the Nazis killed “hundreds of thousands” of Jews. “But gas chambers and skinning them alive and all this? Fanciful stories,” he added. (AUDIO: on the Holocaust)

    Mr. Ezz El-Arab also attacked the authenticity of “The Diary of Anne Frank,” which he said he studied as a doctoral student in Stockholm. “I could swear to God it’s a fake,” the Wafd leader said. “The girl was there, but the memoirs are a fake.”

  • The Mayor is challenged under a recall election beginning next month. Accusations have been made. The city council is persecuting the Mayor for giving the people a voice. The Chief of Police is also involved in the scandal.

    Jennifer Jones is given the floor at a city council meeting open to the public. While she is speaking the council realizes she’s about to air their dirty laundry and quickly beckons their henchman to cart her off.

    The Mayor steps in and says Jones has been recognized to speak and has not violated the council’s rules, but the council ignores him and has the woman removed even as the Mayor continues to contest. The police officers ignore the Mayor of the city and remove the woman. It’s obvious who those cops work for, and it’s not the people.

  • If we ever want to turn this country around, we need to be very honest with ourselves. We need to take a long, hard look in the mirror and realize that it is not a good thing that we are number one in divorce, drug addiction, debt, obesity, car thefts, murders and total crimes. We have become a slothful, greedy, decadent nation that is exhibiting signs of advanced decay. Until we understand just how bad our problems really are, we won’t be able to come up with the solutions that we need.

    A lot of people that write articles like this have a deep hatred for America. But that is not the case with me. I love the United States. I love the American people. America is like an aging, bloated rock star that has become addicted to a dozen different drugs. America is a shadow of its former self and it desperately needs to wake up before it plunges into oblivion.

  • The Army’s $2.7 billion computing system designed to share real-time intelligence with troops fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq has hurt, rather than helped, efforts to fight insurgents because it doesn’t work properly, several analysts who have used the system say.
  • The Federal Reserve is primarily concerned with one thing and that is to protect the interests of the banking industry. The Fed has no desire or need to protect the underlying economy. If they can get away with allowing banks to jump from one bubble to another they will do so. The success of the overall economy is only consequential if it aligns with the deeper interests of the banking cabal. This weekend former Fed Chair Alan Greenspan mentioned that simply bailing out Greece was a temporary measure. When pressed he went back into “Greenspeak” and rambled on in his typical obtuse language. The reason why global banks fear Greece is not because of the country itself, but because the country has billions of dollars in debt that global banks hold. These banks do not want to pay for their bad bets and would rather shift the cost to the overall population in general. The Fed balance sheet here in the U.S. is now up to $2.84 trillion, another record that gets no airtime in the press.
  • New research from Cambridge University indicates that a third of people have felt overwhelmed by technology – but children still prefer face-to-face communication
  • Algorithmic editing of the internet
  • Not Even Once of the Day: A couple smokes Salvia without a sober spotter. Everything goes as expected.

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 6, 2011

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Worst Hair Day Ever

  • It’s springtime and flip-flops — the airy sandal with the distinctive thwack-thwack soundtrack — are back, much to the frustration of podiatrists (but to the delight of their billing departments). Wearing flip-flops can cause problems ranging from stubbed toes and cuts to overuse injuries such as foot stress fractures.
  • The population of the world, long expected to stabilize just above 9 billion in the middle of the century, will instead keep growing and may hit 10.1 billion by the year 2100, the United Nations projected in a report released Tuesday.
  • One report in the Journal of Forensic Sciences found that the morphine content of poppy seeds varies widely with poppy seed source. Spanish poppy seeds seem to have the most morphine – about 251 micrograms of morphine per gram of seeds. This translates to about 0.025% morphine by weight.Thus, to get a medically relevant dose of morphine (10 mg) from Spanish poppy seeds you would have to consume…

    morphine content of poppy seeds heroin

    About 40 grams of poppy seeds! It seems like a lot, but how hard would that actually be? A standard baking conversion for dry ingredients is about 8 grams per tablespoon, and one poppy seed bagel probably has, what – a teaspoon or two? By that math, you’d probably have to eat around a dozen poppy seed bagels all at once.

  • A teenage girl who was dropped from her high school’s cheerleading squad after refusing to chant the name of a basketball player who had sexually assaulted her must pay compensation of $45,000 (£27,300) after losing a legal challenge against the decision.
  • The answer, Dr Nelissen and Dr Meijers suspect, is the same as why the peacock with the best tail gets all the girls. People react to designer labels as signals of underlying quality. Only the best can afford them. To test that idea, they checked how people responded to a logo they knew had cost the wearer nothing. To do this, they asked their volunteers to play a social-dilemma game, in which both sides can benefit from co-operating, but only at the risk of being taken advantage of.
  • Dunk-a-roos, about 5 pounds’ worth You may remember these from the early ’90s — packs of kangaroo-shaped cookies with chocolate or vanilla frosting used as a dipping sauce. The fridge had at least 10 different packages of the things, including out-of-print vintage varieties (double fudge cookies with strawberry frosting, for example).

    About the Dunk-a-roos, he wrote:

    “Don’t know what 2 say about Dunk-a-roos. They’re just good! Sometimes you want a food that is comfortable and takes you back. For me, it’s those crazy little kangaroo crackers.”

  • A West Virginia man found wearing women’s underwear and standing over a goat’s carcass told police he was high on bath salts.
  • Psychedelic Piss
  • Thirty-five-year-old Brett Henderson of St. Paris in western Ohio faces charges of public indecency and obstructing official business. Police tell media outlets he refused to stop running during Sunday morning’s Flying Pig Marathon, so they halted him with a stun gun.Henderson’s mother Lee said Monday that he had borrowed a pair of running shorts from his father, but they kept slipping down as he ran. She says he kept running without shorts because he was determined to complete the race he had trained for.

  • A flurry of small studies suggest that sex is as good for your health as vitamin D and broccoli. It not only relieves stress, improves sleep and burns calories, it can also reduce pain, ease depression, strengthen blood vessels, boost the immune system and lower the risk of prostate and breast cancer.
  • For the first time in 20 years, the number of homes in the United States with television sets has dropped.
  • Did Osama bin Laden win? No. Did he succeed? Well, America is still standing, and he isn’t. So why, when I called Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, a counterterrorism expert who specializes in al-Qaeda, did he tell me that “bin Laden has been enormously successful”? There’s no caliphate. There’s no sweeping sharia law. Didn’t we win this one in a clean knockout?Apparently not. Bin Laden, according to Gartenstein-Ross, had a strategy that we never bothered to understand, and thus that we never bothered to defend against. What he really wanted to do — and, more to the point, what he thought he could do — was bankrupt the United States of America. After all, he’d done the bankrupt-a-superpower thing before. And though it didn’t quite work out this time, it worked a lot better than most of us, in this exultant moment, are willing to admit.

  • The owners of the Nine Mile Point Unit 1 this morning are trying to figure out why the recently refueled nuclear reactor automatically shut down at 8:51 p.m. Monday.The plant responded according to design and automatically shut down with all rods that control the nuclear reaction fully inserting into the reactor, Constellation Energy Nuclear Group said this morning.

  • The narrator says that this happened around 2 o’clock in the afternoon of April 25th, that the man was “seeking justice” and began throwing bricks from the second floor of a building. The neighborhood security and police rushed to the scene and began trying to persuade the man on the roof to stop. Two hours later when efforts to persuade the man had no effect, the fire department inflated an air rescue cushion (aka jump cushion) below. The neighborhood security guard then, under instructions from the police, pushed the man off the edge of the building’s roof where the man then fell down onto the edge of the jump cushion. Police then apprehended the man and the matter is case is currently under investigation.
  • Designed for “communication in the mouth”, the invention consists of a motion-sensing recepticle that records your tongue’s movements. The saucy information is then transmited across the Internet to a corresponding machine in your partner’s mouth.In other words, even if the recipient is on the other side of the world, they will be able to feel your kiss.

  • Anonymous is the name of a grass-roots cyber group that in December launched attacks that temporarily shut down the sites of MasterCard Inc (MA.N) and Visa Inc(V.N) using simple software tools available for free over the Internet.The group attacked the two credit card companies with denial-of-service attacks that overwhelmed their servers for blocking payments to WikiLeaks.

    Sony said on Wednesday that Anonymous targeted it several weeks ago using a denial-of-service attack in protest of Sony defending itself against a hacker in federal court in San Francisco.

    The attack that stole the personal data of millions of Sony customers was launched separately, while the company was distracted protecting itself against the denial-of-service campaign, Sony said.

  • A California man finds relaxation in role-playing as an infant.
  • The theme music was created in 1963 by the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, a poorly-funded department charged with making ghostly or wacky sound effects for the Beeb’s radio and TV programs. From this modest assignment, they explored the fringes of sound and stretched the the idea of what music could be. Ignored for decades by music historians, the now defunct Workshop has in recent years gained a reputation as one of the forebears of electronica, psychedelia, ambient music and synth pop.
  • Based on reports published by China’s space agency, Sergio Toscano, director for Astronomical Research in Missions, said that behind the comet Elenin could be approaching a UFO. “Behind the comet, discovered in December last year, Chinese scientists say that is something they called cluster, which means globular cluster, or perhaps alien spacecraft,” said Toscano.According to the report quotes the astronomer mission, the space body would be found in the comet’s tail and was analyzed after the mysterious signals that came off of an unknown formation “strange and obscure.”

    In the words of Toscano, the Chinese have said that the spacecraft is stationed in the same place for ninety days, “before that looked like it was coming from an extraterrestrial civilization,” said Argentine scientist.

  • It has been 25 years since Halley’s Comet last passed through the inner solar system, but an annual meteor shower keeps the icy wanderer’s legacy on Earth alive this week.Halley’s Comet takes roughly 75 years to circle the sun, but if you’re 30 years old or younger, you either have little or no memory of this famous cosmic vagabond’s 1986 trip by Earth. And your next chance will come in the summer of 2061.

    But if you don’t want to wait until 2061, you might want to step outside before sunrise during these next few mornings and try to catch a view of some “cosmic litter” that has been left behind in space by Halley’s comet — a summer display of “shooting stars.”

  • Physicists at the University of Geneva in Switzerland have devised a new kind of quantum experiment using humans as photon detectors, and in doing so have made the quantum phenomenon of entanglement visible to the naked eye for the first time.For those that need a primer, entanglement is that strange quantum phenomenon that links two particles across distances such that any any measurements carried out on one particle immediately changes the properties of the other–even if they are separated by the entire universe. Einstein called it “spooky action at a distance.” And indeed it is weird.

  • Intelligence agencies combing through computers and storage devices found at Osama bin Laden’s compound expect a “gold mine” of data that could expose terror plots, Al-Qaeda figures’ locations and funding sources, ex-US officials said Wednesday.The trove of material hauled away after bin Laden was killed in a US raid on Sunday — about five computers, 10 hard drives and 100 storage devices — represents a dramatic intelligence breakthrough for the United States in its fight against Al-Qaeda, said the experts.

  • Thanks DaddyIssues
  • Russian children who are barely in their teens could face drug tests at school as the country has a severe problem with the number of addicts — and most start their habit early. All Russians can take a drug test voluntarily, but if Russian President Dmitry Medvedev has his way, hundreds of thousands of students — and even schoolchildren as young as 13 — will face mandatory testing.
  • At UC Berkeley, “white alienation on campus is a legitimate concern,” according to a recent article about efforts to promote tolerance amongst racial groups.“On this campus, there are so many groups for people of color and so many spaces where people can talk to their people about their issues,” Anjna Champaneri, a Cal Housing resident director said. “Where does a white student go?”

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Binaural Beats To Blow Yer Brains

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