Amputation | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Goin’ Hog Wild

  • Nick said: “We were stunned.

    “I thought, ‘My God what is it?’ It’s like nothing we have ever seen – it almost looks prehistoric.”

    The couple, who were walking their dogs at Bridge of Don, Aberdeen, called coastguards to investigate.

  • BHOPAL: This real life incident has the making of a scene from some vampire movie. A 22-year-old woman in Damoh district of Madhya Pradesh has told the police that her husband drank her blood for the past three years. “He used to take a syringe and draw blood from my arms,” Deepa Ahirwar said. “He would then empty it in a glass and drink it. For three years he did this on a regular basis, threatening me of dire consequences if I revealed this to anyone.”
  • According to the lawsuit, Dr. Anthony Pickett performed the circumcision on the boy, now 8, at the Maternity Center of Vermont on Jan. 3, 2003. Pickett used a Miltex Mogen clamp that removed 85 percent of the top of the boy’s penis, according to the suit.

    “Because of the defective design of the circumcision clamp, there was no protection for the head of the penis and Dr. Pickett was unable to visualize the (head) when excising the foreskin,” according to the plaintiffs’ court papers filed regarding the settlement. “For this reason, an amputation to the (head) of plaintiff’s penis occurred.”

  • Owning yeast and sugar isn’t enough to get you arrested in most places. But in some communities of rural Alaska, the high rate of alcohol abuse has caused voters to ban booze along with possession of the supplies to make it at home.

    A recent case highlights a 2007 state law that makes it illegal for a person to possess yeast and sugar in a local option community if they intend to use the ingredients to make home-brew, a cloudy, intoxicating liquid often mixed with fruit juice. Villages have the option to ban booze as one way to combat to a longstanding epidemic of alcohol-related injuries and deaths in rural Alaska.

  • A Japanese rock musician who tried to hang himself after being arrested for unruly behaviour on a flight to the Mariana Islands has died in hospital, reports say.

    Rocker Taiji Sawada, who was best known as the former bass player with heavy metal group “X”, died yesterday when medics at Saipan’s Commonwealth Health Centre turned off his life support, the Saipan Tribune reported.

    The Marianas Variety newspaper reported that Sawada, 45, had been in intensive care since July 14 after he tried to hang himself with a bedsheet in a jail in the US-administered Pacific territory.

    He had been arrested three days before for allegedly assaulting a female cabin crew attendant during a Delta Airlines flight from Tokyo to Saipan, court documents showed.

  • After 15 years of market growth…[dealers] were finding it harder to sell drugs, as pay cuts, tax rises and job losses left recreational users with less money. The Irish gangs were unable to shift larger hauls and, in any case, lacked the resources to buy in bulk, so they were ordering smaller quantities. This liquidity crisis was an unfamiliar problem for criminals used to having a river of money at their disposal.

    User arrests are down by 20% in recent years and the value of drugs seized—used as a proxy for market size—has hit 15-year lows. This demand elasticity is evident in both hard and soft drug markets: the value of cocaine seized last year is less than half that of previous years, marijuana’s a tenth of its 2006 peak. Even heroin junkies have economised; the value of seized heroin has fallen more than 85% since 2008.

  • Eight illegal immigrants from Mexico were arrested on drug trafficking charges after federal and Las Vegas law enforcement officials seized 212 pounds of drugs worth an estimated street value of $5.7 million in the largest methamphetamine bust in Nevada history, authorities announced Thursday.

    Police also seized $280,000 in cash, six guns and nine vehicles used for drug trafficking after searching nine residential properties in Las Vegas and Henderson on Tuesday.

    Law enforcement officials heralded the record bust as a significant blow to Las Vegas’ illegal underground that would be felt by every player, including drug bosses, small-time dealers and users hoping to score on the street. The raid yielded four pounds of heroin and 208 pounds of methamphetamine in varying stages of processing, from its liquid form to the crystal-like pieces sold on the street in small quantities for consumption.

  • There was a time when a mushroom cloud billowing over the Nevada desert was celebrated as a symbol of American strength — and, about 75 miles southeast in Las Vegas, as a terrific tourist draw.

    In the 1950s, casinos threw “dawn parties,” where gamblers caroused until a flash signaled the explosion of an atomic bomb at the Nevada Test Site. Tourism boosters promoted the Atomic Cocktail (vodka, brandy, champagne and a dash of sherry) and pinups such as Miss Atomic Blast, who was said to radiate “loveliness instead of deadly atomic particles.”

    Sixty years after the first atmospheric tests here, the 1,375-square-mile site continues to be a tourist magnet, though of a far different nature. Thousands of people each year sign up months in advance to see what is essentially a radioactive ghost town.

  • If your heritage is non-African, you are part Neanderthal, according to a new study in the July issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution. Discovery News has been reporting on human/Neanderthal interbreeding for some time now, so this latest research confirms earlier findings.

    Damian Labuda of the University of Montreal’s Department of Pediatrics and the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center conducted the study with his colleagues. They determined some of the human X chromosome originates from Neanderthals, but only in people of non-African heritage.

    “This confirms recent findings suggesting that the two populations interbred,” Labuda was quoted as saying in a press release. His team believes most, if not all, of the interbreeding took place in the Middle East, while modern humans were migrating out of Africa and spreading to other regions.

  • Some close to Bachmann fear she won’t be equal to the stress of the campaign, much less the presidency itself.

    “When she gets ‘em, frankly, she can’t function at all. It’s not like a little thing with a couple Advils. It’s bad,” the adviser says. “The migraines are so bad and so intense, she carries and takes all sorts of pills. Prevention pills. Pills during the migraine. Pills after the migraine, to keep them under control. She has to take these pills wherever she goes.”

    To staff, Bachmann has implausibly blamed the headaches on uncomfortable high-heel shoes, but those who have worked closely with her cite stress, a busy schedule and anything going badly for Bachmann as causes.

  • “I have to say, marijuana saved my life,” Lynx told me. “I would probably be dead if I didn’t have it.” She discovered pot while recovering from her cancer treatments. She’d been prescribed morphine and OxyContin, which she quit cold turkey. One day when she was having a bout of nausea, a friend offered her a toke. She was reluctant at first. The girls’ biological father had been “a druggie” when they were young, Lynx said.

    But the drug worked wonders, and soon Lynx became one of the first five minors to get a medical marijuana card in Montana. Now Lamb has one, too.

    Pot has also helped the twins rekindle the creative impulses they once channeled into their music. They’ve both taken up painting — astrological themes, mostly — and Lynx restores furniture. They hope to enroll in college, and intend to dedicate themselves to making medical marijuana legal in all 50 states.

  • Within 20 minutes of arriving through his front door she had flagged down a car and caught a train. He found out she had also run up a £500 bill on his mobile phone.

    Heartbroken Mr Gannon, who married Patrice in Jamaica early this year, believes his new wife fled to Bristol to meet a Jamaican boyfriend with whom she had organised the scheme.

  • Yesterday, historian and author Barry H. Landau was arrested on charges of stealing historical documents, including ones signed by Abraham Lincoln, from the Maryland Historical Society. The arrest eventually led to Landau’s locker, where police found upwards of 60 documents worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    Laudau’s heist and the tremendous value of the stolen documents got us thinking about the other end of the literature theft spectrum: what are the most frequently stolen books from bookstores?

    The results are surprisingly consistent–the same books and authors keep getting stolen across the country, so much so that many of them are frequently shelved behind the counter. Here are 5 of the most frequently stolen books, with sources listed below.

  • The main ingredients are melatonin, a hormone that is intended to induce drowsiness; L-theanine, an amino acid primarily found in green tea; GABA, a chemical that calms the mind; B vitamins, and chamomile — a plant that often winds up as tea that people drink to help them unwind.
  • Rupert Murdoch, the Chairman and CEO of News Corporation, was the target of “a white foam pie” attack on Tuesday as he was testifying before a British Parliament committee about the News of the World phone hacking scandal.
  • Apparently, the white boy was in the wrong country.
    Treat the non-whites in white countries like kings and queens but don’t receive the same treatment in their country, a bit funny, isn’t it?
    The poor little kid… If I knew who he was, I would raise him, I’m still not sure if he’s dead or alive, such a poor kid… another kid bites the dust from non-whites action as always.
    He is white, why does people get upset when I mention the word WHITE?
    This is life, accept it.
    The Chinese people are saying “white boy, go home, go away”.
  • An electronic DOT road sign was apparently hacked when a displayed message read “Impeach Obama.”
  • After inhaling a mall-bought batch of “Iaroma”—a synthetic pot substitute sold as ‘incense’—a 19-year-old Chicago boy dies after taking a 100 mph joyride into a neighbor’s house.
  • Baphomet is an enigmatic, goat-headed figure found in several instance in the history of occultism. From the Knights Templar of the Middle-Ages and the Freemasons of the 19th century to modern currents of occultism, Baphomet never fails to create controversy. But where does Baphomet originate from and, most importantly, what is the true meaning of this symbolic figure? This article looks at the origins of Baphomet, the esoteric meaning of Baphomet and its occurrence in popular culture.
  • The man, John Blanchard, was allegedly smoking crystal meth at the storage yard near his camper when he left a propane torch ignited on the ground, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

    The torch flame lit a container of gunpowder Blanchard was apparently stockpiling, causing an explosion.

    A loaded rifle was recovered from the scene as was more gunpowder and 300 feet of detonation cord found in an open safe, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

  • Amid news that troubled rap veteran Earl “DMX” Simmons had allegedly been caught smuggling contraband into prison thus extending his sentence, a spokesperson from the Arizona Department of Corrections has decried the erroneous reports that the rapper committed the said offense.

    Barrett Marson, the media contact that dismissed the reports, gave a quote to website Rumorfix stating, “He did not smuggle drugs into prison. He failed a drug test, I don’t know what drugs he took, but that’s it. He was due to be released today but will now be released on July 19th.” Prison records show that DMX was not exactly a model prisoner with several disciplinary write-ups including drug test failure, disorderly conduct and possession of drugs.

  • Mota went to speak with the driver, who said he was there to deal with the lack of a license plate. Mota smelled marijuana inside the vehicle, he said.

    Officers found the 17 pounds in large plastic containers and called county narcotics officers to investigate.

    The driver indicated he had paperwork for possessing medical marijuana but 17 pounds is well over allowable limits, Mota said.

  • Mortgage industry employees are still signing documents they haven’t read and using fake signatures more than eight months after big banks and mortgage companies promised to stop the illegal practices that led to a nationwide halt of home foreclosures.

    County officials in at least three states say they have received thousands of mortgage documents with questionable signatures since last fall, suggesting that the practices, known collectively as “robo-signing,” remain widespread in the industry.

  • The Army refuses to release information on its investigation into whether a three-star general conducted psychological operations on members of Congress during their visits to Afghanistan, according to the two Army information operations officers at the center of the controversy.
    Michael Holmes, the officer who says he refused orders to conduct Psy-Ops on American officials, and Laurel Levine filed a federal FOIA complaint, saying the Army and the U.S. Army Central Command refused to release the records.
    Holmes and Levine says the Army investigation “also covered allegations of whistleblower retaliation conducted against the plaintiffs for challenging unlawful orders.”
  • Bad hoodoo from the Jessamine County Fair. Dark times. A champion laid low. On Wednesday, David L. Warner Jr., of Nicholasville, Ky., drove a beaut of a derby in the ultra-competitive small car class. Warner demolished many things on his way to the title. But instead of getting to enjoy his victory, Warner got busted for DUI. The champion had allegedly been pounding Bud Lights before the derby, according to a whole bunch of dirty snitches who ratted him out to the cops.
  • Human rights lawyers are seeking an arrest warrant against a former CIA legal director who allegedly approved drone attacks in Pakistan that killed hundreds.
    It’s claimed John Rizzo agreed on a list of people to be targeted by drone strikes – a practice which started in 2004 under the Bush administration. For more on this RT joined by Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer.
  • Julia Sullivan wants to be a cheerleader.

    She likes to dance. She wants to get people excited for games. She has friends on the cheerleading squad.

    “I just think it would be fun,” the 16-year-old said.

    So she’s practiced. Her older sister, a former cheerleader, helped her figure out ways she could cheer from her wheelchair. Julia, who’ll be a junior at Aurora High School this fall, was born without legs and with arms that stop short of her elbows.

    This spring, for the third time, she tried out to be a cheerleader. For the third time, she didn’t made the squad.

    Last month, she and her parents, Mike and Carolyn Sullivan, asked the Aurora school board to correct what they see as “scoring errors” in her tryout evaluations this spring, saying she was given no accommodation for her disability.

    Their attorney cited the Americans With Disabilities Act and other federal laws that prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities.

  • On June 1, the Taliban raided the Taliban crossed the border from Afghanistan and raided the Shaltalu area of the district of Dir in northwestern Pakistan. This video shows the execution of more than a dozen Pakistani policemen who were captured during the fighting. The Taliban leader gives a speech prior to executing the Pakistani men:

    “These are the enemies of Islam who originated from Pakistan. They are the Pakistani police, soldiers and their supporters who recently lined up six kids in Swat and shot them execution style. These Pakistanis are now our captive and we will avenge the death of the children by doing the same to them.”

  • There has been speculation for months now that the House Republicans’ transportation bill proposal would be terrible for transit, biking, and walking. And sure enough, John Mica didn’t disappoint.

    The chair of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee yesterday released a six-year reauthorization proposal that would slash overall transportation funding 33 percent and eliminate dedicated funds for biking and walking.

  • That then gave them access across large parts of the News International network, possibly including the archived emails, and to the Sun’s “content management system” (CMS) – which formats news onto pages. That will have included the code for the “breaking news” element of the Sun’s main webpage; changing the entire content on the page would be too obvious.

    By including a line of Javascript in the “breaking news” element, the hackers were able to ensure that anyone visiting the Sun’s home page would, as the ticker was automatically refreshed, they would be redirected to anywhere that the hackers chose.

    Initially they made it redirect to a fake page they had created at new-times.co.uk/sun which attempted to look and read like a Sun story claiming that Rupert Murdoch had been found dead. That page used a template of another story that first appeared on 14 July, suggesting that the hackers either grabbed an archived story or have had access since then.

  • Video – Rep. Jan Schakowsky On WLS Chicago – July 13, 2011The proof comes at the 3:20 mark, but the entire clip is worth seeing.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under Culture, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 20, 2011

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

If You See Something, Say Something

  • The war on drugs has helped make the U.S. the world’s largest incarcerator.

    America’s criminal justice system should keep communities safe, treat people fairly, and use fiscal resources wisely. But more Americans are deprived of their liberty than ever before – unfairly and unnecessarily, with no benefit to public safety. Especially in the face of economic crisis, our government should invest in alternatives to incarceration and make prisons options of last – not first – resort.

  • Taxpayers have spent more than $4 billion on capital punishment in California since it was reinstated in 1978, or about $308 million for each of the 13 executions carried out since then, according to a comprehensive analysis of the death penalty’s costs.
  • U.S. Airways has landed in hot water for allowing a scantily-clad drag queen to fly without hassle just a week before crews booted a college football player off a plane for wearing saggy pants.

    The gray-haired cross dresser boarded a June 9 flight from Fort Lauderdale to Phoenix wearing a little more than stiletto heels, thigh-high black stocking and tiny, electric blue panties, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

    Witnesses said passengers complained about the flamboyant flyer, but U.S. Air let him board because the company doesn’t have any rules against showing skin.

  • Radioactive tritium has leaked from three-quarters of U.S. commercial nuclear power sites, often into groundwater from corroded, buried piping, an Associated Press investigation shows.

    The number and severity of the leaks has been escalating, even as federal regulators extend the licenses of more and more reactors across the nation.

    Tritium, which is a radioactive form of hydrogen, has leaked from at least 48 of 65 sites, according to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission records reviewed as part of the AP’s yearlong examination of safety issues at aging nuclear power plants. Leaks from at least 37 of those facilities contained concentrations exceeding the federal drinking water standard – sometimes at hundreds of times the limit.

  • Former MoveOn.org Executive Director Eli Pariser (a name you may recognize from your inbox) explains how sites such as Facebook and Google are quietly creating a personalized Internet that removes content that may be challenging, uncomfortable or important.

    Pariser has written a book on the subject called “The Filter Bubble,” and breaks down the idea in the TED talk below. In one troubling example, he has two demographically similar friends Google the word Egypt. One gets news about the revolution while the other gets travel-themed results and nothing about political upheaval.

  • “Thinking that Facebook is forever is like thinking that AOL was the be-all-end-all of the Internet,” he says. “Eventually, everyone will use something else.”
  • There’s something new for us to worry about: Blackberry neck.

    It’s not a condition caused by drinking too many smoothies – it’s the formation of neck creases that may be (repeat, may be) formed by repeatedly looking down, again and again to send text messages and emails on your favorite cell phone or texting device.

  • Hustler Magazine will pay a $375,000 penalty for publishing nude photographs of Nancy Benoit after she was murdered by her professional wrestler husband, who then committed suicide, a federal judge ruled.
    Authorities discovered the bodies of Nancy Benoit, her 7-year-old son and her husband, Chris, at their Fayetteville, Ga., home in June 2007. Investigators quickly concluded that Chris, a wrestler with World Wrestling Entertainment, strangled his wife and son, placed a Bible next to their bodies, and then hanged himself.
    In the wake of the grisly discovery, Larry Flynt Publishing Group bought 20-year-old nude photos of Nancy, who was a former model and professional wrestler, and published them in the March 2008 issue of Hustler.
    Nancy’s family filed suit, claiming that Hustler exploited Nancy’s tragic death for financial gain by publishing the images, which were taken when she was 20 years old.
  • Some people I have mentioned this concern to have essentially accused me of heresy and paranoia because “there is no way Apple would do that to their users”. Apple would not have to. They would simply have to comply with an information demand from the RIAA, who has had no problem with being seen as the bad guy in hardball enforcement against file sharing. Moreover consider this:

    Apple is the largest music retailer on the planet.
    Apple believes, possibly justifiably, that it loses billions of dollars annually to illegal music file sharing.
    The easiest way out of the legal jam over challenged content in your iCloud storage would be to convert the suspected iCloud music by buying it from Apple. Apple becomes almost like a white knight in the process.

  • What’s the deal with the ‘bagel-head’ look? How do you get that effect?
    Oh, you just press your thumb in to the middle of the forehead while the saline is being pumped in, and that creates the donut, bagel effect. I’ve read reports of people coloring the infusions as well but I don’t think there’s any truth to those claims, it must be the way the light is shining on someone in the photo, or something.In your opinion, are saline infusions the most extreme thing happening in the Japanese body modification scene at the moment?
    Oh, no, not at all. There are practices that are far more extreme, for example, ear pointing, navel removal, amputation, Japanese traditional body suit tattoos… 

  • A motel known for touting its heart-shaped Jacuzzi for years quietly housed dozens of registered sex offenders and predators.

    The Budget Inn on North Federal Highway was one of the few housing options for sex offenders in the city. That is, until the motel’s owner learned of the tenants’ criminal records this past week and evicted them.
    On Friday, 24 offenders were listed on the state’s sex offender registry as living at the 50-room motel just south of Oakland Park Boulevard.

  • Up for that shiny new job and cleared the first round of background checks? Might want to double check that you haven’t had any lewd behavior online because the FTC (News – Alert) just gave the green light to include your Facebooking habits in your job screen.

    No longer are employers relying on a quick Google search to find dirt on prospective employees. Now hiring managers are looking to Facebook (News – Alert) posts. In fact, according to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, Social Intelligence Corp. has been given the legal thumbs up to archive seven years worth of your Facebook posts. These archives will be used as part of their background checking service for job applicants.

  • It’s all downhill from here!
  • A group of US representatives plan to introduce legislation that will legalize marijuana and allow states to legislate its use, pro-marijuana groups said Wednesday.

    The legislation would limit the federal government’s role in marijuana enforcement to cross-border or inter-state smuggling, and allow people to legally grow, use or sell marijuana in states where it is legal.

    The bill, which is expected to be introduced on Thursday by Republican Representative Ron Paul and Democratic Representative Barney Frank, would be the first ever legislation designed to end the federal ban on marijuana.

    Sixteen of the 50 states as well as the District of Columbia have legalized the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

  • Even though local farmers have not tested their soil and water, Nita Abbott of LA Farms, near Gambo, expressed an interest in having her land tested to ensure they’re selling a safe product. The newspaper contacted private testing companies, government agencies, and universities to inquire if they would consider testing local farms. All of them said they were not interested in getting involved at any level. Health Canada also reported that everything is normal.

    Even though no official testing has been done in central Newfoundland, Ms. Abbott speculated, “I guess they feel they don’t have evidence to take it further.”

  • A Southwest Airlines pilot has been suspended after broadcasting a slur-filled rant about flight attendants over an air-traffic control frequency that stopped controllers from contacting other aircraft.

    The profanity-laced rant meant controllers were unable to contact other aircraft for several minutes potentially putting lives at risk.

    The Southwest Airlines pilot launched into a swear laced tirade about gay, overweight and older flight attendants on a flight passing over Houston, Texas.

    The pilot complained that most flight attendants weren’t acceptable dating prospects for him.

    ‘It was a continuous stream of gays, grannies and grandes,’ the pilot said.

    The recording was obtained by the Houston Chronicle from the Federal Aviation Authority.

    The pilot, who has not been named, had accidentally turned on his microphone while talking to his co-pilot.

  • Imagine yourself enjoying the great outdoors when, all of a sudden, nature calls. With no bathroom in sight, what’s a city slicker to do? How does one properly relieve oneself in the woods?

    That’s the question Montana-based wilderness enthusiast Kathleen Meyer has been trying to answer for the past two decades in her book “How To Shit In The Woods: An Environmentally Sound Approach To A Lost Art” (Ten Speed Press).

    The so-called “backcountry bible,” originally published in 1989, is a quirky yet useful guide for nature lovers who might need to poop in the wild.

  • The whereabouts of about 30 subcontractors who helped deal with the crisis at the crippled Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant is unknown, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare said on June 20.
  • After fluoride, another (and even more powerful) brain-altering product might appear in drinking water: lithium. Known for its “lobotomizing” properties, lithium would be a great way to create a nation of zombies. Who’s for it?
  • Simple microbes such as those found in baker’s yeast can be modified to make LSD, suggests research by Harvard scientists
  • Saraswati taught his devotees to resist worldly temptations, including “illicit lust.” Already, however, his own behavior with his female devotees was apparently less than holy. “One day he called me into his room,” remembers Diane Hendel, a former ISDL devotee in California. “He was sitting on the bed and he asked me to come closer and he tried to French kiss me. He grabbed me and he put his hands all over my breasts and he stuck his tongue in my mouth.” After Hendel says she pushed away, Saraswati told her it was a blessing to be so close with the guru. When she quit ISDL soon thereafter, he was not pleased. “He told me I would have many lifetimes as an insect, if I left him,” she remembers.
  • Silly gifs of animals being jerks.
    Thanks Tim Barber
  • ​A 36-year-old Ogden, Utah, man named Jason Valdez has taken social networking to unprecedented levels by updating his Facebook status to reflect that he had taken a woman named Veronica hostage in a motel after the cops tried to give him a warrant for a felony drug offense. He then held her for 16 hours, status updates all the way, including one with a photo of the two of them — he comments, “Got a cute ‘Hostage’ huh.” The standoff ended when a SWAT team stormed the room and Valdez shot himself in the chest. He’s now in critical condition.
  • Samples of icy spray shooting from Saturn’s moon Enceladus collected during Cassini spacecraft flybys show the strongest evidence yet for the existence of a large-scale, subterranean saltwater ocean, says a new international study led by the University of Heidelberg and involving the University of Colorado Boulder.
  • Cocaine used to just get you high. Now it rots your skin.

    Doctors say the cocaine hitting the streets in New York and Los Angeles is now cut with a drug that veterinarians use to de-worm livestock, causing cokeheads’ skin to rot off.

  • A new sex education program being introduced in Basel this year includes a “sex box” with wooden penises and fabric vaginas. The curriculum goes too far for some parents and politicians.
  • The “thermal injuries,” police said, were consistent with those documented in cases from Dayton, Ohio; New Kent County, Va., and Galveston, Texas. Detectives researched those cases and awaited the findings of the Sacramento County coroner’s office.

    “Based on that research and the autopsy results,” the department said in a statement, “detectives believe the injuries occurred as a result of the child being burned in a microwave oven.”

  • It was Friday the 13th, and Skylar Walters thought he was going to die.

    The 16-year-old inmate of Orangeville Jr.-Sr. High in Illinois was in gym class when a deranged-looking man barged into the school and began firing what appeared to be a handgun at several of the other students.

    “I started praying to God and saying my last words,” Skylar later recalled. “I was scared. I didn’t know what to do.”

    As the intruder fired his gun, he called out the name of a particular student; the youngster quite sensibly fled the building. Other kids “were just running everywhere and crying and hiding,” Skylar recounted. Some of the panicking schoolkids probably attempted to call or text their parents to describe the horror unfolding in front of them. They didn’t know that each of the parents had been instructed not to answer if his child issued a desperate plea for help.

  • Based on the “Manifesto for Conscious Men,” a collectively-written document from a number of men who feel deep appreciation for the gifts of the feminine as a balance to those of the masculine. This document acknowledges many thousands of years of dominance of masculine power, and offers an apology for the suppression of women, in the spirit of a fresh start. The authors do not advocate the domination of men by women or feminine energy, but feel that a balance and equal respect for both energies will allow for a new wave of evolution on our planet.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under Horror, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on June 23, 2011

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Not Sane For Work

  • I’ll be honest, I had some trouble with this request. I thought I’d seen some messed up stuff on the internet, but something about bugs really gets to me. Oh well, to each their own
  • A Chinese company has unveiled a sex robot which it claims can recognise – and even chat to – its owner.

    The 5ft 5ins robot has realistic skin and muscles made of silicon gel on an advanced medical metal skeleton.

    Love Sex Company manager Li Jian said the £3,000 robots were aimed at well-paid executives who were too busy to meet real women.

    Customers could choose the face and figure of their robot which would be programmed to recognise its owner’s face and hold conversations with him, or her, in a choice of languages.

    It can also be controlled remotely to take up different positions and some body parts can even shake, added Li.

  • His 186-pound tumor is record-breaking, but the size of his smile is what’s really remarkable about Nguyen Duy Hai.

    The 31-year-old Vietnamese man has had a tumor growing on his right leg since soon after he was born.

    Despite having an amputation at the knee 14 years ago, he still has a growth wider than three feet.

  • In reality, in China, the word kung fu can also relate to non-martial arts contexts and can come to mean any individual accomplishment or skill cultivated through long and hard work.

    Bai Dengchun, age 23, who hails from northern China’s Shandong Province, can throw cards with such force and accuracy that from as far as 16 feet away he can slice a cucumber or burst a balloon. He can also crack an egg or knock off the end of a lit cigarette from a smoker’s mouth.

  • Baltimore police confirmed that the officer was riding in the passenger seat of an unmarked patrol car Wednesday while cruising down Hanover Street when he felt something on the back of his neck.

    The officer swiped at his neck and discovered the big rodent crawling up his back, police said. The rat bit his palm and thumb before the officer was able to throw it out of the car window.

  • A 55 feet long fish has been found in the seashore of Guangdong, China.

    According to a local newspaper, the big fish weighs at least 10,000 pounds.

    Hwang, a 66-years-old fisherman living in the near area, said he has never seen anything like this in his whole life and that the fish was tied with ropes when it was first found.

  • Thousands of bicyclists took to the streets of Portland, Oregon on Saturday night, riding in hordes across meandering avenues of asphalt on their two-wheelers.

    As 20-somethings populate the Pacific Northwest hipster hub and rally for bicyclists rights and recognition of their rides, is it really all that weird? Not quite. Until you do it bare-ass naked, that is. That’s what most of them did on Saturday’s moon-lit annual installment of the World Naked Bike Ride.

  • Iraq’s parliament speaker tells Al Jazeera unaccounted reconstruction money is three times the reported $6.6bn.
  • In a new report, they warn that ocean life is “at high risk of entering a phase of extinction of marine species unprecedented in human history”.

    They conclude that issues such as over-fishing, pollution and climate change are acting together in ways that have not previously been recognised.

    The impacts, they say, are already affecting humanity.

  • Initially an announcement on the underground barrier was due to be made to the press on June 14, but it was put off until after TEPCO’s general shareholders meeting on June 28.

    In the meantime, the state of the nuclear power plant continues to deteriorate and radioactive materials are eerily spreading and contaminating the area around the plant.

    Which is more important: upholding share prices or stopping pollution? The Japanese political and business world has sunk to a level where it can’t even answer such a question.

  • Representing the first time the substance has been detected at the crippled plant, the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) reported on Sunday that seawater and groundwater samples taken near the ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility in Japan have tested positive for radioactive strontium. And according to a recent report in The Japan Times, levels of strontium detected were up to 240 times over the legal limit, indicating a serious environmental and health threat.
  • In news that will surely set off a whole lot of red flags and pique the interest of many, Green Mile actor Doug Hutchison tied the knot with singer Courtney Stodden this week. Not sure why that’s newsworthy or so interesting? Well, Hutchison is 51 years old, and Stodden is … wait for it … 16.
  • The crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is still leaking and, judging from the experience at Chernobyl, Japan’s recovery won’t be measured in years, but centuries.
  • As record floodwaters along the Missouri River drench homes and businesses, concerns have grown about keeping a couple of notable structures dry: two riverside nuclear power plants in Nebraska.
  • As the mainstream media continues to be obsessed with Anthony Weiner and his bizarre adventures on Twitter, much more serious events are happening around the world that are getting very little attention. In America today, if the mainstream media does not cover something it is almost as if it never happened. Right now, the worst nuclear disaster in human history continues to unfold in Japan , U.S. nuclear facilities are being threatened by flood waters, the U.S. military is bombing Yemen, gigantic cracks in the earth are appearing all over the globe and the largest wildfire in Arizona history is causing immense devastation. But Anthony Weiner, Bristol Palin and Miss USA are what the mainstream media want to tell us about and most Americans are buying it.
  • Check out the smooth dance moves this gorilla pulls off! Think you could do better than that?
  • Yes, we’re a “nation of immigrants,” but I don’t recall anyone swimming around Ellis Island to get here.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under Fetish, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Do You Kiss Yer Mother With That Mouth?

    • A study finds a surprising number of dudes pretend to orgasm during sex.
    • Fixed Gear’s ‘n Chicks
    • Whoa, stand back! All 6 feet and 8 inches of Ricki. If you have ever said you are a “leg man” this is your dream come true (in true amazon form.) Jeepers!
    • Genital self-amputation in men is a rare condition. We report an interesting case of penile self-amputation that was performed and surgically repaired by a nonpsychotic patient who was enrolled in a clinical trial for androgen replacement therapy. Using sterile technique for amputation of the glans penis and using cotton thread to suture the wound, the patient was able to avoid hemorrhage and infection. This is the first reported case of androgen therapy–induced penile self-amputation with patient-performed surgical reconstruction using primitive instruments.
    • Who says Congress never gets anything done? On Thursday, the Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously approved a bill that would give the Attorney General the right to shut down websites with a court order if copyright infringement is deemed “central to the activity” of the site — regardless if the website has actually committed a crime. The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA) is among the most draconian laws ever considered to combat digital piracy, and contains what some have called the “nuclear option,” which would essentially allow the Attorney General to turn suspected websites “off.”
    • Energy Jerky?! W00f!
    • These stills from the film, along with the narration, may help give some idea of the character of this hate-propaganda film. The text of the narrator’s comments is given for each shot from which each image is taken, in English and German.
    • The Hollow Earth hypothesis says that the planet Earth is either wholly hollow or otherwise contains a substantial interior space.
    • “More than 10 women with kitchen knives attacked him and four women had sexual intercourse with him.”
    • An undiscovered Marilyn Monroe regularly hung around the hotel’s ­corridors in the Fifties and director Nicholas Ray bedded an underage Natalie Wood in one of the bungalows, while casting her for Rebel Without A Cause opposite James Dean. Another member of the film’s cast was the outrageous Easy Rider star Dennis Hopper. Orgies attended by up to 50 girls were greedily recorded on camera by him. In order to fuel his warped appetites, Hopper would inject himself with a mixture of cocaine and ­heroin every ten minutes. This was the same combination that killed John Belushi in Bungalow number three.
    • “It’s on my scalp, it’s on my scalp,” the boy can be heard yelling, as he helplessly runs around the room while his friends laugh. The boy begins whimpering and starts hitting his own head as the flames race up his arms. Another friend joins in to try and put the fire out. It eventually goes out after the boy — who has not been identified — shoves his head into the toilet.
    • Can you be convicted of a crime when the victim never existed? This week, the Washington State Supreme Court said yes you can.
    • The evacuation of a Chester County hotel earlier this month was caused when staffers entered a room, found an Indiana man’s naked, lifeless body next to various sexual devices and a gas mask, and smelled the stinging odor of unknown liquids, police and sources said. The liquids turned out to be cleaning solutions that the man had been huffing as part of a solo sexual act, a source said yesterday.
    • At home, Abid Saddique and Mohammed Liaqat, both of whom were married with young children, were considered clean, upstanding family men as well as devout Muslims. But once they left their front door and their wives behind, they turned into vodka-swilling, cocaine-binging paedophiles who spent every available moment randomly targeting young girls on the street, befriending them, and then horrifically abusing them.
    • After billions of years the Sun finally has an owner — a woman from Spain’s soggy region of Galicia said Friday she had registered the star at a local notary public as being her property.
    • National Library has always been reputed to haunted. Now, here is a really eerie secret. A mysterious room has been discovered in the 250-year-old building a room that no one knew about and no one can enter because it seems to have no opening of kind, not even trapdoors. The chamber has lain untouched for over two centuries. Wonder what secrets it holds. The archaeologists who discovered it have no clue either, their theories range from a torture chamber, or a sealed tomb for an unfortunate soul or the most favoured of all a treasure room. Some say they wouldn’t be surprised if both skeletons and jewels tumble out of the secret room.
    • As of its last update, Torrentfreak counted 76 domains shut down this week. Homeland Security’s ability to shut down sites without a court order evidently comes from the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, a Clinton-era law that allows Web sites to be closed on the basis of a copyright complaint. Critics have long assailed the DMCA for being too broad, as complainants don’t need to prove copyright infringement before a site can be taken down.

    Submit Links:
    SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

    File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

    Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on November 28, 2010

    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,