Concert | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Link Wray Live 1974

Link Wray

Link Wray – Full Concert
Recorded Live: 11/19/1974 – Winterland (San Francisco, CA)

 

Setlist:
0:00:00 – Rumble
0:03:11 – Rawhide
0:05:04 – Good Time Joe
0:09:48 – Walkin’ Bulldog
0:13:23 – Backwoods Preacher Man
0:16:24 – Music Man
0:22:00 – In Love With You
0:26:24 – Midnight Lover
0:35:11 – I Got To Ramble
0:41:57 – Mystery Train
0:46:54 – Be What You Want To
0:52:49 – My First Plea (Incomplete)

 

Link Wray

File under Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on August 7, 2014

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Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on August 7, 2014

Tags: , , ,

Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on August 7, 2014

Tags: , , ,

Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on August 7, 2014

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Mayor of the Sunset Strip (2003) Rodney Bingenheimer Hollywood Rock Scenester

Rodney Bingenheimer Riot House

The Rodney Bingenheimer of today seems always to be smiling through a deep sadness. He is a small man who still has the youthful cuteness that must have won him friends in his early days. His hair is still combed in the same tousled mid-1970s rock star style, and his T-shirts are the real thing, not retro. He lives now in an inexpensive apartment jammed with records, tapes, discs, and countless autographed photos of his friends the stars. And, yes, they are still his friends; they have not forgotten him, and David Bowie, Cher, Debbie Harry, Courtney Love, Nancy Sinatra and Mick Jagger all appear in this film and seem genuinely fond of Rodney.

Rodney Bingenheimer Riot House

Well they might. He introduced some of them — Bowie in particular — to American radio. He was known for finding new music and playing it first: The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, the Clash, Nirvana. Stations all over the country stole their playlists from Rodney. “Sonny and Cher were kinda like my mom and my dad,” he says wistfully at one point. He ran a little club for a while, featuring British glam rock, and the stars remember with a grin that it was so small the “VIP Area” consisted simply of a velvet rope separating a few chairs from the dance floor.

Rodney Bingenheimer English Disco

The story of how Bingenheimer entered into this world is apparently true, unlikely as it sounds. As a kid he was obsessed with stars, devoured the fan magazines, collected autographs. One day when he was a teenager, his mother dropped him off in front of Connie Stevens’ house and told him he was on his own. He didn’t see his mother for another five or six years. Connie wasn’t home.

Rodney Bingenheimer n Jimi Hendrix

He migrated to the Sunset Strip, but instead of dying there or disappearing into drugs or crime, he simply ingratiated himself. People liked him. He hustled himself into a job as a gofer for Davy Jones of the Monkees (they looked a little alike), and then became a backstage caterer; a survivor of a Doors tour remembers a Toronto concert where Rodney had enormous platters of fresh shrimp backstage. But the Beatles were backstage visitors, and Rodney gave them the shrimp, so there were only a few left for the Doors, who had paid for them. Challenged by The Doors, Rodney shrugged and said, “Well, they’re the Beatles.”

Rodney Bingenheimer English Disco

Wherever Bingenheimer went in the music and club scene, his face was his passport. Robert Plant says, “Rodney got more girls than I do.” We hear a little of his radio show from the old days, and what comes across is not a vibrating personality or a great radio voice — it’s kind of tentative, really — but an almost painful sincerity. He loves the music he plays, and he introduces it to you like a lover he thinks is right for you. The road downhill was gradual, apparently. We get glimpses of Rodney today, repairing his mom’s old Nova with a pair of pliers, shuffling forlornly through souvenirs of his glory days. He seems very even, calm, sad but resigned, except for one moment the documentary camera is not supposed to witness, when he finds that another deejay, a person he sponsored and gave breaks to, is starting a show of new music — stealing Rodney’s gig. He explodes in anger. We’re glad he does. He has a lot to feel angry about.

Rodney Bingenheimer-and-joan-jett

The film was directed by George Hickenlooper, who made the classic doc “Hearts Of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse” (1991), about the nightmare of Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now,” and the wonderful fiction film “The Man From Elysian Fields” (2001). Why did he make this film (apart from the possibility that someone named Hickenlooper might feel an affinity for someone named Bingenheimer)? Hickenlooper has been around fame at an early age. He was 26 when he released the doc about the Coppola meltdown. He cast Mick Jagger and James Coburn in “Elysian Fields.” He was aware of Rodney Bingenheimer when the name still opened doors. His film evokes what the Japanese call mono no aware, which refers to the impermanence of life and the bittersweet transience of things. There is a little Rodney Bingenheimer in everyone, but you know what? Most people aren’t as lucky as Rodney. – Roger Ebert

rodney mayor

File under Blast From The Past, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex

Powder Ridge Rock Festival (1970) 30,000 Drugged Out Hippies, No Bands

Powder Ridge Hippie Shitshow

The Powder Ridge Rock Festival was scheduled to be held July 31, August 1 and August 2, 1970 at Powder Ridge Ski Area in Middlefield, Connecticut. A legal injunction forced the event to be canceled, keeping the musicians away; but a crowd of 30,000 attendees arrived anyway, to find no food, no entertainment, no adequate plumbing, and at least seventy drug dealers. William Manchester wrote: “Powder Ridge was an accident waiting to happen, and it happened.” Volunteer doctor William Abruzzi declared a drug “crisis” on 1 August and said “Woodstock was a pale pot scene. This is a heavy hallucinogens scene.”

Blonde-with-rings

Tickets were sold by mail at a price of $20 for the whole weekend. The announced line-up of musicians included:

Day 1: Eric Burdon & War, Sly and the Family Stone, Delaney & Bonnie, Fleetwood Mac, Melanie, Mountain, J.F. Murphy and Free Flowing Salt, Allan Nichols, James Taylor

Day 2: Joe Cocker, Allman Brothers, Cactus, Little Richard, Van Morrison, Rhinoceros, Ten Wheel Drive, Jethro Tull, Tony Williams Lifetime, Zephyr

Day 3: Janis Joplin, Chuck Berry, Bloodrock, Savoy Brown, Chicken Shack, Grand Funk Railroad, Richie Havens, John B. Sebastian, Spirit, Ten Years After

Robert Santelli stated in Aquarius Rising that an appearance by Led Zeppelin was also planned.

 

Powder Ridge might have been a legendary hippie music fest had things gone right. In the year following Woodstock, however, things often went wrong for hippie music fests, which went into “a long spiral of decline”. Thirty of the forty-eight major festivals planned for 1970 were cancelled, usually due to swiftly materializing local opposition. Powder Ridge, however, made national news because of the arrival of tens of thousands of ticketholders despite the event’s cancellation. The New York Times followed its progress in about thirty articles before, during, and after the event.

Middlefield residents, worried about the impact of the crowd on their small town, received an injunction against the festival just days before it began.

When the owner of the ski resort tried to contact the promoters to tell of the injunction, they could not be found. It looked like the event was never going to happen anyway.

Attendees arrive anyway

Local authorities posted warning signs on every highway leading to Middlefield: “Festival Prohibited, turn back”.

Police Warn Hippies

By 1970, rock festivals were regarded as having a political dimension. Carol Brightman wrote that “Rock shows… such as the Powder Ridge concert… were increasingly being covered by the national media as civil events, one step removed from street demonstrations.” The CIA had Powder Ridge, like other rock events, under surveillance, and noted in a July 30 situation report that “hippie-type young people [were] already beginning to assemble in the area.”

Promoters, however, kept hinting that there was still a chance that the concert would be held: “It’s a total wait and see thing,” a spokesman said and, after all, Woodstock had almost been cancelled too.

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Approximately 30,000 people came to the site for the weekend. Most of the musicians, however, did not show up. Only Melanie and a few local bands actually performed during the three-day weekend. One of these local bands was “The Mustard Family” who, in the dark of night, hauled their instruments and equipment into the festival, by back roads and trails, and performed for the enthusiastic crowd. The official poster for the festival lists New York band, Haystacks Balboa, as the special opening act on Thursday night. The band’s equipment was stopped by the authorities and the musicians gathered at a local cafe to await word as to their performance. After long negotiations, the band’s manager advised the band to return home, there was to be no performance.

Powder Ridge 1970 Acid 1 Dollar

Drugs were openly sold and commonly consumed at the festival. Rock doctor William Abruzzi (also at Woodstock) was there to treat bad LSD trips, and said there were more bad trips at Powder Ridge per capita than at any other music festival he’d ever worked. He attributed some of the problems to the barrels of “electric water” that were available for free public consumption; people were invited to drop donations of drugs into these barrels, creating drug cocktails of unknown strength and composition.

Powder ridge 1970 Body Painting

William Manchester writes:

One of the more sensational scenes, attested to by several witnesses, occurred in a small wood near some homes. A boy and a girl, both naked and approaching from different directions, met under the trees. On impulse they suddenly embraced. She dropped to her knees, he mounted her from behind, and after he had achieved his climax they parted—apparently without exchanging a word.

Naked Hippies Cops Watching

According to The New York Times, observers who had been at both Woodstock and Powder Ridge were struck by the contrasting moods of the two festivals:

The gentle euphoria—the grins, small smiles, and exchanged “V” signals— of people milling through the muddy fields of Bethel seemed to be missing at Powder Ridge. Instead, last night and this morning, the major pastime here was often shuffling walks along paved roads by grim-faced young men and women who looked remarkably similar to old people moving slowly along the boardwalks of the Rockaways or Atlantic City.

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In his autobiography, Nothing’s Sacred, comedian Lewis Black claims to have attended the festival with some friends. Black explains in depth his activities of the weekend, including drug experimentation, failing at his appointed parking attendant job, and the downturn the concert took after a fiery speech from a Black Panther of the militant New Haven, Connecticut contingent, which happened to coincide with a thunderstorm. Black theorizes that under the effects of hallucinogens, many attendees probably thought that the Black Panther was actually causing the storm, and many began to experience bad trips.

File under Blast From The Past, Massive Consumption of Drugs, Music, Photography, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Guns N’ Roses Rocket Queen Riot (1991) Axl Rose Starts a Riot in St Louis

axl-rose-mugshot-6706

The Riverport Riot was a riot at the Riverport Amphitheater (now named Verizon Wireless Amphitheater St. Louis) in Maryland Heights, Missouri (near St. Louis) at a Guns N’ Roses concert on July 2, 1991. It is also known as the “Rocket Queen Riot.”

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During the band’s performance of “Rocket Queen“, the 15th song in the set (counting drum & guitar solos), lead singer Axl Rose, in the middle of the chorus, pointed out a fan who was taking still pictures of the show, saying “…Hey, take that! Take that! Now, get that guy and take that!” When security failed to deal with the person, Rose decided to confiscate the camera himself, saying “I’ll take it, god damn it!” and then jumped into the audience and tackled the person. After taking the camera, striking members of the audience and the security team, and being pulled out of the audience by members of the crew, Rose grabs his microphone and said “Well, thanks to the lame-ass security, I’m going home!”, slammed his microphone on the ground and left the stage.

Screen-Shot-2012-07-02-at-4.21.44-PM1-600x430

The sound the microphone made sounded to some fans like a gunshot. After Rose left, band member Slash quickly told the audience, “He just smashed the microphone. We’re out of here.” The angry crowd began to riot and dozens of people were injured. The footage was captured by Robert John, who was documenting the entire tour for the band. Rose was charged with having incited the riot, but police were unable to arrest him until almost a year later, as the band went overseas to continue the tour. Charges were filed against Rose but a judge ruled that he did not directly incite the riot.

axl-ditangkap

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Rose later stated that the Guns N’ Roses security team had made four separate requests to the venue’s security staff to remove the camera, all of which were ignored, that other members of the band had reported being hit by bottles from the audience and that the venue’s security had not been very strict, allowing weapons into the arena and refusing to enforce a drinking limit. Consequently, Use Your Illusion I and IIs artwork featured a hidden message amidst the Thank You section of the album insert: “Fuck You, St. Louis!”

axel_st_louis_medium_medium

Full Show

File under Blast From The Past, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB