F-Bomb | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

The Grand Wizard Of Links

  • Hundreds of Big Bear High School yearbooks have been recalled because of a picture showing a 17-year-old boy with his hand up his date’s dress, officials said Thursday.

    The photo may involve sexual penetration and constitutes child pornography, said Cindy Bachman, spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

  • A woman traveling on New York’s Metro North train line was recorded by a fellow passenger telling train employees that she is too “well-educated” to be told to quiet down and not use profanity in her cell-phone conversation.

    “Do you know what schools I’ve been to? How well-educated I am?” she asks the train employee, who is seen explaining to another employee that she asked the passenger to stop using the “F-bomb.”

    “I’m sorry do you think I’m a little hoodlum?” she asks, then demands her money back and dares the conductor to stop the train.

  • Black hole fires beams at Earth while destroying star: a massive black hole has been discovered devouring a star, causing the star to shoot beams of energy at Earth. The event is thought to occur only once every 100 million years.
  • Virtually every article about the flooding mentions that the Fort Calhoun plant was shut down on April 9. On May 27, the Omaha World-Herald reported, “The Omaha Public Power District said its nuclear plant at Fort Calhoun, which is shut down for maintenance, is safe from flooding.” The implication is that being shut down makes a plant safe. But as the ongoing crisis in Fukushima demonstrates, nuclear fuel remains hot long after a reactor is shut down. When Fort Calhoun is shut down for maintenance and refueling, only one-third of the fuel in the reactor core is removed. Besides the hot fuel remaining in the core, there is even more fuel stored in the spent-fuel pool, which is not shut down. According to a May 2011 report by Robert Alvarez at the Institute for Policy Studies, there are an estimated 1,054 assemblies of spent fuel, weighing 379 tons, at Fort Calhoun.
  • Three hundred miles southwest of Fukushima, at a nuclear reactor perched on the slopes of this rustic peninsula, engineers are engaged in another precarious struggle.
    The Monju prototype fast-breeder reactor — a long-troubled national project — has been in a precarious state of shutdown since a 3.3-ton device crashed into the reactor’s inner vessel, cutting off access to the plutonium and uranium fuel rods at its core. Engineers have tried repeatedly since the accident last August to recover the device, which appears to have gotten stuck. They will make another attempt as early as next week.

  • US scientists claim to have discovered a dangerous new plant disease linked to genetically modified crops and the pesticides used on them.

    The research, which is yet to be completed, suggests the pathogen could be the cause of recent widespread crop failure and miscarriages in livestock.

    Emeritus Professor Don Huber from Perdue University says his research shows that animals fed on GM corn or soybeans may suffer serious health problems due to the pathogen.

    “They’re finding anywhere from 20 per cent to as much as 55 per cent of those [animals] will miscarriage or spontaneously abort,” he said.

  • I’m 35. I come from an era in which pre-teens had to go on cultural-archeological digs not just for porn, but also for punk music, so-called art house movies, strange literature, and underground comics. We shoplifted, sent away for zines and catalogs, and traded with each other to get our hands on contraband materials. But something we probably have in common with the youth of today, and all kids ever, is that when we were even younger, images seem to have sought us out—not the other way around. That brings me, finally, to the subject of this post, which is a few of the images that, at some point early in my life, lodged themselves into the nascent “this is what turns you on” portion of my brain. These things are running around in there even now, perhaps a little more spectral with each year, but working their influence nonetheless.
  • The fire spread quickly. Flaming rum splashed across plates and onto skin, igniting Katie Hudgins’ dress, sending horrified shrieks through the dining room of Ozona Blue restaurant.

    The table of five had just minutes earlier ordered dessert: two helpings of Bananas Foster, a sweet, spectacular flambe dish sauteed in butter and ignited with rum.

    But as server Ian Monsalvo poured the 151-proof liquor into the pan, a sudden burst of flames erupted. Caught in the blaze was Hudgins, 25, an elementary school teacher, whose fiance’s parents had invited her to dinner.

    Nick Salzer, 20, an Ozona Blue chef and aspiring firefighter, raced from the kitchen, tore off Hudgins’ burning dress and stomped out the flames. With others, he guided Hudgins to a couch in the lobby and covered her with a blanket as an unidentified woman frantically called 911.

  • General sluttiness is surely among the attributes preening liberals refer to when they bray about “San Francisco Values.” From the Mission to the Marina, from the “soiled doves” who ruled the Barbary Coast to the present-day skank chain-smoking in front of Vertigo, we are a city of the lecherous, the depraved, and the polyamorous.

    This open secret is confirmed in a new study commissioned by condom-maker Trojan, which found that among residents of the major U.S. cities surveyed, San Franciscans reported having had sex with the greatest number of people. We clocked in at an average of 30 partners. (Not all at once, mind you — even San Franciscans face certain physical limitations.) At the bottom of the list were Chicagoans, who reported, on average, having had 11 partners.

  • An escaped convict was caught following a day on the loose after he knocked on the door of a cabin in the woods – only to find out the man renting the lodge was an off-duty guard at the prison he just fled.
  • Researchers looking for signs of life elsewhere in the universe often start by looking for one key ingredient necessary to complex life as we know it: water. And just 750 light-years away, they’ve found quite a bit of it spewing from the poles of a young, sunlike star that is blasting jets of H2O into interstellar space at 124,000 miles per hour.
  • Whereas descriptions of online addiction are controversial at best among researchers, a new study cuts through much of the debate and hints that excessive time online can physically rewire a brain.

    The work, published June 3 in PLoS ONE, suggests self-assessed Internet addiction, primarily through online multiplayer games, rewires structures deep in the brain. What’s more, surface-level brain matter appears to shrink in step with the duration of online addiction.

    “I’d be surprised if playing online games for 10 to 12 hours a day didn’t change the brain,” says neuroscientist Nora Volkow of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, who wasn’t involved in the study. “The reason why Internet addiction isn’t a widely recognized disorder is a lack of scientific evidence. Studies like this are exactly what is needed to recognize and settle on its diagnostic criteria,” she says.

  • A British student is facing extradition to the United States and up to five years in jail for running a website that offered links to pirated films and television shows.
  • A research team from Open Minds captured photos of a strange, seemingly biologic UFO in the sky above Mexico City. For more details, you can read the full story in the August/September 2010 issue of Open Minds magazine.
  • A Montana resident says an energy company has identified the cause of a brief power outage as “deer with wings.” Lee Bridges says she was outside with her dogs around the time the power went out when a NorthWestern Energy truck pulled up, giving her a chance to ask the driver what caused the problem.

    She says he pointed up and said, “Apparently, we’ve got deer with wings.”

  • “Once you go outside the hoard and you start covering that unions and workers are fighting against cut-backs from a powerful mayor and they want Wall Street to pay higher taxes, well, those are likely your sponsors if you are a big commercial news operation,” explained journalism Professor Jeff Cohen.

    As the media treads carefully around the issues, the people’s anger is growing – so how many will be camping out here before the media is shaken out of its self-imposed oblivion to report what matters?

  • The TSA, in alliance with a whole host of federal, state, local agencies as well as military personnel, is currently conducting a massive “security exercise” throughout Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia.

    “The participating teams are composed of a variety of TSA assets including federal air marshals, canine teams, inspectors and bomb appraisal officers. They will be joined by state and local law enforcement officials to supplement existing resources, provide detection and response capabilities. The exercise will utilize multiple airborne assets, including Blackhawk helicopters and fixed wing aircraft as well as waterborne and surface teams,” reports the Marietta Times.

    Although the exercise is couched in serious rhetoric about preparedness, it relates to “no specific threat” and the details are nebulous to say the least and seems to revolve around little else than testing out high-tech surveillance equipment and reminding Americans who their bosses are.

  • Located about 20 minutes outside downtown Omaha, the largest city in Nebraska, the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Plant is owned by Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) who on their website denies their plant is at a “Level 4” emergency by stating: “This terminology is not accurate, and is not how emergencies at nuclear power plants are classified.”

    Russian atomic scientists in this FAAE report, however, say that this OPPD statement is an “outright falsehood” as all nuclear plants in the world operate under the guidelines of the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) which clearly states the “events” occurring at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant do, indeed, put it in the “Level 4” emergency category of an “accident with local consequences” thus making this one of the worst nuclear accidents in US history.

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File under Comics, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on June 18, 2011

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Fuck A LOLCat, Gimme RIOT DOG!

  • “This research shows that the brain activation is able to predict what music is going to become popular two or three years from now,” said Stanford University marketing professor Baba Shiv, who studies decision-making but wasn’t involved in the project. “We have to wake up to the notion that these instinctual brain functions can have predictive value.”
  • A Battle Creek woman is asking authorities to file assault charges against her husband’s ex-wife for sending him a letter smeared with peanut butter.

    According to police, the woman said she is highly allergic to peanuts and that she believed putting peanut butter on a bill sent to her husband was an attempt to harm her.

  • Robert Sayegh was on a Delta Airlines carrier flight home from his cousin’s wedding in Kansas City when he said a flight attendant overheard him complaining about a 45-minute delay to a fellow passenger.

    “It’s ridiculous and embarrassing,” the television producer and children’s book author said this morning from his home in Brooklyn. “I was just kind of talking to the guy sitting next to me. I said ‘What is taking so long?’ I said “What the ‘F’ is going on?’ ” Sayegh said. “I could see if I directed it at (the flight attendant), but I didn’t even speak to him.”

  • “IT’S LIKE AN INSECT INFESTATION”

    In recent months hackers have broken into the SecurID tokens used by millions of people, targeting data from defense contractors Lockheed Martin, L3 and almost certainly others; launched a sophisticated strike on the International Monetary Fund; and breached digital barriers to grab account information from Sony, Google, Citigroup and a long list of others.

    The latest high-profile victims were the public websites of the CIA and the U.S. Senate – whose committees are drafting legislation to improve coordination of cyber defenses.

    Terabytes of data are flying out the door, and billions of dollars are lost in remediation costs and reputational harm, government and private security experts said in interviews. The head of the U.S. military’s Cyber Command, General Keith Alexander, has estimated that Pentagon computer systems are probed by would-be assailants 250,000 times each hour.

  • Bangkok, Thailand. Just fourteen years ago, the Sathorn Unique skyscraper was being built, destined to become one of the city’s fanciest residential addresses. Now, it is an abandoned building. Never completed, it remains as yet another “ghost tower” of Bangkok. A tangle of trees and vines are beginning to take over the lighter parts of this monolith, such as the four storey archways and romanesque feature columns. Amazingly, this building is located in the central area of one of the worlds largest cities.
  • A researcher says the death rate among babies is up 48 percent since Iodine-131 was found in Philadelphia’s drinking water

    Joseph Mangano is is the executive director of the Radiation And Public Health Project in New York, which is made of up scientists and health professionals.

    there has been a recent spike, in infant deaths in Philadelphia, and Mangano says radioactive levels, in our water could be to blame.

    After the explosion at the Fukushima power plant in Japan, radiation circled the globe, all the way to Pennsylvania.

    About a month, after the disaster, radiation levels spiked, in our water, at three Philadelphia facilities.

    Mangano said radiation combined with higher levels of iodine the EPAQ found in Philadelphia’s water two months ago may be killing young babies here.

    We’re reporting his research not to alarm or cause panic, but to inform. It’s enough time to suggest, not conclude yet. The real benefit is it is a red flag for more studies to be done.

  • For the administrator of the Portland Water Bureau, the decision Wednesday to drain 7.8 million gallons of drinking water from a Mount Tabor reservoir comes down to six words:

    “Do you want to drink pee?” David Shaff asked.

    About 1:30 a.m. Wednesday, water officials say, a 21-year-old Molalla man was caught on camera urinating in one of Portland’s uncovered reservoirs — one that provides water to a majority of Portlanders.

    From a gross-out perspective, that’s enough to make residents wary of turning on the tap.

  • According to a report this week, Facebook lost nearly 6 million users in the U.S. in May. Facebook disputes the number, and yet it’s not implausible.

    What Facebook user hasn’t thought of walking out?

    Part of the problem with Facebook is how good it is at the thing it was invented to do, which is to put you in contact with people.

    Contact with people turns out to be a mixed blessing. The more people you’re in contact with, the more people there are for you to disappoint, offend, annoy — and the other way around. Though Facebook entertains, diverts and sometimes educates, it also multiplies all the problems that come with relationships.

    But that’s an old lament about Facebook. So is the sad truth that Facebook drains time that would be more productively used, say, practicing the mandolin.

    The newer problem is that Facebook has come to feel like a stalker. Not only does it do kinky things with your personal data, its little blue F box is more intrusive and insistent every day.

  • The study found that today’s average new cable high-definition digital video recorders (HD-DVR) use more than half the energy of an average new refrigerator and more than an average new flat panel TV. Two-thirds of their total energy consumption – the equivalent annual energy output of six coal-burning power plants – occurs when they’re not in use.
  • In the Smithsonian Institution is a sixteenth-century automaton of a monk, made of wood and iron, 15 inches in height. Driven by a key-wound spring, the monk walks in a square, striking his chest with his right arm, raising and lowering a small wooden cross and rosary in his left hand, turning and nodding his head, rolling his eyes, and mouthing silent obsequies. From time to time, he brings the cross to his lips and kisses it. After over 400 years, he remains in good working order.
  • In the early years of the Iraq war, the U.S. military developed a technology so secret that soldiers would refuse to acknowledge its existence, and reporters mentioning the gear were promptly escorted out of the country. That equipment – a radio-frequency jammer – was upgraded several times, and eventually robbed the Iraq insurgency of its most potent weapon, the remote-controlled bomb. But the dark veil surrounding the jammers remained largely intact, even after the Pentagon bought more than 50,000 units at a cost of over $17 billion.
  • Robert Adams at first thought someone was playing a trick when he saw the plastic bag filled with money lying next to a news box in a suburban strip mall.

    Adams told WGN-AM’s Greg Jarrett this morning that the bag sitting outside the Chase Bank branch in Rolling Meadow where he was headed late Monday afternoon to get some cash to buy a lunchtime burrito was filled with lots of bills–a little more than $17,000, as police later determined.

  • Human scum! At the entrance to Kengkou market, a person is roasting a live puppy!
  • Despite the corporate-driven hubbub surrounding the inevitability of “the cloud” replacing personal hard drives as the pre-eminent storage center for all web content, this system represents another dangerous trojan horse for the establishment to complete their agenda to regulate and shut down the free Internet.

    Apple, Google and Amazon amongst other tech giants have all jumped on board with “the cloud,” a remote server network that allows users to store their data without using hard drives.

    “It’s all part of a generational trend away from owning physical media content and towards renting media content from the computing universal cloud,” reports Investmentu.com.

    However, despite the convenience of having all your files easily accessible in one place wherever you go, the drawbacks are ominous.

  • Last July, the defendant asked the victim to wait for him early in morning at a Netanya intersection. He picked her up in his car and drove her to the beach. There he told her that she is fated “to become the messiah’s mother,” and that she must “atone for all the bad deeds that she has done so far” by having sexual relations with him.

    He then conducted a marriage ceremony with the girl while still in the car, and swore her to secrecy. At one point he asked her to take her clothes off, and assaulted her.

  • Three young women escaped a sinking SUV after a direction from a rental car GPS unit sent them down a boat launch and into the Mercer Slough early Wednesday.

    The driver apparently thought she was on a road while following her GPS unit just after midnight, but she was actually heading down the Sweyolocken boat launch.

  • It might be the ‘Land of the Free’, but some states certainly aren’t living up to the words of America’s national anthem.

    New York, New Jersey and California are the least free in the U.S., based on an index of public policies affecting your individual freedoms.

    The rankings are based economic, social and personal freedoms of Americans – and include measures such as taxes, government spending and regulations.

  • Heat, drugs and alcohol can be a deadly combination at large summer music festivals like the Bonnaroo Festival Music & Arts that just wrapped in Manchester, Tenn., where a second death was reported Tuesday. Entertainment Weekly reports that a 24-year-old man died from hyperthermia, a condition that occurs when the body gets too hot and can’t cool itself. Temperatures at the festival were in the 90s, and large crowds of sweaty bodies probably didn’t help the situation.

    A few days ago a 32-year-old woman was found dead at the festival’s camp grounds, but the cause of death is not known. In 2004 two men also died at Bonnaroo, which was then three years old, and were the first deaths to occur at that festival.

    Bonnaroo isn’t the only outsize concert to have suffered casualties: In 2008, a 21-year-old man died of a drug overdose at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, and in 2010 at least 19 people were killed in a stampede at the Love Parade festival in Germany.

  • A man “marries” a mannequin and wheels her on a walking tour of upstate New York.
  • The elderly are killed. Young women are raped. And able-bodied men are given hammers, machetes and sticks and forced to fight to the death.

    In one of the most chilling revelations yet about the violence in Mexico, a drug cartel-connected trafficker claims fellow gangsters have kidnapped highway bus passengers and forced them into gladiatorlike fights to groom fresh assassins.

  • Basement full of evil radioactive yellow water
  • A 12-year-old boy died after eating cookies poisoned by two girls at his school in northeastern Brazil, police told AFP Tuesday.

    The girls, aged 13 and 14, admitted putting a deadly dose of rat poison in the cookies, but claimed they were meant for two rival girls at their school on the outskirts of the city of Recife, the investigating officer, Mariana Villas Boas, said.

    The boy, who was called to deliver the toxic cookies for them to allay suspicions, was not aware of the plan and ate them instead, with deadly result. He was taken to hospital in agony and died shortly afterwards.

    “The boy died last Thursday after eating the poisoned biscuits,” Villas Boas said.

  • Japanese scientist making artificial meat from human feces.

    Sh*t Steaks And Turd Burgers – Now that’s what you call the ORGANIC part of a Green movement -ha

    He says the biggest hurdle is the psychological barrier.
    you have to be shitting me!

  • Two men have been arrested in connection with a murder plot involving British singer Joss Stone. They were taken into custody in Devon, England, near Stone’s home, police have confirmed to BBC News.

    The two unidentified men, ages 30 and 33, were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to murder and rob the star. They were apprehended on Monday after a suspicious vehicle was seen in the Cullompton area and were initially arrested on “possession of offensive weapons and being equipped to steal.”

    Once arrested, they were reportedly found in possession of swords, forensic-style overalls, plans of Stone’s house and a body bag. Police added that the singer is aware of the arrests, although it is not known if she was home at the time they were made.

  • Are you prepared to be yet again disappointed in and freaked out by the incompetence of TSA agents? Chicagoan Paul Kahan, a James Beard award winning chef and partner at the awesome restaurants Avec, Blackbird, Big Star and The Publican, managed to slip four of his massive chef knives through security at Chicago-O’Hare Airport. What happened then? Well, he took his flight like normal with four giant knives at easy reach.
  • “Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind,” Arnold Gundersen, a former nuclear industry senior vice president, told Al Jazeera.
  • Rich Lam shot an amazing photo of a couple making out in the middle of one of the riots last night in Vancover after the Canucks lost in game seven of the Stanley Cup Finals.
  • This spirited dog has been participating in Greek riots since 2008. Everything you see is real and unaltered.
  • So it was doubly delicious to see Shepard Fairey flunk his first ordeal with the paparazzi, this bane of celebrity. After a decade of having his corporate brand enter our public space in the guise of a rebellious act, TMZ flaunted the liberty of public space exactly like Shepard Fairey has with glued up OBEY signage. The tables were turned and now instead of us, the public, forced to endure Fairey’s flaunting of the social contract with unwanted street art, it was the street art legend forced to endure scrutiny in a public space for our entertainment.
  • IPHONE users may soon be stopped from filming at concerts — as a result of new Apple technology.

    The leading computer company plans to build a system that will sense when people are trying to video live events — and turn off their cameras.

    A patent application filed by Apple revealed how the technology would work.

    If an iPhone were held up and used to film during a concert infra-red sensors would detect it.

    These sensors would then contact the iPhone and automatically disable its camera function.

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File under Music, Secret History, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on June 17, 2011

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Cookin’ Up Moon Mist Flavored Meth In A 3 Liter Faygo Bottle

  • Thanks Kristie Muller
  • Where my nigga Higgs Boson at?!
  • San Francisco prosecutors may be forced to drop a total of 1,400 cases in the growing scandal at the police drug lab, including hundreds in which defendants have been placed in drug treatment programs.
  • “We need to consider what drug prohibition has done to the vital profession of law enforcement. It has divided police officers from the communities we serve, alienated us from young people, sent our call-loads through the roof, placed huge financial strains on police budgets and, sometimes, my colleagues have been injured or murdered while enforcing these drug laws. Every police officer should question whether the War on Drugs is worth fighting, particularly when there are other policy options that would result in less crime, addiction, disease and death.”
  • “Tens of thousands” of pieces of child pornography in the mediums of photographs, DVDs, books, cameras, and camcorders were found in Biby’s home, Goodrich said. Disturbingly, he said, numerous camcorders were found to be filled with what appeared to be homemade video tapes of children.

    Officers say Biby’s car was discovered to be filled “from floor to ceiling” with child pornography as well.

    The children in the photos and videos appear to primarily range in age from infant to pre-pubescent, Goodrich said.

    Police also uncovered binoculars with cameras built into them in Biby’s house and car, as well as hundreds of game tokens for use at the children’s restaurant, “Chuck-E-Cheese.”

  • FUCK THE SCUMBAG POPE!
  • McCollum’s spokeswoman Maria Reppas said Thursday that the congresswoman’s district office in St. Paul received the condom in an envelope dated March 23, along with an anonymous typed letter reading: “Betty McCollum you’ve been dry fucked by the liberal party.”
  • After giving a short warm-up speech in advance of President Obama’s speech, Biden turned to embrace the President and said “this is a big fucking deal!” (At about the 20 second mark.)
  • UbuWeb is pleased to present dozens of avant-garde films & videos for your viewing pleasure. However, it is important to us that you realize that what you will see is in no way comparable to the experience of seeing these gems as they were intended to be seen: in a dark room, on a large screen, with a good sound system and, most importantly, with a roomful of warm, like-minded bodies.
  • Scareware, also known as rogueware or fake antivirus software, has become one of the fastest-growing, and most prevalent, types of internet fraud. Software maker Panda Security estimates that each month some 35 million PCs worldwide, or 3.5 percent of all computers, are infected with these malicious programs, putting more than $400 million a year in the hands of cybercriminals. “When you include cost incurred by consumers replacing computers or repairing, the total damages figure is much, much larger than the out of pocket figure,” said Ethan Arenson, an attorney with the Federal Trade Commission who helps direct the agency’s efforts to fight cybercrime.

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