fermentation | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

The World Collapses Around You

  • One document set reveals that even after TSA employees identified cancer clusters possibly linked to radiation exposure, the agency failed to issue employees dosimeters – safety devices that could assess the level of radiation exposure. Another document indicates that the DHS mischaracterized the findings of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, stating that NIST “affirmed the safety” of full body scanners. The documents obtained by EPIC reveal that NIST disputed that characterization and stated that the Institute did not, in fact, test the devices. Also, a Johns Hopkins University study revealed that radiation zones around body scanners could exceed the “General Public Dose Limit.”
  • Nearly half of all American high school students smoke, drink alcohol, or use illicit drugs, according to a new report. And one in four who started using these substances before they turned 18 may become addicts.

    One-quarter of people in the U.S. who began using drugs or alcohol before age 18 meet the criteria for drug or alcohol addiction, compared with one of 25 Americans who started using drugs or alcohol when they were 21 or older, according to the report by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University in New York City.

  • Rock’s rowdiest icon rages on about drugs, sex, rehab, plutocrats, Kurt Cobain, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Pamela Anderson’s ass.
  • In fact, intoxication with psychoactive drugs is not an exclusively human proclivity. Animals in the wild will also voluntarily and repeatedly consume psychoactive plants and fungi. Birds, elephants, and monkeys have all been reported to enthusiastically seek out fruits and berries that have fallen to the ground and undergone natural fermentation to produce alcohol. In Gabon, which lies in the western equatorial region of Africa, boars, elephants, porcupines, and gorillas have all been reported to consume the intoxicating, hallucinogenic iboga plant (Tabernanthe iboga). There is even some evidence that young elephants learn to eat iboga from observing the actions of their elders in the social group. In the highlands of Ethiopia, goats cut the middleman out of the Starbucks business model by munching wild coffee berries and catching a caffeine buzz.
  • American pop star Lady Gaga is accused of misrepresenting charitable donations from wristbands sold to benefit tsunami and earthquake victims in Japan earlier this year.

    The complaint, filed in a Michigan court on Friday by 1800lawfirm, says the star as well as her record label, Universal Music Group, and the Bravado International Group, lacked transparency surrounding the amount of money that was raised from sales of the wristbands and whether those funds were 100 per cent allocated to earthquake and tsunami victims.

    After the earthquake and tsunami disasters in March 2011 that devastated Japan, Lady Gaga created the rubber wristbands and the singer’s website advertised that all proceeds from sales of the wristband would benefit victims.

    The white rubber bracelets were sold for dollar 5 and inscribed in red with the phrase, “We pray for Japan,” in English and Japanese.

  • “Arbeit Macht Frei” is a German phrase meaning “work brings freedom” or “work shall set you free/will free you” or “work liberates” and, literally in English; “work makes free”. It became the unofficial slogan of Nazi concentration camps as the prisoners would enter the camps they would see the black wrought iron sign.

    Unicor is a U.S. government corporation of Federal Prison industries whose purpose is to train and educate prisoners. This is not the old convict chain gang cutting grass or picking up trash or making license plates.

  • A CHICAGO woman is accused of strapping her baby’s corpse into a sling and taking him shopping after killing the three-month old in a drunken rage, local media reported on Wednesday.

    Ken Blackman Jr had been dead for eight to 14 hours when the woman wrapped up her shopping trip and went to visit a neighbour, who noticed blood on the baby blanket and called 911.

  • Police in Fall River, Massachusetts are investigating the death of 36-year-old Marie Joseph after her body was discovered floating in the Veterans Memorial Pool at Lafayette Park Tuesday.

    She was pulled from the water and taken to a local hospital, where she was later pronounced dead.

    “I’m surprised she did go to the pool because she doesn’t even know how to swim,” said Dee Reid, one of the victim’s friends.

    Authorities are trying to determine if she had been in the water since Sunday and no one saw her body under the 12 feet of water.

  • A Kansas City, Missouri, man faces felony sexual assault charges after he allegedly raped a woman on a city sidewalk in broad daylight.

    According to police, Melvin L. Jackson, 49, allegedly had sex with the unconscious woman on a sidewalk outside of a vacant business at 3400 Troost around 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday morning.

    Two witnesses who flagged down a patrol car say that they saw the woman curled up in a fetal position, with Jackson on top of her with his pants and underwear around his ankles, having sex with her.

    When Kansas City Missouri Police arrived on the scene, authorities say that Jackson told them, “I thought that lady was dead.”

  • A nuclear power station in eastern Scotland had to shut down its reactors after “high volumes” of jellyfish were found on its seawater filter screens, the operating company said Thursday.

    “Both units at Torness power station were manually shut down on 28 June, due to the high volumes of jelly fish fouling the cooling water screens,” said a statement from EDF Energy, which runs the power station near Dunbar.

  • So all things considered, MySpace has cost Murdoch’s empire something like $1.3 billion. Even if my assumptions are way off, the final cost can’t be less than $1 billion. That fiasco isn’t putting Murdoch out of business: News Corp turned a $2.9 billion dollar profit in the last four quarters and generated $2.2 billion in free cash flow, for example. But it still stings as Murdoch’s dreams of an end-to-end interactive media empire falls apart. And his shareholders have been trailing the broader market as well as rivals Viacom and Disney over those five painful years.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 1, 2011

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I Love You, Too.

  • He walked with a limp and was known to some as the ‘poison dwarf’.

    But a book reveals that Nazi Germany’s propaganda chief Joseph Goebbels was an unlikely lothario, nicknamed ‘the ram’ by the many actresses and society ladies he seduced.

    Written by Peter Longerich, a history professor at the University of London, it is the first work to address Goebbels as more than simply the propaganda genius of the Third Reich.

    Manipulative and ruthless, he is also revealed as sexually obsessed and mawkishly sentimental.

  • One year ago, an elite Mossad hit squad traveled to Dubai to kill a high-ranking member of Hamas. They completed the mission, but their covers were blown, and Israel was humiliated by the twenty-seven-minute video of their movements that was posted online for all the world to see. Ronen Bergman reveals the intricate, chilling details of the mission and investigates how Israel’s vaunted spy agency did things so spectacularly wrong
  • A wine press and fermentation jars from about 6,000 years ago were found in a cave in the south Caucasus country.
  • Amateur Hour. The 2703(d) order misspelled the names of one of the targets, Rop Gonggrijp. It also requested credit card and bank account numbers of several Twitter users, even though Twitter is a free service and so doesn’t have such information (presumably someone at DOJ knows a little about Twitter, since the agency has 350,000 followers of its official Twitter account).

    The Department of Justice prosecutor named in the order, Tracy Doherty-McCormick, was prosecuting online child exploitation cases just five months before the Twitter order was issued. Given that the wikileaks investigation is the most high-profile national security investigation of the decade, and that the court order seeks records associated with an Icelandic member of parliament, you would think that DOJ would assign this case to someone more senior.

  • Sometimes it’s smart to fight fire with fire. When it comes to various diseases, though, is it really a good idea to fight them off with other diseases? Vaccines are nice to have, but there are also more “symbiotic” remedies. Given that some people aren’t quite comfortable eating genetically modified organisms (that are dead), it may be quite some time before most people are okay with infecting themselves with specific worms or bacteria.
  • To hear a number of prominent economists tell it, it doesn’t look good for the U.S. economy, not this year, not in 10 years.

    Leading thinkers in the dismal science speaking at an annual convention offered varying visions of U.S. economic decline, in the short, medium and long term. This year, the recovery may bog down as government stimulus measures dry up.

    In the long run, the United States must face up to inevitably being overtaken by China as the world’s largest economy. And it may have missed a chance to rein in its largest financial institutions, many of whom remain too big to fail and are getting bigger.

  • It’s an unlikely marriage between state-of-the-art and 40-year-old technology that has yielded extraordinary results.

    Signals from seismic sensors left on the lunar surface by Apollo astronauts in 1971 have revealed that the Moon has a liquid core similar to Earth’s.

    Scientists at Nasa applied contemporary seismological techniques to the data being emitted from sensors placed by their colleagues during the U.S. space program’s heyday.

  • The Hubble Space Telescope got its first peek at a mysterious giant green blob in outer space and found that it’s strangely alive.

    The bizarre glowing blob is giving birth to new stars, some only a couple million years old, in remote areas of the universe where stars don’t normally form.

  • On Oct. 30, 1964, TIME magazine reported on the celebration of the independence of Zambia (formerly Northern Rhodesia), with its new president, Kenneth Kaunda.

    But as the jubilant crowds celebrated, one man complained that the festivities were interfering with his “space program.” Edward Makuka Nkoloso informed the TIME reporter that his Zambian “astronauts” would beat both the US and the Soviet Union in the space race — by going to the moon, and then to Mars.

  • he recommended level of fluoride in U.S. drinking water supplies should be lowered to prevent dental problems, according to a joint announcement today by officials from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
  • Now, it’s Facebook’s turn. This week’s news that Goldman Sachs has chosen to invest in Facebook while entreating others to do the same should inspire about as much confidence as their investment in mortgage securities did in 2008. For those who weren’t watching, that’s when Goldman got rich betting against the investments it was selling.
  • The star of ‘engaged art’ is on the rise. The number of artists creating, performing, and exploring in the world of social and political reality is mushrooming. Or maybe that’s the way it has always been, and new technologies are allowing us to do end-runs around gate-keeping curators and mainstream media. Either way, we are discovering whole worlds of politically engaged and celebrated artists that not so long ago would just as likely have been escorted from the hallowed houses of high art for disturbing the peace.

    Call it what you will — engaged art, social practice, avant-garde, dialogical aesthetics, community art, public art, activist art, radical art — audiences for the confounding, beautiful, horrible and hilarious kinds of symbolic dissidence these practices describe are growing. When Art Threat started three years ago there was only a few websites like us. Now there are dozens. This is a very good thing.

  • A sinister shrine reveals a chilling occult dimension in the mind of the deranged gunman accused of shooting a member of Congress and 19 others.

    Hidden within a camouflage tent behind Jared Lee Loughner’s home sits an alarming altar with a skull sitting atop a pot filled with shriveled oranges.

    A row of ceremonial candles and a bag of potting soil lay nearby, photos reveal.

  • Mark Stephens on the BBC News also makes clear that the court order will also cover the “600,000 odd followers that Wikileaks has on Twitter“.
    The order asks specifically for names of those attached to selected accounts, user and screen names, and any registered mailing or postal addresses. It also asks for email addresses, credit card details where possible, and even content relating to connected mobile phones.
  • Thanks Dolly Diamonds
  • Upon arrival, Officers found a man victim with staples in his forehead.
    The investigation revealed that the victims girlfriend, Jodi Gilbert, struck him in the forehead with a Stanley Hammer Tacker (carpenter stapler) several times during a dispute.
  • A Portuguese male model has been charged with second-degree murder after the journalist he was visiting in New York City was found bludgeoned to death and castrated in their hotel room.
  • A Grain Valley family’s pet ferret attacked a 4-month-old boy early today, removing several of the child’s fingers.
  • Police say a Boiling Springs man bit another man’s genitals during a physical altercation early Saturday morning.

    According to state police at Carlisle, Nicholas A. Sworen, 27, bit a 32-year-old Boiling Springs man’s genitals after a struggle.

  • Two brothers were charged with killing their father, a local Afro-Brazilian religious leader, by knocking him out with sleeping pills and then burying him alive, investigators told a Brazilian news website.
  • Electronic systems that track sales of the cold medicine used to make methamphetamine have failed to curb the drug trade and instead created a vast, highly lucrative market for profiteers to buy over-the-counter pills and sell them to meth producers at a huge markup.

    An Associated Press review of federal data shows that the lure of such easy money has drawn thousands of new people into the methamphetamine underworld over the last few years.

  • A Box Elder man who had three warrants for his arrest allegedly gave a false name to Great Falls Police during a traffic stop, but ended up going to jail anyway because there also was a warrant out for the name he gave police.
  • A map marking what are supposed to be secret locations of 60 warehouses and other buildings where medical marijuana is grown in Boulder has accidentally been made public by the city.

    State law prohibits local governments from disclosing the location of so-called cultivation centers, and state lawmakers have exempted records that contain identifying information about the sites from the Colorado Open Records Act out of fear that would-be thieves might target large growing operations.

  • A 20-year-old Caruthersville man was arrested last week after driving his vehicle backward with no head lights on East 12th Street, police said.
    According to local authorities, upon conducting a traffic stop, officers saw the driver, Markus Young, drop a marijuana cigarette out of the window. Officers seized the marijuana and arrested Young. He was taken to the Pemiscot County Jail, where he was processed and later released after posting a $379.50 cash bond.
    Police said several baggies of marijuana were found in the vehicle and seized as evidence.
    Thanks Patrick Nybakken
  • Graffiti has long been part of the L.A. streetscape, to the dismay of many. L.A. spends millions cleaning it up. But now, there is a proposal to cut the budget for tagging removal amid the city’s budget crisis. Reports the Los Angeles Times’ Kate Linthicum:

    The top financial advisor to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa recommended that the city slash the graffiti-removal budget in half as part of a round of short-term cuts.

  • Black holes get their name because they absorb all incoming light, and are so dense that none of that light can escape their event horizon. In a new study, scientists have created a sonic analogue of a black hole in the lab – that is, a sonic black hole in which sound waves rather than light waves are absorbed and cannot escape. The scientists hope that the short-lived sonic black hole could allow them to observe and study the elusive Hawking radiation that is predicted to be emitted by traditional black holes, which has so far been a very difficult task.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Well, Show Me The Way To The Next Diabetic Piss Whiskey Bar

  • The malware on the Spanair computer has been identified as a type of Trojan horse. It could have entered the airline’s system in a number of ways, according to Jamz Yaneeza, head threat researcher at Trend Micro. Some of the most likely ways are through third party devices such as USB sticks, Yaneeza said, which were responsible for the International Space Station virus infection in 2008, or through a remote VPN connection that may not have the same protection as a computer within the enterprise network. Opening just one malicious file on a single computer is all it takes to infect an entire system. “Any computer that is connected to a network is vulnerable to a malware infection,” O. Sami Saydjari, president of Cyber Defense Agency, told TechNewsDaily. “Standards have not been set to protect critical infrastructure.” An incident like this could happen again, and most likely will, according to Saydjari.
  • Whisky Export. Sugar heavy urine excreted by diabetic patients is now being utilized for the fermentation of high-end single malt whisky for export. The Whisky market is growing faster then any other alcoholic beverage worldwide. With a prevalent genetic weakness being exposed in the northern hemisphere leading to a sharp rise in type two diabetes, economists have found a new exportable commodity to exploit and are keento capitalize on this resource quickly.
  • But how will the authorities raise the $10bn they say they need to make this plan a reality? They say they are talking to investors but it is all a bit vague. Although there is plenty of oil in southern Sudan, people there are extremely poor. The United Nations says more than 90% of the population lives on less than a dollar a day.
  • A Nevada judge has issued a homework assignment in the form of an unusual sentence for a 25-year-old Sacramento man who sold marijuana to a police informant in a casino parking lot at Lake Tahoe. District Judge Dave Gamble ordered Matthew Palazzolo to write a report on what the judge called the “nonsensical character” of California’s medical marijuana law.
  • If mine were truly a free country, US police wouldn’t wield such immense power or employ such aggressive tactics against their own citizenry – a militarisation of our police forces that started with the war on drugs and intensified after 9/11. Consider: can you invent a realistic scenario wherein you shoot a man dead; justify it with a story witnesses contradict; confiscate any surveillance video; claim a “glitch” makes it impossible to show the video to anyone else – all while enjoying the support of state legal apparatus?
  • Madonna’s 13-year-old daughter Lourdes Leon (a.k.a. Lola) was spotted with a Rasta-colored pot-leaf wristband. Madonna has admitted to using marijuana and other drugs in the past.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death