Fuck Facebook | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe - Part 2

Mystery Rebel Has Millions Cheering

  • A yearlong sting operation, including aliases, a 5 a.m. surprise inspection and surreptitious purchases from an Amish farm in Pennsylvania, culminated in the federal government announcing this week that it has gone to court to stop Rainbow Acres Farm from selling its contraband to willing customers in the Washington area.

    The product in question: unpasteurized milk.

  • Activists are claiming that dozens of politically linked Facebook accounts have been removed or suspended by the company in the last 12 hours.

    The list of suspended pages include those for the anti cuts group UK Uncut, and pages that were created by students during last December’s university occupations.

    A list posted on the UCL occupation blog site says the Goldsmiths Fights Back, Slade Occupation, Open Brikbeck, and Tower Hamlet Greens pages as no longer functioning.

    It is not yet known how many websites have been affected in total or why they are not working. Facebook is currently looking into the issue.

    Guy Aitchison, 26, an administrator for one of the non-functioning pages said, “I woke up this morning to find that a lot of the groups we’d been using for anti-cuts activity had disappeared. The timing of it seems suspicious given a general political crackdown because of the royal wedding.”

  • Toshiso Kosako, a professor at the prestigious University of Tokyo, said at a news conference that the prime minister’s office and agencies within the government “have ignored the laws and have only dealt with the problem at the moment.” Holding back tears, he said this approach would only prolong the crisis.
  • Don’t blame American appetites, rising oil prices, or genetically modified crops for rising food prices. Wall Street’s at fault for the spiraling cost of food.
  • Internet exposes scene of anti-prostitution where naked whoremonger scales building to escape

    Recently, an internet post has been circulating on various major discussion forums, the poster having used a camera to capture a comical site during a Changchun anti-prostitution surprise inspection/raid. The poster said: April 26th, didn’t have class in the afternoon so I went to hang out with a friend, heard some noise outside the window, and at this time saw people running on the roof of the building across from us. Thinking that something was about to happen, I picked up my camera to observe and it was at this moment that the following scene happened. Only later did I find out that it was an anti-prostitution raid.

  • Most people are familiar with how the story goes. Intelligent middle class white loner, abused as a youth, a bed-wetter until puberty with a morbid fascination of torturing animals as a teen, snaps and begins killing people as an adult. The names and stories of Ted Bundy, John Wayne Gacy, Robert Lee Yates and dozens of others fit this description and seem make this idea credible. Turn on the television or read a fiction book about serial killers and this is the idea portrayed, in nearly every instance, serial killers are always white. But is this always correct? The answer is resoundingly, no!
  • Lara Logan has spoken out for the first time since her terrifying sexual assault in Egypt, describing how attackers raped her with their hands.

    The 39-year-old CBS foreign correspondent said she was convinced she was going to die when the frenzied mob tore her away from her film crew and bodyguard in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

    A group of at least 200 men beat her, pinched her and tore at her clothes in a 40-minute attack which only ended when a group of women came to her aid.

  • Nationwide, about 22% of sanitary sewer overflows are caused by accumulations of a hard, gucky, adhesive substance called FOG, short for “fats, oils and grease.” But until now, no one knew exactly what it was or how it formed.
    A team of environmental engineers at North Carolina State University in Raleigh have been working since 2004 to unravel the mystery. What they’ve found comes as a surprise: The grayish-white, gritty formations that look like stalagmites along the walls of big sewer pipes are actually soap. “But this isn’t Ivory,” says Joel Ducoste, a professor of environmental science at the university. “We’re creating soap in the sewers but it’s not something you’d want to wash your face with.” 

  • Early-stage investors and employees are worried the bubble might be about to burst.

    A group of shareholders want to offload $1billion of Facebook shares on the secondary market in a sale that would value the company at more than $70 billion.

    It would be one of the largest Facebook share transactions to date and show concern that the social networking site’s growth cannot keep pace with its market valuation.

  • A 21-year-old man who plunged in his car 200 feet over the South Rim of the Grand Canyon has walked away with minor injuries.

    A spokesperson for Grand Canyon National Park said the man’s vehicle landed in a tree 200 feet below Twin Overlooks on Desert View Drive.

    The incident occurred Monday around 7:45 p.m. when the man said he accidentally drove his vehicle over the rim. When the vehicle came to rest, he said he crawled out, climbed back up to the rim and flagged a passing motorist, who called park rangers.

  • The U.S. economy is dying and we are heading for the next Great Depression. The talking heads in the mainstream media love to spin the economic numbers around and around and they love to make it sound like the economy is improving, but the truth is that it doesn’t take a genius to see what is happening to the U.S. economic system. All over the nation many of our greatest cities are being slowly but surely transformed into post-apocalyptic wastelands. All over the mid-Atlantic, all along the Gulf coast, all throughout the “rust belt” and all over the entire state of California cities that once had incredibly vibrant economies are being turned into rotting, post-industrial hellholes.
  • It is being done purposely and it is being done by design. Many Americans like to think of themselves as “well off”, but as will be demonstrated below, we don’t “own” nearly as much as we think that we do. The truth is that most of us have to frantically run around accumulating wealth as rapidly as we can so that we can somehow stay ahead of the rate that wealth is being taken away from us. The entire system is designed to take what you have away from you. There are many ways that this is accomplished – taxation, inflation, debt, interest, fines, fees, tickets, government seizures and good old-fashioned corporate greed. If you tried to just sit back and do nothing but hold on to the wealth that you already have you would find out that it would disappear rather quickly. When you take the time to really analyze our system the conclusion is undeniable – everything that you think that you own is being systematically taken away from you.
  • “Awesome! Now I can take pictures of cute girls at the grocery store or at the park, upload them and Facebook will tell me who they are! (I’m pretty sure that’s not [how] it works but I’m sure it will get there.)”

    The commenter’s confidence says a lot: Facial recognition may be just one more way for Facebook to push the visual part of the social graph (photos of us) toward being more public and far less private. Facebook has a history of asking for forgiveness after the fact instead of asking for permission in advance, and its new face-recognition feature could become the latest example of a seemingly innocuous development morphing into a serious threat to the privacy of our (visual) data. And as usual, some Facebook users will like the convenience of the new features so much that they will forget the privacy trade-off altogether, or just choose not to worry about it.

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Where Eagles Dare

  • The extremely rare encounter happened in a flash, said Craig Koppie, an eagle coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. An adult eagle was enjoying a breakfast of fresh deer carcass that lay across the tracks near Aberdeen, Md., along the heavily used Northeast rail corridor.

    As the Northeast Regional 111 train chugged south about 8:30 a.m., an engineer spotted the majestic bird and blasted his horn. At first, the eagle didn’t budge, Koppie said. Then it slowly took off – too late. The train arrived at Washington Union Station two hours later with the bird stuck to the locomotive like an emblem.

  • One of the more bizarre aspects of officials sanctioning raves at the publicly owned L.A. Coliseum and Sports Arena is that Los Angeles County health authorities have actually embarked on a campaign to teach young people how to take ecstasy safely.

    Under the strategy of “harm reduction” — if you’re going to get wasted, mind as well help you do so without killing yourself — the county this year will distribute fliers at raves that give tips that essentially amount to advice on how not to O.D. on this illicit, schedule 1 drug.

  • A student in Connecticut stunned police dispatchers when he dialled 911 to ask how much trouble he could get in by growing marijuana.

    When told he could get arrested he said ‘thank you’ and hung up, only for police to trace the call and arrest him when they found drug growing equipment and pot at the house.

  • The Project Space Planes team – fronted by Joel Veitch, a British web animator – is attempting to snatch the world record for the longest flight by a paper plane.

    It launched a weather balloon carrying 200 of the planes on Tuesday from a site near Wolfsburg, Germany.

    The planes were released once the balloon reached an altitude of about 36,500m and a video camera captured the projectiles gliding toward the Earth’s cloud cover below. The balloon then burst at about 37,339m and arrived back on the ground within 40 minutes, over 300km from the launch site.

  • The drug called “Spice” has been banned in the Navy. However, 150 sailors have been discharged within the past 4 months, all because of the substance, including 16 from the Norfolk-based USS Bataan yesterday.

    Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens says, “It’s not acceptable the number of sailors that are using it.”

    Stevens says the spice problem is widespread. Spice is a synthetic drug, nicknamed “Legal Weed,” and can be purchased over-the-counter in most states. A ban is being considered in both Virginia and North Carolina, but while it’s legal for civilians, using it in the Navy will get you discharged.

  • Mark Zuckerberg announced that Facebook will be shut down in March. Managing the site has become too stressful.

    “Facebook has gotten out of control,” said Zuckerberg in a press conference outside his Palo Alto office, “and the stress of managing this company has ruined my life. I need to put an end to all the madness.”

    Zuckerberg went on to explain that starting March 15th, users will no longer be able to access their Facebook accounts.

    “After March 15th the whole website shuts down,” said Avrat Humarthi, Vice President of Technical Affairs at Facebook. “So if you ever want to see your pictures again, I recommend you take them off the internet. You won’t be able to get them back after Facebook goes out of business.”

  • ata encryption and storage has always been an important branch of research in computer engineering. In our project, we explored the possibility of harnessing a biological system as an alternative solution for data en/decryption and storage. Using bacteria as the information storage device is not new. However the practicability of previous research is being doubt due to the limited size of information available to be inserted into the bacteria.

    We recognized the current barricades in developing a truly useful system and we forecasted the indispensable modules that one would be anticipating when putting fantasy into reality. This year, we have proposed a model that is a true, massively parallel bacterial data storage system.

  • Legendary stripper and burlesque dancer “Blaze Starr” was born Fannie Belle Fleming in 1932, in West Virginia. She ran-away when she was fifteen yrs old, and ended up in Washington, D.C., where she was discovered working as a hat-check girl by her first manager Red Snyder– who convinced her to strip. It was Snyder who gave her the stagename “Blaze Starr.” Their time together would be short lived after he tried to rape her. With her fiery red hair, and voluptuous 38D-24-37 figure, and sultry, energetic and captivating stage presence (her stage routines included a comedic exploding coach gag and having a large trained black panther untie a ribbon on her costume which made it fall to the floor), Blaze became a major headliner at the “Two O`Clock Club” in Baltimore, Maryland and earned the nicknames “Miss Spontaneous Combustion” and “The Hottest Blaze in Burlesque.”

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All Cybereyez On You

  • Attack toolkits are software programs that can be used by novices and experts alike to facilitate the launch of widespread attacks on networked computers. These kits enable the attacker to easily launch numerous pre-written threats against computer systems. They also provide the ability to customize threats in order to evade detection, as well as automating the attack process.

    “In the past, hackers had to create their own threats from scratch. This complex process limited the number of attackers to a small pool of highly skilled cybercriminals,” said Stephen Trilling, senior vice president, Symantec Security Technology and Response. “Today’s attack toolkits make it relatively easy for even a malicious novice to launch a cyberattack. As a result, we expect to see even more criminal activity in this area and a higher likelihood that the average user will be victimized.”

  • A Hamburg court is trying to make sense of a pirate attack off the coast of Somalia last April. But even as many hope the trial will produce a precedent for Europe’s approach to high seas crime, the court can’t even figure out how old the suspects are. The challenges to justice are immense.
  • In a talk at the Black Hat DC conference here Tuesday, Tom Parker, a security consultant, presented a compelling case that Stuxnet may be the product of a collaboration between two disparate groups, perhaps a talented group of programmers that produced most of the code and exploits and a less sophisticated group that may have adapted the tool for its eventual use. Parker analyzed the code in Stuxnet and looked at both the quality of the code itself as well as how well it did what it was designed to do, and found several indications that the code itself is not very well done, but was still highly effective on some levels.
  • Well-coordinated cyber attacks around the world could cause a “full-scale global shock” on a huge scale similar to collapsing financial structures, pandemics, long-term pollution and other mega disasters, but the threat of such attacks is currently not very high, according to a study released by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).
  • But, the main issue that remains to be addressed is that of security. Analog surveillance systems were difficult to hack into by people who lacked the adequate knowledge, but IP cameras – having their own IPs – can be quite easily physically located and their stream watched in real-time by anyone who has a modicum of computer knowledge and knows what to search for on Google.

    “Once an IP camera is installed and online, users can access it using its own individual internal or external IP address, or by connecting to its NVR (or both),” explains Connor. “In either case, users need only load a simple browser-based applet (typically Flash, Java, or ActiveX) to view live or recorded video, control cameras, or check their settings.”

  • A stained glass window in a small church has caused a sensation in France. Unveiled in 1941, it depicts Adolf Hitler executing a saint who symbolizes the Jewish people. Local priests have praised the work as a brave act of resistance against the Nazi occupiers.
  • Kratz filed a response today to a suit by Stephanie Van Groll, who claims Kratz violated her constitutional rights when he sent her text messages like: “Are u the kind of girl that likes secret contact with an older married elected DA…the riskier the better? Or do you want to stop right now before any issues?” At the time, Kratz was overseeing Van Groll’s domestic abuse case against her boyfriend. The suit argues that “under Wisconsin law, witnesses have the right to be protected from harm arising out of their cooperation with law enforcement.”

    Kratz’s response argued that he “acted in a manner that was proper, reasonable, lawful and in exercise of good faith and reasonable standards of conduct at all relevant times,” and that “if any injuries were suffered by the Plaintiff, all such injuries and damages were caused by her own conduct, negligence and behavior,” or through that of a third party.

  • Try posting something to LiveJournal about the controversial trial of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, for instance.

    Your LiveJournal account will quickly be struck by a massive bot attack. These bots are nothing like the commercial LiveJournal bots that we’ve discussed before that are quiet, unobtrusive, and pretend to be human.

    The “political” LiveJournal bots post 20 or more huge comments in a row. They don’t bother to disguise their obviously auto-generated usernames, and often comment with inappropriate pictures or jokes.

  • Before he rose to notoriety as the founder of Penthouse magazine, Bob Guccione allegedly wrote letters soliciting customers to buy his dirty photos at the bargain rate of 10 photos for $2 under the pseudonym of “Robert Gucci.”

    That’s just part of what is revealed by the more than sixty pages of FBI records on Guccione obtained by TPM through a Freedom of Information Act request. Guccione died in October at the age of 79.

    Until now, it was widely held that Guccione got into the business in 1964 with the founding of Penthouse. But the new information unveiled in an FBI file from 1964 shows that a “Gucci” who shared an address with Guccione had been under investigation in 1956 for “sending obscene photographs through the mail.”

  • The family of Delvonte Tisdale, the 16-year-old boy who appears to have fallen to his death while stowing away inside the landing gear of a U.S. Airways airliner flying from Charlotte, NC, to Boston, MA, last November, has retained a Florida-based personal injury attorney, Christopher Chestnut, who has suggested that lax airport security contributed to the teenager’s death.

    “We intend to seek justice for a child who, although culpable for making irresponsible and immature decisions representative of his age, should never have successfully gained access to that airplane,” said Chestnut, in a Jan. 18 press release announcing that his Gainesville, FL, law firm, The Chestnut Firm, has been retained by Tisdale’s family.

  • Two delusional patients who believed that friends and relatives had died, despite them being around to prove otherwise, are described in an amazing 2005 journal article from the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

    Although the Cotard delusion is well studied in psychiatry, where patients believe themselves to be dead, the report names the novel belief that another living person has died ‘Odysseus Syndrome’ – after the Greek legend where Penelope continued to believe that Odysseus had died, even after returning home from battle.

  • Facebook has been pushing the boundaries of privacy for a long time, but despite the uproar, few in the community have abandoned the service. It is great news that Facebook is responding to the outrage about this recent change, but I wonder if most users will be satisfied with their eventual solution.

    People are willing to accept the constant evolution of technology, but are not always willing to accept others’ ideas of how their privacy should evolve along with it. While Facebook does alert users to the fact that this information will be shared with others, warning prompts and other pop-ups are so frequent that they are frequently ignored. Users still place a great deal of trust in Facebook, and the service has an obligation to live up to that expectation.

  • Anti-government sentiment is not cause for fear, a sign of insanity, or a precursor of tragedy. Quite the contrary. Anti-government sentiment signifies attentiveness, understanding, and a love of liberty. If you truly value freedom, then you absolutely must distrust and despise government with every fiber of your being. Why? Government has no ability, whatsoever, to give freedom to anyone. Government can only take freedoms away. Our founding fathers fully understood this fundamental truth. They did not view government as a potential source of good, but as a necessary evil. Although they understood that limited government would be necessary to protect individual citizens from each other, they also understood that the Constitution would be necessary to protect all citizens from the government. Our founding fathers knew that if they did not restrain the government with the constitution, then nothing would stop it from taking all of our liberties away.
  • 48% of 18-34 year olds check Facebook when they wake up
    The 35+ Demographic represents 30% of Facebook Users
    71% of the web audience in the US is on Facebook
    70% of Facebook users reside outside of the US
  • A full 17 percent of those ages 18-29 said yes, that violence would be justified, while a further 15 percent were not “not sure.” Granted, while those figures come out to a clear majority of young people — 68 percent — saying violence is not justified, it also means that 32 percent either disagree or haven’t made up their minds.

    Another statistic sure to surprise some beltway liberals were the responses of poor people, who tied with tea partiers at 13 percent in saying violence would be justified. A further 24 percent said they weren’t sure, bringing their level of certainty against violence down to just 63 percent.

    Compounding the potential for civil unrest, the poor and the tea parties, according to prior statistics, were two very different, separate groups with virtually no cross-over.

  • A newly revealed 1997 letter from the Vatican warned Ireland’s Catholic bishops not to report all suspected child-abuse cases to police — a disclosure with the potential to fuel more lawsuits worldwide against the Vatican, which has long denied any involvement in coverups.

    The letter, obtained by Irish broadcasters RTE and provided to The Associated Press, documents the Vatican’s rejection of an Irish church initiative to begin helping police identify pedophile priests.

    The letter’s message undermines persistent Vatican claims that the church never instructed bishops to withhold evidence or suspicion of crimes from police. Instead, the letter emphasizes the church’s right to handle all child-abuse allegations and determine punishments in house rather than hand that power to civil authorities.

  • Though American and Israeli officials refuse to talk publicly about what goes on at Dimona, the operations there, as well as related efforts in the United States, are among the newest and strongest clues suggesting that the virus was designed as an American-Israeli project to sabotage the Iranian program.

    In recent days, the retiring chief of Israel’s Mossad intelligence agency, Meir Dagan, and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton separately announced that they believed Iran’s efforts had been set back by several years. Mrs. Clinton cited American-led sanctions, which have hurt Iran’s ability to buy components and do business around the world.

  • The thing is, the SEC heavily regulates the IPO process, because (officially) it doesn’t want companies to abuse the process, lie to investors, trick them into buying shares in something they don’t understand or that’s really much riskier, etc. We’ve discussed in the past, and years back, VentureBeat had a great article that noted many startups appeared to violate the basics of SEC regulations even in just saying they were raising money from private investors, because just talking about it publicly can be seen as a form of a “public offering.” It seems that Goldman was becoming worried that all of the public scrutiny on this deal was suddenly getting mighty close to being a “public offering” type of situation, in which the SEC could conceivably step in and claim that it needs to follow all of the standard IPO rules — which it had not been doing. Goldman has apparently hoped to keep everything a lot more quiet, but the NY Times broke the story, and then everyone else piled on.
  • The “crack tax” is a name given to the taxes on illegal drugs in Tennessee. The tax, under a law passed by the Tennessee General Assembly in January 2005, is applied to illegal substances including cocaine, marijuana, and moonshine. Drug dealers are required to pay anonymously at the state revenue office, where they receive a stamp to prove their payment. If a drug dealer is arrested without having a stamp, the state would seek the money owed it. 22 other states have drug collection laws similar to the crack tax in Tennessee; the law was based upon that of North Carolina’s.
    Thanks Naw

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