Fukushima Daiichi | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe - Part 2

Put A Band-Aid On It!

  • The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant says it lost control of an unmanned helicopter during a flight near the No. 2 reactor building, forcing the controller to make an emergency landing on a roof there.

    Tokyo Electric Power Company says the remote-controlled light helicopter took off from an observatory south of the Fukushima plant just past 6:30 AM on Friday. Its mission was to collect airborne radioactive substances around the No. 2 reactor building.

    The utility says its engine failed about 30 minutes later, making it impossible for the aircraft to ascend.

    The helicopter — 50 centimeters long and weighing 8 kilograms — was found lying on its side on the rooftop.

  • She claims that “during the course of these after-hours appointments, the plaintiff was placed under sedation by defendant Adams for the purposes, ostensibly, of defendant Adams conducting internal vaginal examinations and procedures including, but not limited to, internal ultrasounds of the plaintiff.”
    She says Adams prescribed large amounts of medication which was contraindicated in her conditions.
    “Over the course of the treatment regimen, defendant Adams insured that the plaintiff became dependent on the large volume of prescription drugs provided by defendant Adams to his patient … (H)e assured her that the prescription drugs being prescribed were necessary for her treatment and pain management,” the complaint states.
  • As typically happens in Russia, Pavlova began her drug use as a teenager shooting a substance called khanka, a tarlike opiate cooked from poppy bulbs, then graduated to heroin and finally, at the age of 27, switched to krokodil, because it has roughly the same effect as heroin but is at least three times cheaper and extremely easy to make. The active component is codeine, a widely sold over-the-counter painkiller that is not toxic on its own. But to produce krokodil, whose medical name is desomorphine, addicts mix it with ingredients including gasoline, paint thinner, hydrochloric acid, iodine and red phosphorous, which they scrape from the striking pads on matchboxes. In 2010, between a few hundred thousand and a million people, according to various official estimates, were injecting the resulting substance into their veins in Russia, so far the only country in the world to see the drug grow into an epidemic.
  • Philip Fursman has been buying plain models from a UK company, painting them and then selling them on the eBay website for a number of years for a small profit.

    But Mr Fursman from Card, Somerset, fell foul of the site’s policies when he tried to sell a model of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler.

    However, similar models of Osama bin Laden used in war games are allowed.

    The 37 year-old father-of-three said he was surprised by the policy because he had recently sold miniature figures of Osama bin Laden and the Taliban on eBay without any problem.

  • When art copies art

    The Flavour of Tears is established as a bona fide original, but René Magritte and his fellow Surrealists were no strangers to the dark arts of forgery. Magritte made a living during the Nazi occupation of Belgium by forging Picassos and Renoirs. Fellow artist Marcel Mariën would sell them on to private collectors.

    The Surrealist movement explores the tension of the real and the unreal, and Magritte may well have seen his forgeries as part that conflict. Playing a joke on the aficionados, he hung his forgery of Max Ernst’s The Forest in place of the original in 1943.

    Fellow Surrealist Giorgio de Chirico, in his later years, produced what he called “self-forgeries” of his earlier, more popular style. He would backdate them to fool the critics; ironic revenge for their attacks on his later works.

  • The name krokodil comes from its trademark side effect: scaly green skin like a crocodile around the injection site. TIME calls it “the dirty cousin of morphine,” because it’s three times cheaper than heroin and very easy to make, being that its main ingredient is codeine, a behind-the-counter drug that has sent many of America’s famous rap community to prison.

    The medical name of krokodil is desomorphine. A quick search for that will bring up graphic images of people with swollen faces, exposed bones and muscles and skin rotting off on any given body part.

    The reason the drug is so anatomically destructive is due to its mix-ins. Users stir in ingredients “including gasoline, paint thiner, hydrochloric acid, iodine and red phosphorus which they scrape from the striking pads on matchboxes,” reports TIME.

  • The Federal Communications Commission adopted new rules Thursday that increase the penalties for faking caller ID information in order to commit fraud or harm consumers.

    The practice, known as caller ID “spoofing,” can still be used for legal purposes such as safeguarding the privacy of individuals. But the commission argues spoofing is increasingly used for malicious purposes such as identity theft or placing false emergency calls to police.

    “Far too often, though, fake caller IDs are used by bad actors to get money from consumers, steal consumers’ identities, or stalk or harass,” said Joel Gurin and Sharon Gillett, the chiefs of the FCC’s Consumer and Wireline bureaus, respectively, in a statement.

  • Federal regulators are poised to hit Google Inc. with subpoenas, launching a broad, formal investigation into whether the Internet giant has abused its dominance in Web-search advertising, people familiar with the matter said.
  • After years of negotiations, a group of bandwidth providers that includes AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon are closer than ever to striking a deal with media and entertainment companies that would call for them to establish new and tougher punishments for customers who refuse to stop using their networks to pirate films, music and other intellectual property, multiple sources told CNET.
  • With more than 700 bulletins, email archives, images and other files, the 440MB package will keep readers busy for days. A few excerpts from the most obviously newsworthy documents follow.
  • The “limited kinetic action” in Libya has been one of the most misrepresented, selectively covered, and tragic imperialistic NATO adventures in recent history. We are presented a picture of a madman, frothing at the mouth, slaughtering civilians whenever possible. We are shown a Libya that is united against Qaddafi, with a population that wants NATO to save them and help depose the evil Qaddafi. But is this true?

    In fact, this is only a very small part of a large, complex picture. However, the Western media refuses to show their audience the entire reality while they are in fact there in Libya, able to fully appreciate the events. This just goes to show the strict gatekeeper aspect of Western mainstream media in which only certain things get covered and a very select few become major stories.

  • With Boise rainfall samples measuring by far the highest concentrations of radioactive nuclides in the country, apocalyptic rumors of nuclear disaster run rampant. Higher cancer rates, lower SAT scores, genetic mutations, and birth defects are just a few of the things doomsayers expect to see in the wake of the nuclear disaster at Fukushima’s Daiichi plant. But if the nuclear scare has you dumping milk and fleeing from radioactive rain, you might want to put the dangers into perspective.
  • In Sept. 1859, on the eve of a below-average1 solar cycle, the sun unleashed one of the most powerful storms in centuries. The underlying flare was so unusual, researchers still aren’t sure how to categorize it. The blast peppered Earth with the most energetic protons in half-a-millennium, induced electrical currents that set telegraph offices on fire, and sparked Northern Lights over Cuba and Hawaii.

    This week, officials have gathered at the National Press Club in Washington DC to ask themselves a simple question: What if it happens again?

    “A similar storm today might knock us for a loop,” says Lika Guhathakurta, a solar physicist at NASA headquarters. “Modern society depends on high-tech systems such as smart power grids, GPS, and satellite communications–all of which are vulnerable to solar storms.”

  • After visiting a Taichung beef noodle restaurant in July 2008, where she had dried noodles and side dishes, Liu wrote that the restaurant served food that was too salty, the place was unsanitary because there were cockroaches and that the owner was a “bully” because he let customers park their cars haphazardly, leading to traffic jams.
  • Police believe they have tracked down a missing portrait of Farrah Fawcett.
  • Penn & Teller call BULLSHIT!
  • The International Bottled Water Association on Wednesday took on what it described as a “a myth repeated by some anti-bottled water activists that bottled water which comes from municipal water sources is just tap water in a bottle.”

    At least one group opposed to bottled water, however, shrugged at the public-relations gambit, suggesting that no matter how much processing is involved, bottled water is, on its face, an unnecessary product.

  • Remember Kind of Bloop, the chiptune tribute to Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue that I produced? I went out of my way to make sure the entire project was above board, licensing all the cover songs from Miles Davis’s publisher and giving the total profits from the Kickstarter fundraiser to the five musicians that participated.

    But there was one thing I never thought would be an issue: the cover art.

  • Roosters looking to get a little action in local henhouses must first produce a clean bill of health under a newly adopted law regulating romantic interactions among chickens in backyard farms.

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on June 24, 2011

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Not Sane For Work

  • I’ll be honest, I had some trouble with this request. I thought I’d seen some messed up stuff on the internet, but something about bugs really gets to me. Oh well, to each their own
  • A Chinese company has unveiled a sex robot which it claims can recognise – and even chat to – its owner.

    The 5ft 5ins robot has realistic skin and muscles made of silicon gel on an advanced medical metal skeleton.

    Love Sex Company manager Li Jian said the £3,000 robots were aimed at well-paid executives who were too busy to meet real women.

    Customers could choose the face and figure of their robot which would be programmed to recognise its owner’s face and hold conversations with him, or her, in a choice of languages.

    It can also be controlled remotely to take up different positions and some body parts can even shake, added Li.

  • His 186-pound tumor is record-breaking, but the size of his smile is what’s really remarkable about Nguyen Duy Hai.

    The 31-year-old Vietnamese man has had a tumor growing on his right leg since soon after he was born.

    Despite having an amputation at the knee 14 years ago, he still has a growth wider than three feet.

  • In reality, in China, the word kung fu can also relate to non-martial arts contexts and can come to mean any individual accomplishment or skill cultivated through long and hard work.

    Bai Dengchun, age 23, who hails from northern China’s Shandong Province, can throw cards with such force and accuracy that from as far as 16 feet away he can slice a cucumber or burst a balloon. He can also crack an egg or knock off the end of a lit cigarette from a smoker’s mouth.

  • Baltimore police confirmed that the officer was riding in the passenger seat of an unmarked patrol car Wednesday while cruising down Hanover Street when he felt something on the back of his neck.

    The officer swiped at his neck and discovered the big rodent crawling up his back, police said. The rat bit his palm and thumb before the officer was able to throw it out of the car window.

  • A 55 feet long fish has been found in the seashore of Guangdong, China.

    According to a local newspaper, the big fish weighs at least 10,000 pounds.

    Hwang, a 66-years-old fisherman living in the near area, said he has never seen anything like this in his whole life and that the fish was tied with ropes when it was first found.

  • Thousands of bicyclists took to the streets of Portland, Oregon on Saturday night, riding in hordes across meandering avenues of asphalt on their two-wheelers.

    As 20-somethings populate the Pacific Northwest hipster hub and rally for bicyclists rights and recognition of their rides, is it really all that weird? Not quite. Until you do it bare-ass naked, that is. That’s what most of them did on Saturday’s moon-lit annual installment of the World Naked Bike Ride.

  • Iraq’s parliament speaker tells Al Jazeera unaccounted reconstruction money is three times the reported $6.6bn.
  • In a new report, they warn that ocean life is “at high risk of entering a phase of extinction of marine species unprecedented in human history”.

    They conclude that issues such as over-fishing, pollution and climate change are acting together in ways that have not previously been recognised.

    The impacts, they say, are already affecting humanity.

  • Initially an announcement on the underground barrier was due to be made to the press on June 14, but it was put off until after TEPCO’s general shareholders meeting on June 28.

    In the meantime, the state of the nuclear power plant continues to deteriorate and radioactive materials are eerily spreading and contaminating the area around the plant.

    Which is more important: upholding share prices or stopping pollution? The Japanese political and business world has sunk to a level where it can’t even answer such a question.

  • Representing the first time the substance has been detected at the crippled plant, the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) reported on Sunday that seawater and groundwater samples taken near the ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility in Japan have tested positive for radioactive strontium. And according to a recent report in The Japan Times, levels of strontium detected were up to 240 times over the legal limit, indicating a serious environmental and health threat.
  • In news that will surely set off a whole lot of red flags and pique the interest of many, Green Mile actor Doug Hutchison tied the knot with singer Courtney Stodden this week. Not sure why that’s newsworthy or so interesting? Well, Hutchison is 51 years old, and Stodden is … wait for it … 16.
  • The crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is still leaking and, judging from the experience at Chernobyl, Japan’s recovery won’t be measured in years, but centuries.
  • As record floodwaters along the Missouri River drench homes and businesses, concerns have grown about keeping a couple of notable structures dry: two riverside nuclear power plants in Nebraska.
  • As the mainstream media continues to be obsessed with Anthony Weiner and his bizarre adventures on Twitter, much more serious events are happening around the world that are getting very little attention. In America today, if the mainstream media does not cover something it is almost as if it never happened. Right now, the worst nuclear disaster in human history continues to unfold in Japan , U.S. nuclear facilities are being threatened by flood waters, the U.S. military is bombing Yemen, gigantic cracks in the earth are appearing all over the globe and the largest wildfire in Arizona history is causing immense devastation. But Anthony Weiner, Bristol Palin and Miss USA are what the mainstream media want to tell us about and most Americans are buying it.
  • Check out the smooth dance moves this gorilla pulls off! Think you could do better than that?
  • Yes, we’re a “nation of immigrants,” but I don’t recall anyone swimming around Ellis Island to get here.

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Big Bro Watchin’ Yo

  • The scale of the problem in Latin America is not known, but a recent survey of emergency hospital admissions in Bogotá, Colombia, found that around 70 per cent of patients drugged with burundanga had also been robbed, and around three per cent sexually assaulted. “The most common symptoms are confusion and amnesia,” says Juliana Gomez, a Colombian psychiatrist who treats victims of burundanga poisoning. “It makes victims disoriented and sedated so they can be easily robbed.” Medical evidence verifies this, but news reports allude to another, more sinister, effect: that the drug removes free will, effectively turning victims into suggestible human puppets. Although not fully understood by neuroscience, free will is seen as a highly complex neurological ability and one of the most cherished of human characteristics. Clearly, if a drug can eliminate this, it highlights a stark vulnerability at the core of our species.
  • There is one entire country, however, that Google Earth won’t show you: Israel.

    That’s because, in 1997, Congress passed the National Defense Authorization Act, one section of which is titled, “Prohibition on collection and release of detailed satellite imagery relating to Israel.” The amendment, known as the Kyl-Bingaman Amendment, calls for a federal agency, the NOAA’s Commercial Remote Sensing Regulatory Affairs, to regulate the dissemination of zoomed-in images of Israel.

    When asked about the regulation, a Google spokeswoman said to Mother Jones, “The images in Google Earth are sourced from a wide range of both commercial and public sources. We source our satellite imagery from US-based companies who are subject to US law, including the Kyl-Bingaman Amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act of 1997, which limits the resolution of imagery of Israel that may be commercially distributed.”

  • Future Attribute Screening Technology (FAST), a US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) programme designed to spot people who are intending to commit a terrorist act, has in the past few months completed its first round of field tests at an undisclosed location in the northeast, Nature has learned.

    Like a lie detector, FAST measures a variety of physiological indicators, ranging from heart rate to the steadiness of a person’s gaze, to judge a subject’s state of mind. But there are major differences from the polygraph. FAST relies on non-contact sensors, so it can measure indicators as someone walks through a corridor at an airport, and it does not depend on active questioning of the subject.

  • Human organs could be grown inside pigs for use in transplant operations following research using stem cells.
  • TEPCO was able to control information through the age-old system of Press Clubs, where the government provides information to selected media.

    But The Mail on Sunday spoke to sources inside the Japanese nuclear industry who knew that radiation readings spiked 155 miles south of Fukushima, immediately after the first explosion. They were told by officials to keep the findings quiet.

    A survey by Fuji Television Network last month found that 81 per cent of the public no longer trusts any government information about radiation.

  • Despite reports that it was a war with the loose online collective Anonymous, today hacker group LulzSec has announced it is to team up with the online community to begin “Operation Anti-Security”, a declaration which will see it attack any government or agency that “crosses their path”.

    LulzSec, famous for compromising the servers of Fox, Sony, the CIA, PBS and a number of other websites, announced its plans in its usual fashion, posting a release to Pastebin and then tweeting the link from its 217,000 strong Twitter account.

    As part of the campaign, LulzSec encourages attackers to compromise government websites and flaunt the word “AntiSec”, prompting interested parties to consider tagging buildings with the same phrase with physical graffiti art. Uniting all that wish to join them, the hacker group wants acts of corruption exposed, all in the name of Anti-Security.

  • Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), which runs the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, started Sunday to pour water into a pool on the top floor of reactor 4 of the six-reactor plant after it discovered the water level had dropped to about one-third of its capacity, public broadcaster NHK reported.

    The drop caused equipment in the pool to be exposed, releasing high levels of radiation, officials said.

    The radiation levels at reactor 4 have been preventing workers from entering the structure to conduct repairs.

    TEPCO also began late Sunday to release air containing radioactive substances from the building of reactor 2 by opening its doors.

    An estimated 1.6 billion becquerels of radioactive materials were released, compared with 500 million becquerels when the double doors of the building of reactor 1 were opened in May, the Jiji Press agency reported, citing TEPCO.

    The operator denied that the releases would have an impact on the environment.

  • Today the National Association of the Deaf, the nation’s premier civil rights organization of deaf and hard of hearing individuals, filed a lawsuit against Netflix, charging that the entertainment company violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by failing to provide closed captioning for most of its “Watch Instantly” movies and television shows that are streamed over the internet. An estimated 36 million Americans are deaf or hard of hearing and, as noted in a press release about the lawsuit, many had repeatedly appealed to Netflix via letters, petitions and social media tools.
  • We now know that Nato is using Twitter as a source of intelligence. We know that people are posting coordinates of potential targets to Nato.

    But we do not know how Nato uses Twitter. Are there accounts out there covertly operated by intelligence officials under pseudonyms, engaging with tweeters?

    Are you aware of accounts which may be being used by Nato to gather intelligence from Libya? Do you have examples of tweeters posting coordinates of locations which are then targeted by Nato air strikes?

  • President Obama is expected to announcewithin a week if and how many combat troops he plans to withdraw from the war in Afghanistan. Some of those who will be most impacted by the decision are U.S. soldiers and their families and Afghans who have been dealing with the ramifications of the war for nearly a decade.

    Yet the war is affecting more than just Western soldiers and their families and Afghan citizens. It has become a costly drain on our nation’s treasury; the money that is being spent on the war represents resources that are being drained away from important domestic priorities in a nation with sky-high unemployment and crumbling infrastructure.

  • “When I stubbed my toe, it felt like someone slammed it with a hammer,” says Shawn, still shaken by the recollection.

    At first he thought the problem was “all in his head” and he could “tough it out.” But after several days, when the pain had not diminished, he went to his doctor. The diagnosis—opioid-induced hyperalgesia—was so bizarre that it might have been lifted from the plot of a horror movie. The painkillers had not merely lost their effect—they had triggered a syndrome of hypersensitivity to pain, even to stimuli that previously had not registered as painful.

    Opiate-induced hyperalgesia is what doctors call “a paradoxical phenomenon,” a drug having the reverse effect than intended. After decades of heroin abuse topped off by a medical course of OxyContin and other prescription opiates for pain, the accumulated damage caused certain receptors in Shawn’s central nervous system leading to certain pathways in his brain pathways to hit critical mass. His pain wiring went haywire.

  • Years of weak regulation, a lack of legislation and no prescription-drug-monitoring program — combined with doctors who liberally prescribe narcotics — helped make Florida the poster child for the prescription-drug epidemic.

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Fuck A LOLCat, Gimme RIOT DOG!

  • “This research shows that the brain activation is able to predict what music is going to become popular two or three years from now,” said Stanford University marketing professor Baba Shiv, who studies decision-making but wasn’t involved in the project. “We have to wake up to the notion that these instinctual brain functions can have predictive value.”
  • A Battle Creek woman is asking authorities to file assault charges against her husband’s ex-wife for sending him a letter smeared with peanut butter.

    According to police, the woman said she is highly allergic to peanuts and that she believed putting peanut butter on a bill sent to her husband was an attempt to harm her.

  • Robert Sayegh was on a Delta Airlines carrier flight home from his cousin’s wedding in Kansas City when he said a flight attendant overheard him complaining about a 45-minute delay to a fellow passenger.

    “It’s ridiculous and embarrassing,” the television producer and children’s book author said this morning from his home in Brooklyn. “I was just kind of talking to the guy sitting next to me. I said ‘What is taking so long?’ I said “What the ‘F’ is going on?’ ” Sayegh said. “I could see if I directed it at (the flight attendant), but I didn’t even speak to him.”

  • “IT’S LIKE AN INSECT INFESTATION”

    In recent months hackers have broken into the SecurID tokens used by millions of people, targeting data from defense contractors Lockheed Martin, L3 and almost certainly others; launched a sophisticated strike on the International Monetary Fund; and breached digital barriers to grab account information from Sony, Google, Citigroup and a long list of others.

    The latest high-profile victims were the public websites of the CIA and the U.S. Senate – whose committees are drafting legislation to improve coordination of cyber defenses.

    Terabytes of data are flying out the door, and billions of dollars are lost in remediation costs and reputational harm, government and private security experts said in interviews. The head of the U.S. military’s Cyber Command, General Keith Alexander, has estimated that Pentagon computer systems are probed by would-be assailants 250,000 times each hour.

  • Bangkok, Thailand. Just fourteen years ago, the Sathorn Unique skyscraper was being built, destined to become one of the city’s fanciest residential addresses. Now, it is an abandoned building. Never completed, it remains as yet another “ghost tower” of Bangkok. A tangle of trees and vines are beginning to take over the lighter parts of this monolith, such as the four storey archways and romanesque feature columns. Amazingly, this building is located in the central area of one of the worlds largest cities.
  • A researcher says the death rate among babies is up 48 percent since Iodine-131 was found in Philadelphia’s drinking water

    Joseph Mangano is is the executive director of the Radiation And Public Health Project in New York, which is made of up scientists and health professionals.

    there has been a recent spike, in infant deaths in Philadelphia, and Mangano says radioactive levels, in our water could be to blame.

    After the explosion at the Fukushima power plant in Japan, radiation circled the globe, all the way to Pennsylvania.

    About a month, after the disaster, radiation levels spiked, in our water, at three Philadelphia facilities.

    Mangano said radiation combined with higher levels of iodine the EPAQ found in Philadelphia’s water two months ago may be killing young babies here.

    We’re reporting his research not to alarm or cause panic, but to inform. It’s enough time to suggest, not conclude yet. The real benefit is it is a red flag for more studies to be done.

  • For the administrator of the Portland Water Bureau, the decision Wednesday to drain 7.8 million gallons of drinking water from a Mount Tabor reservoir comes down to six words:

    “Do you want to drink pee?” David Shaff asked.

    About 1:30 a.m. Wednesday, water officials say, a 21-year-old Molalla man was caught on camera urinating in one of Portland’s uncovered reservoirs — one that provides water to a majority of Portlanders.

    From a gross-out perspective, that’s enough to make residents wary of turning on the tap.

  • According to a report this week, Facebook lost nearly 6 million users in the U.S. in May. Facebook disputes the number, and yet it’s not implausible.

    What Facebook user hasn’t thought of walking out?

    Part of the problem with Facebook is how good it is at the thing it was invented to do, which is to put you in contact with people.

    Contact with people turns out to be a mixed blessing. The more people you’re in contact with, the more people there are for you to disappoint, offend, annoy — and the other way around. Though Facebook entertains, diverts and sometimes educates, it also multiplies all the problems that come with relationships.

    But that’s an old lament about Facebook. So is the sad truth that Facebook drains time that would be more productively used, say, practicing the mandolin.

    The newer problem is that Facebook has come to feel like a stalker. Not only does it do kinky things with your personal data, its little blue F box is more intrusive and insistent every day.

  • The study found that today’s average new cable high-definition digital video recorders (HD-DVR) use more than half the energy of an average new refrigerator and more than an average new flat panel TV. Two-thirds of their total energy consumption – the equivalent annual energy output of six coal-burning power plants – occurs when they’re not in use.
  • In the Smithsonian Institution is a sixteenth-century automaton of a monk, made of wood and iron, 15 inches in height. Driven by a key-wound spring, the monk walks in a square, striking his chest with his right arm, raising and lowering a small wooden cross and rosary in his left hand, turning and nodding his head, rolling his eyes, and mouthing silent obsequies. From time to time, he brings the cross to his lips and kisses it. After over 400 years, he remains in good working order.
  • In the early years of the Iraq war, the U.S. military developed a technology so secret that soldiers would refuse to acknowledge its existence, and reporters mentioning the gear were promptly escorted out of the country. That equipment – a radio-frequency jammer – was upgraded several times, and eventually robbed the Iraq insurgency of its most potent weapon, the remote-controlled bomb. But the dark veil surrounding the jammers remained largely intact, even after the Pentagon bought more than 50,000 units at a cost of over $17 billion.
  • Robert Adams at first thought someone was playing a trick when he saw the plastic bag filled with money lying next to a news box in a suburban strip mall.

    Adams told WGN-AM’s Greg Jarrett this morning that the bag sitting outside the Chase Bank branch in Rolling Meadow where he was headed late Monday afternoon to get some cash to buy a lunchtime burrito was filled with lots of bills–a little more than $17,000, as police later determined.

  • Human scum! At the entrance to Kengkou market, a person is roasting a live puppy!
  • Despite the corporate-driven hubbub surrounding the inevitability of “the cloud” replacing personal hard drives as the pre-eminent storage center for all web content, this system represents another dangerous trojan horse for the establishment to complete their agenda to regulate and shut down the free Internet.

    Apple, Google and Amazon amongst other tech giants have all jumped on board with “the cloud,” a remote server network that allows users to store their data without using hard drives.

    “It’s all part of a generational trend away from owning physical media content and towards renting media content from the computing universal cloud,” reports Investmentu.com.

    However, despite the convenience of having all your files easily accessible in one place wherever you go, the drawbacks are ominous.

  • Last July, the defendant asked the victim to wait for him early in morning at a Netanya intersection. He picked her up in his car and drove her to the beach. There he told her that she is fated “to become the messiah’s mother,” and that she must “atone for all the bad deeds that she has done so far” by having sexual relations with him.

    He then conducted a marriage ceremony with the girl while still in the car, and swore her to secrecy. At one point he asked her to take her clothes off, and assaulted her.

  • Three young women escaped a sinking SUV after a direction from a rental car GPS unit sent them down a boat launch and into the Mercer Slough early Wednesday.

    The driver apparently thought she was on a road while following her GPS unit just after midnight, but she was actually heading down the Sweyolocken boat launch.

  • It might be the ‘Land of the Free’, but some states certainly aren’t living up to the words of America’s national anthem.

    New York, New Jersey and California are the least free in the U.S., based on an index of public policies affecting your individual freedoms.

    The rankings are based economic, social and personal freedoms of Americans – and include measures such as taxes, government spending and regulations.

  • Heat, drugs and alcohol can be a deadly combination at large summer music festivals like the Bonnaroo Festival Music & Arts that just wrapped in Manchester, Tenn., where a second death was reported Tuesday. Entertainment Weekly reports that a 24-year-old man died from hyperthermia, a condition that occurs when the body gets too hot and can’t cool itself. Temperatures at the festival were in the 90s, and large crowds of sweaty bodies probably didn’t help the situation.

    A few days ago a 32-year-old woman was found dead at the festival’s camp grounds, but the cause of death is not known. In 2004 two men also died at Bonnaroo, which was then three years old, and were the first deaths to occur at that festival.

    Bonnaroo isn’t the only outsize concert to have suffered casualties: In 2008, a 21-year-old man died of a drug overdose at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, and in 2010 at least 19 people were killed in a stampede at the Love Parade festival in Germany.

  • A man “marries” a mannequin and wheels her on a walking tour of upstate New York.
  • The elderly are killed. Young women are raped. And able-bodied men are given hammers, machetes and sticks and forced to fight to the death.

    In one of the most chilling revelations yet about the violence in Mexico, a drug cartel-connected trafficker claims fellow gangsters have kidnapped highway bus passengers and forced them into gladiatorlike fights to groom fresh assassins.

  • Basement full of evil radioactive yellow water
  • A 12-year-old boy died after eating cookies poisoned by two girls at his school in northeastern Brazil, police told AFP Tuesday.

    The girls, aged 13 and 14, admitted putting a deadly dose of rat poison in the cookies, but claimed they were meant for two rival girls at their school on the outskirts of the city of Recife, the investigating officer, Mariana Villas Boas, said.

    The boy, who was called to deliver the toxic cookies for them to allay suspicions, was not aware of the plan and ate them instead, with deadly result. He was taken to hospital in agony and died shortly afterwards.

    “The boy died last Thursday after eating the poisoned biscuits,” Villas Boas said.

  • Japanese scientist making artificial meat from human feces.

    Sh*t Steaks And Turd Burgers – Now that’s what you call the ORGANIC part of a Green movement -ha

    He says the biggest hurdle is the psychological barrier.
    you have to be shitting me!

  • Two men have been arrested in connection with a murder plot involving British singer Joss Stone. They were taken into custody in Devon, England, near Stone’s home, police have confirmed to BBC News.

    The two unidentified men, ages 30 and 33, were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to murder and rob the star. They were apprehended on Monday after a suspicious vehicle was seen in the Cullompton area and were initially arrested on “possession of offensive weapons and being equipped to steal.”

    Once arrested, they were reportedly found in possession of swords, forensic-style overalls, plans of Stone’s house and a body bag. Police added that the singer is aware of the arrests, although it is not known if she was home at the time they were made.

  • Are you prepared to be yet again disappointed in and freaked out by the incompetence of TSA agents? Chicagoan Paul Kahan, a James Beard award winning chef and partner at the awesome restaurants Avec, Blackbird, Big Star and The Publican, managed to slip four of his massive chef knives through security at Chicago-O’Hare Airport. What happened then? Well, he took his flight like normal with four giant knives at easy reach.
  • “Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind,” Arnold Gundersen, a former nuclear industry senior vice president, told Al Jazeera.
  • Rich Lam shot an amazing photo of a couple making out in the middle of one of the riots last night in Vancover after the Canucks lost in game seven of the Stanley Cup Finals.
  • This spirited dog has been participating in Greek riots since 2008. Everything you see is real and unaltered.
  • So it was doubly delicious to see Shepard Fairey flunk his first ordeal with the paparazzi, this bane of celebrity. After a decade of having his corporate brand enter our public space in the guise of a rebellious act, TMZ flaunted the liberty of public space exactly like Shepard Fairey has with glued up OBEY signage. The tables were turned and now instead of us, the public, forced to endure Fairey’s flaunting of the social contract with unwanted street art, it was the street art legend forced to endure scrutiny in a public space for our entertainment.
  • IPHONE users may soon be stopped from filming at concerts — as a result of new Apple technology.

    The leading computer company plans to build a system that will sense when people are trying to video live events — and turn off their cameras.

    A patent application filed by Apple revealed how the technology would work.

    If an iPhone were held up and used to film during a concert infra-red sensors would detect it.

    These sensors would then contact the iPhone and automatically disable its camera function.

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File under Music, Secret History, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on June 17, 2011

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Jesus Jeans

  • When the call of nature comes, it cannot always be denied. Few have answered it in such an unfortunate fashion as Alois Mabhunu.

    While on duty at a trade fair, the Zimbabwean police sergeant could not hold on and allegedly dashed to the nearest toilet – disastrously, it transpired, as it was reserved for President Robert Mugabe.

    He was arrested and imprisoned on suspicion of invading the presidential privy.

  • Former Kiss guitarist Vinnie Vincent was arrested in his current home of Tennessee Saturday on assault charges after his wife Diane reported to police an incident wherein the Lick It Up shredder hit her, threw her to the ground, and dragged her through broken glass. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the Rutherford County officers dispatched to Vincent’s home immediately thereafter found “four sealed containers containing deceased dogs” that had apparently been killed by one of Vinnie’s other more “aggressive” dogs. We think we speak for the entire global heavy metal community when we ask what in the name of Paul Fucking Stanley is going on in Vinnie Vincent’s life in 2011?
  • Perry made two trips to rehab for addiction to alcohol and prescription painkillers during the 10-year run of “Friends” , on which he played wise-cracking Chandler Bing.
  • The sequel to ‘The Human Centipede’ has been refused a UK cinema release.

    The imaginatively titled ‘The Human Centipede II’ was rejected by the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) on the basis that it is “sexually violent and potentially obscene”.

  • From 1993 to 2008, the Drugs Information Monitoring System (DIMS) in The Netherlands gathered and analyzed tablets of purported MDMA sold on the street as Ecstasy. In a research report published in Addiction, Neeltje Vogels and others at the Netherlands Institute for Mental Health and Addiction in Utrecht found that between 70 to 90 % of the samples submitted as MDMA were pure. The most common non-MDMA adulterant was found to be caffeine.

    The Dutch study obtained samples for testing from capsules seized by club owners and given to the police, who then passed them on to DIMS for analysis. This system helped eliminate the possible bias effect of voluntary submissions. In the mid to late 1990s, researchers saw an increase in samples contaminated with ephedra and methamphetamine, and sample purity hit an all-time low of 60% in 1997. The years from 2000 to 2004 were the golden era, so to speak, for MDMA purity.

  • Florida Department of Transportation cameras capture people using various methods to avoid paying tolls and fines.
  • The underground world of computer hackers has been so thoroughly infiltrated in the US by the FBI and secret service that it is now riddled with paranoia and mistrust, with an estimated one in four hackers secretly informing on their peers, a Guardian investigation has established.
  • It’s a phenomenon that’s rarely discussed in the art world: The new work on a gallery wall wasn’t necessarily painted by the artist who signed it. Some well-known artists, such as Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons, openly employ small armies of assistants to do their paintings and sculptures. Others hire help more quietly.

    Art-market insiders say soaring prices and demand for contemporary art is spurring the use of apprentices by more artists. The art world is divided on the practice: While some collectors and dealers put a premium on paintings and sculptures executed by an artist’s own hand, others say that assistants are a necessity in the contemporary market.

  • When most people think about the effect of counterfeits on legitimate brands—and when brands themselves litigate against counterfeiters—they focus on the “business stealing” effect: Every fake Prada handbag represents a lost sale for Prada. But a dirty little secret is that Prada rip-offs can also function as free advertising for real Prada handbags—partly by signaling the brand’s popularity, but, less obviously, by creating what MIT marketing professor Renee Richardson Gosline has described as a “gateway” product. For her doctoral thesis, Gosline immersed herself in the counterfeit “purse parties” of upper-middle-class moms. She found that her subjects formed attachments to their phony Vuittons and came to crave the real thing when, inevitably, they found the stitches falling apart on their cheap knockoffs. Within a couple of years, more than half of the women—many of whom had never fancied themselves consumers of $1,300 purses—abandoned their counterfeits for authentic items.
  • British intelligence has hacked into an al-Qaeda online magazine and replaced bomb-making instructions with a recipe for cupcakes.
  • Next time you go on vacation, you may want to think twice before shooting hundreds of photos of that scenic mountain or lake.

    A new study from MIT neuroscientists shows that the most memorable photos are those that contain people, followed by static indoor scenes and human-scale objects. Landscapes? They may be beautiful, but they are, in most cases, utterly forgettable.

  • A modern epidemic now threatens Phiyer and no amount of ancient voodoo will protect it. The village lies in the mountainous Sing district, which shares its northern border — and the mighty Mekong River — with Burma. There, in semiautonomous fiefdoms ruled by heavily armed militias, secret factories spew out hundreds of millions of tablets of methamphetamine, a highly addictive drug better known there by its Thai name yaba (crazy medicine). From Burma, the drug is spirited across the ill-policed Mekong into Laos and its four other neighbors — China, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia — and onward to other parts of Asia and as far afield as New Zealand. Sleepy Phiyer sits on one of Asia’s — and the world’s — busiest drug-trafficking routes.
  • The melted fuel at Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station may have leaked through the pressure vessels of the Nos. 1 to 3 reactors, the Yomiuri newspaper reported.

    The Japanese government will submit a report to the International Atomic Energy Agency that raises the possibility the fuel dropped through the bottom of the pressure vessels, a situation described as a “melt through” and considered more serious than a “meltdown,” according to the report, which cited the document.

  • This time, his primary vendetta is against the online black market site Silk Road — but he has plenty of ire to spare for the encrypted e-currency Bitcoin as well, for facilitating such anonymous transactions. Silk Road — whose URL (http://ianxz6zefk72ulzz.onion/index.php) is accessible only through the Tor anonymizer — became a center of media attention after a story at Gawker.com on June 1 revealed that the anonymous marketplace hosts such goods for sale as hashish, weed, ecstasy, heroin and LSD.

    Silk Road is a classic example of the kinds of rating and reputational mechanisms that emerge in a free market, absent the regulatory state. Although sellers’ real identities are unknown, their history of quality and reliability is tracked on the same user feedback model as Amazon and Ebay.

  • Most of us never considered eating the mud pies we made as kids, but for many people all over the world, dining on dirt is nothing out of the ordinary. Now an extensive meta-analysis forthcoming in the June issue of The Quarterly Review of Biology helps explain why. According to the research, the most probable explanation for human geophagy—the eating of earth—is that it protects the stomach against toxins, parasites, and pathogens.
  • It’s hard to imagine a Senator making a blunter statement than Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) made in the heat of the Patriot Act reauthorization fight last month: “When the American people find out how their government has secretly interpreted the Patriot Act,” he said, “they will be stunned and they will be angry.” Wyden is in a position to know. As a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, he receives classified briefings from the executive branch. And in recent years, three other current and former members of the Senate—Mark Udall (D-CO), Dick Durbin (D-IL), and Russ Feingold (D-WI)—have made similar comments.
  • The warning of Theodore Roosevelt has much timeliness today, for the real menace of our republic is this invisible government which like a giant octopus sprawls its slimy length over City, State, and nation. It seizes in its long and powerful tentacles our executive officers, our legislative bodies, our schools, our courts, our newspapers, and every agency created for the public protection. To depart from mere generalisations, let me say that at the head of this octopus are….a small group of powerful banking houses generally referred to as the international bankers. The little coterie of powerful international bankers virtually run the United States government for their own selfish purposes.
  • Even as the veggie blame game is now under way across the EU, where a super resistant strain of e.coli is sickening patients and filling hospitals in Germany, virtually no one is talking about how e.coli could have magically become resistant to eight different classes of antibiotic drugs and then suddenly appeared in the food supply.

    This particular e.coli variation is a member of the O104 strain, and O104 strains are almost never (normally) resistant to antibiotics. In order for them to acquire this resistance, they must be repeatedly exposed to antibiotics in order to provide the “mutation pressure” that nudges them toward complete drug immunity.

  • David Martines was scanning Google Mars when he discovered the long white edifice and has even listed the coordinates (49’19.73″N 29 33’06.53″W) so others can see it for themselves.

    Mr Martines posted a video of the ‘station’ on YouTube which has been viewed more than 200,000 times.

    On the video, he talks through the discovery he has named “Bio-Station Alpha”. “It’s very unusual in that it’s quite large, it’s over 700 feet (210m) long and 150 feet (45m) wide. It looks like it’s a cylinder or made up of cylinders,” he says.

    “It could be a power station or it could be a biological containment or it could be a glorified garage — hope it’s not a weapon.

  • Drugs Live, a four-part science series, will look at the effect of illegal drugs and alcohol on the body.

    Announcing a raft of new programmes, Jay Hunt, Channel 4’s chief creative officer, said the future for the broadcaster lay in taking ”real risks”.

    She said: ”When you look across the broadcast landscape, when other broadcasters are more conservative, it’s never been more important for Channel 4 to stimulate debate, to challenge the status quo, and above all to be brave.”

    Introducing the Drugs Live project, she said: ”The Government’s drugs tsar Professor (David) Nutt was sacked for claiming that LSD and ecstasy were less harmful than alcohol.

    ”In an incredibly bold experiment we are going to be putting that to the test live, looking at the impact all of those substances have on the human body in a clinical environment.”

  • Insp Moray Watt said: “Police officers, working closely with door staff at the premises, will select people for checking as a condition of entry.

    “Those who test positive will be refused entry by door staff and potentially searched by police officers for any drugs they have on their person.”

    He commended the owners of the pubs taking part in the operation for “taking such a responsible and realistic approach that acknowledges the possibility that controlled drugs may enter their premises”.

  • A trial date is expected to be set on Thursday for 12 people arrested in connection with setting a pastor alight after accusing him of using a magic penis to sleep with women.
  • Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant experienced full meltdowns at three reactors in the wake of an earthquake and tsunami in March, the country’s Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters said Monday.

    The nuclear group’s new evaluation, released Monday, goes further than previous statements in describing the extent of the damage caused by an earthquake and tsunami on March 11.

    The announcement will not change plans for how to stabilize the Fukushima Daiichi plant, the agency said.

    Reactors 1, 2 and 3 experienced a full meltdown, it said.

  • The makers of Silver Bullet Gun Oil claim it contains 13 per cent USDA liquefied pig fat thus making the product ‘a highly effective counter-Islamic terrorist force multiplier.’

    The apparent owner of the gun oil site, who goes by the name ‘The Midnight Rider,’ explains how the pig fat will transfer onto anything the bullet strikes.

    This ‘effectively denies entry to Allah’s paradise to an Islamo-fascist terrorist,’ Rider adds.

  • On September 24, the four, along with Elroy’s girlfriend Sherry Brown, began a night of drinking. At some point, Willie and Betty bought fried chicken with Elroy’s money, who later became upset when Willie decided to eat the remaining chicken.

    At 3 a.m. Elroy woke his sleeping brother and informed him that he was going to kill him, Willie and Betty. Forcing all three to sit on the couch, Elroy grabbed a hunting knife and stabbed Betty, severing her spinal cord. He then stabbed Willie nine times. Meanwhile, Sherry (Elroy’s girlfriend) cowered in a corner and Ervin (Elroy’s brother) begged Elroy not to kill him. After Willie died, Elroy dipped some of the chicken in his blood and ate it.

  • THIS shocking photo is said to show a giant rat of the type being blamed for a series of attacks on children.

    The monster rodents as big as cats are believed to have killed two babies in South Africa’s squalid townships.

    The giant rats grow up to three-foot including their tails – and have front teeth over an INCH long.

    Three-year-old Lunathi Dwadwa was killed as she slept in her parent’s shack in a slum outside Cape Town this week.

    Another baby girl died in a similar rat attack, on the same day, but this time in the Soweto township near Johannesburg.

  • A group calling itself the .Wav Collective, after a Windows audio file format, has posted a video showing a pair of street artists disguised as workmen cordoning off a section of the Jungfernstieg in downtown Hamburg Friday morning, hoisting a ladder against the construction barricade at the site of Apple’s (AAPL) newest retail in the city, and calmly affixing an oversize (and slightly jumbled) Windows logo.
    Thanks Naw
  • Police arrested more than a dozen people after fights involving about 50 youths broke out around 7 o’clock Monday night at Ontario Beach Park. Police had to clear the area, sending people home.

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on June 7, 2011

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Wet White Pussy Swallows It Whole

  • Substantial damage to the fuel cores at two additional reactors of Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex has taken place, operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Sunday, further complicating the already daunting task of bringing them to a safe shutdown while avoiding the release of high levels of radioactivity. The revelation followed an acknowledgment on Thursday that a similar meltdown of the core took place at unit No. 1.
  • The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary collections of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation and other contributing libraries and archives.
  • A Queens pol who has championed anti-graffiti laws wants to crack down on “fat caps,” a device he says vandals put on spray-paint cans to tag wider areas in less time.

    Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. said he will introduce legislation this month to ban sales of fat caps to anyone under 21 and require older patrons to show ID.

    He previously helped pass laws that restrict the sale of spray-paint cans and broad-tipped markers. He has also sponsored a bill restricting the sale of etching acid.

  • A British grandmother begged for help moments before being decapitated by a stranger who allegedly paraded her head through a popular Spanish resort town declaring “this is my treasure”.
  • A new craze sweeping the Internet known as “planking” claimed a life in Australia Sunday and police fear the tragedy may not be the last.

    Planking involves someone lying flat on their stomach with their arms against their bodies in unusual and sometimes dangerous situations, with photographs of their exploits shared through social media sites.

    It has gone viral in recent weeks with the Facebook page Planking Australia boasting over 55,000 fans and hundreds of photos of people lying on train tracks, escalators, fire hydrants, motorbikes and other objects.

  • Ana Catarian Bezerra is a 36-year-old Brazilian woman who suffers from a chemical imbalance that triggers severe anxiety and hypersexuality. Ana, an accountant by day, began to have problems at work because the only way to relieve said anxiety is by masturbating. A lot. Now, after winning a court battle and seeking professional medical help, Ana is allowed to masturbate and watch porn — using her work’s computer, no less — legally.
  • Maggie Rodriguez spoke to 8-year-old Mikey Hicks and his mother Nahjlah about sharing a name with a suspected terrorist on a government watch list and how he’s treated by airport security.
  • David Phillips, a civil engineer at UC-Davis, has become a cult hero in the obsessive subculture of people who collect frequent-flier miles by converting $3,150 worth of pudding into 1.2 million miles. Oh, yeah – he’s also going to claim an $815 tax write-off.

    Last May, Phillips was pushing his shopping cart down the frozen-food aisle of his local supermarket when a promotion on a Healthy Choice frozen entree caught his eye: He could earn 500 miles for every 10 Universal Product Codes (bar codes) from Healthy Choice products he sent to the company by Dec 31. Even better: Any Healthy Choice bar codes mailed by the end of the month would rack up double the mileage, or 1,000 miles for every 10 labels.

  • A short film about my favorite post-apocalyptic hell-hole, the Salton Sea.
  • The UK’s “outdated” drug laws could be doing more harm than good and are failing to recognise that banning some “legal highs” may have negative consequences for public health, according to the leading independent panel set up to analyse drugs policy.

    On the eve of the 40th anniversary of the Misuse of Drugs Act, the UK Drug Policy Commission warns that the exponential rise in “legal highs” and the availability of substances over the internet is making current laws redundant.

  • One of the most exciting pieces of news to emerge from Cannes this week was the announcement of Jodorowsky’s Dune, a documentary about the failed attempt by ambitious and very possibly insane Chilean filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky to film Frank Herbert‘s novel Dune in the mid-’70s. The project has long stood as one of the great ‘films that never were.’ Just the idea of seeing the surviving participants talk about what the film might have been is exciting, and that’s what the doc offers — hopefully we’ll also see art and designs that have not previously been released.

    So here’s the first promo video for the film, in which Alejandro Jodorowsky explains just how ambitious his plan for the movie really was.

  • There is no facile synthesis of the events that transpired at the Wamego missile silo between October 1 and November 4, 2000. The available information is a viscous solution of truths, half-lies, three-quarter truths, and outright lies, the fractionation of which yields no pure product. The dramatis personae are many and varied. The chemicals in question often obscure and untested. What is known is that in 1997, a virtuosic organic chemist named Leonard Pickard joined forces with Gordon Todd Skinner, the heir to a spring-manufacturing fortune, to organize what would later become the world’s most productive LSD laboratory. A laboratory that, according to some sources, produced 90 percent of the LSD in circulation, in addition to unknown quantities of MDMA, ALD-52, ergot wine, and quite possibly LSZ… but I’ll get to that later.
  • Robert Fitzpatrick is so convinced the end is near he’s betting his life savings on it.

    The retired MTA employee has pumped $140,000 into a NYC Transit ad campaign to warn everyone the world will end next Saturday.

    “Global Earthquake! The Greatest Ever – Judgment Day: May 21,” the ad declares above a placid picture of night over Jerusalem with a clock that’s about to strike midnight.

    “I’m trying to warn people about what’s coming,” the 60-year-old Staten Island resident said. “People who have an understanding [of end times] have an obligation to warn everyone.”

    His doomsday warning has appeared on 1,000 placards on subway cars, at a cost of $90,000, and at bus shelters around the city, for $50,000 more.
    Fitzpatrick’s millenial mania began after he retired in 2006 and began listening to California evangelist Harold Camping’s “end of days” predictions.

    Thanks Nico

  • The magazine instilled in me a habit of mind, a way of thinking about a world rife with false fronts, small print, deceptive ads, booby traps, treacherous language, double standards, half truths, subliminal pitches and product placements; it warned me that I was often merely the target of people who claimed to be my friend; it prompted me to mistrust authority, to read between the lines, to take nothing at face value, to see patterns in the often shoddy construction of movies and TV shows; and it got me to think critically in a way that few actual humans charged with my care ever bothered to.

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File under Culture, Graffiti, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

☢~ Meltdown ~☢

  • San Francisco mother injects daughter with Botox for purely cosmetic reasons.
  • Saiwai-ku Kawasaki is south of Tokyo where the radiation measurements were taken on May 10th 2011. If radiation levels can reach measurements this high here what are people living just outside the exclusion zone such as in Fukushima city being exposed to?

    As usual absolutely no information from TEPCO or the Japanese government has been forthcoming. Just recently the Japanese government released SPEEDI computer system radiation projections 2 months after the nuclear disaster. Their reasoning for the delay was preventing panic and maintaining order was more important than notifying residents on the potential risks of staying where they

  • When you think of mind control, you know you dream of having furry cat ears of your own that you can control with your brainwaves. And why not? They’re adorable. They’re also the latest fashion in Japan.

    The ears, created by a company called Neurowear, sit on top of a headband which incorporates sensors for brainwave reading. The ears spring to attention when you focus intently, and fold down when you relax your thoughts. Neurowear designed them to act like a natural body part.

  • It may not be a shiny gold inverted-V that clips to your shirt (or if you’re Ferengi, inside one of your capacious earlobes) but a new underwater translator could soon allow divers to make sense of dolphin sounds, and here’s the shocker: even speak back in crude dolphin-ese.

    Science fiction often obsesses over how we’d chat with aliens, but we take for granted the fact that we can’t even comment about the weather to our fellow nonhuman Planet Earth-ers. Sure, we can teach a few words or tricks, and there’s certainly the body language angle—when my dog paws at the door, I know he’s not commenting on the off-white paint job or contemporary architecture—but as two-way head-to-heads go, it’s pretty much a one-way street.

  • You’ve heard the grim timelines: if warming continues, the Great Barrier Reef will be bleached by 2030; glaciers in the Swiss Alps, on Mt. Kilimanjaro, and in Glacier National Park will disappear in under 40 years; and Arctic ice melt will leave the North Pole bare and polar bears extinct.

    The immediacy of these timelines prompts flocks of curious eco-tourists to travel to environmentally fragile areas.

    Tourism is both bane and boon: it can add strain to already distressed areas, but it can also provide income, which in turn can help preserve these wonders.

  • Then at about 9:30 p.m. Luenser caught an amazing light show on the ground as power transformers began to explode. One by one the transformers lit-up in an unbelievable chain reaction that lasted about thirty minutes.

    “It was definitely a right-place, right-time kind of moment” said Luenser as the sky glowed a brilliant blue, red and orange from the electrical flashes. “It looked like World War Three was going on below.”

  • Facebook used to have an implicit promise with its users. Basically the deal was what goes on Facebook stays on Facebook. But over the past couple of years Facebook has chosen to alter the deal. Certain profile information became available outside of Facebook, easily searchable via Google and other means. (Users can opt out of showing this but relatively few do.) Some of that profile information includes a few of the people on the user’s friend list. By repeatedly pinging public profiles, it’s possible for Google or anyone else to figure out pretty much all your friends.
  • One of the reactors at Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant has a hole in its main vessel following a meltdown of fuel rods, leading to a leakage of radioactive water, its operator said on Thursday.
  • Tokyo Electric Power Company says the No.1 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is believed to be in a state of “meltdown”.

    The utility company said on Thursday that most of the fuel rods are likely to have melted and fallen to the bottom of the reactor. Earlier in the day, it found that the coolant water in the reactor is at a level which would completely expose nuclear fuel rods if they were in their normal position.

    The company believes the melted fuel has cooled down, judging from the reactor’s surface temperature.

    But it suspects the meltdown created a hole or holes in the bottom of the reactor causing water to leak into the containment vessel.

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Mmmmmmmotorboat!

  • Zambada Niebla’s allegation of U.S. government complicity in his narco-trafficking activities is laid out in a two-page court pleading filed in late March with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois in Chicago. The pleading asserts that Zambada Niebla was working with “public authority” “on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration (“DEA”); and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”); and the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”).
  • Executive Summary: Two members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff ‘dis America’s hyper-aggressive imperialism … Newly-leaked documents show that innocent people were thrown into Gitmo because they wore Casio watches or were Al Jazeera reporters … Al Qaeda assassin worked for MI6 … And – yes – the Iraq war was for oil.
  • New European Union rules have come into force banning hundreds of traditional herbal remedies.

    The EU law aims to protect consumers from possible damaging side-effects of over-the-counter herbal medicines.

  • Opponents say that many factors, besides soft drinks, contribute to obesity. Moreover, they say, imposing restrictions on food stamps would require retailers to reprogram computers and embarrass some customers at the checkout counter.
    While the American Beverage Association has led the opposition, the fight demonstrates how various parts of the food industry have united to thwart the mayor’s proposal. Beverage industry lobbyists have worked with the Snack Food Association, the National Confectioners Association, which represents candy companies, the Food Marketing Institute, which represents 26,000 retail food stores, as well as antihunger groups like the Food Research and Action Center and Feeding America.
    Eighteen members of the Congressional Black Caucus recently urged the Obama administration to reject New York’s proposal. The plan is unfair to food stamp recipients because it treats them differently from other customers, they said in a letter to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.
  • The government has set 20-millisievert limit for radiation exposure as safe, but according to Kosako, that is 20 times too high, especially for children, who are considered more vulnerable to radiation than adults.

    Plant workers are now allowed to be exposed to 250 millisieverts of radiation over a five-year period, up from 100 millisieverts.

    Tokyo Electric Power Co., the utility that runs Fukushima Daiichi, revealed Saturday that the radiation exposures for two workers have been found to have reached the limit of 250 millisieverts.

  • Come Monday, AT&T will begin restricting more than 16 million broadband users based on the amount of data they use in a month. The No. 2 carrier’s entry into the broadband-cap club means that a majority of U.S. broadband users will now be subject to limits on how much they can do online or risk extra charges as ugly as video store late fees.

    AT&T’s new limits — 150 GB for DSL subscribers and 250 GB for UVerse users (a mix of fiber and DSL) — come as users are increasingly turning to online video such as Hulu and Netflix on-demand streaming service instead of paying for cable.

    With the change, AT&T joins Comcast and numerous small ISPs in putting a price on a fixed amount of internet usage. It’s a complete abandonment of the unlimited plans which turned the internet into a global behemoth after the slow-growth dial-up days, when customers were charged by the minute and thus accessed the internet as sparingly as possible.

  • STAFF at a hospital were astounded to discover €60,000 in cash carefully wrapped around a male patient’s upper body.

    The elderly man informed medical personnel treating him that he was terrified to leave his life savings at home in case he was robbed — and was equally afraid to lodge the money in a bank because of the current financial crisis.

  • Police were called to the Middleton family’s local pub when a woman was punched in the face after being racially abused at a party attended by wedding guests.

    Ugly scenes unfolded in the beer garden after a man objected to an Asian woman and her friends sitting in some seats which he claimed had been taken by his friends.

  • In an otherwise quiet article on central banks today, Bloomberg quoted an analyst who says China may use up to a third of their $3 trillion in foreign reserves to purchase gold.

    China has been moving away from the dollar, and into alternative stores of wealth for years now.

    But $1 trillion in gold? If it plays out, such a move would further threaten the dollar’s status as reserve currency. It would provide further buying pressure in gold for years to come, as the dollar crumples into a pitiful heap on the floor.

  • Beleaguered social networking site MySpace may have a new owner by the end of the week. The Wall Street Journal has reported that News. Corp is seeking $100 million for MySpace. The sale is expected to attract bids from a variety investment firms and companies who may seek the buy parts or the whole of MySpace.

    News. Corp paid $580 million for MySpace back in 2005. At the time, the purchase appeared to be a solid investment. But as Facebook rose to become the preferred social networking destination, users began abandoning MySpace in droves. In late 2010, after a redesign and a new focus on music and entertainment failed to reinvigorate, News. Corp suggested that it was ready to give up on the site. MySpace began drastically scaling back its workforce earlier this year, a clear sign that the site wasn’t going to be in the hands of News Corp. much longer.

  • Thanks GregNF
  • Various men in the film appear to grope her and perform a range of sex acts with her. In one scene, the actress jumps into the arms of an LA traffic officer, who spanks her and then fondles her bare breasts.

    A second traffic officer takes a few spankings from the woman, then allows her to get into his official city car, where she performs lewd acts on herself.

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