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Is Veganism Child Abuse?
alternet.org/food/veganism-…

Food companies have spent billions of dollars to cover up the link between sugar consumption and health problems
motherjones.com/blue-marble/20…

Bucket List: 12 Battered & Abandoned KFC Stores
weburbanist.com/2014/06/15/buc…

Harley-Davidson testing electric motorcycles
washingtonpost.com/national/harle…

‘Vigilante motorist’ faces fine after using mobile signal jammer to keep others off their phones
independent.co.uk/life-style/gad…

The TaTa Top
thetatatop.com

Pirate Radio Station for $55 Could Help Decentralize Big-Telecom

thedailysheeple.com/pirate-radio-s…

Man Almost Killed Girlfriend After Hallucinating Bear Attack While on MDMA
thefix.com/content/man-tr…

Look out for tainted “Hello Kitty” heroin
nj.com/ocean/index.ss…

Gimpsuited greenscreen fluffer flicks shampoo model’s hair
boingboing.net/2014/06/26/gim…

30-foot Marilyn Monroe statue trashed in Chinese dump
deathandtaxesmag.com/223431/30-foot…

SUPER BASS ORGASM: Sound System Makes Girl Orgasm! – EXTREME BASS

‘Black Friday’ chronicles the abandoned malls that are rotting across America
alternet.org/hard-times-usa…

That Toy Is Now a Drone, Says the FAA
spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/aero…

Russian Policewomen to Be Disciplined for Wearing Short Skirts
themoscowtimes.com/news/article/r…

Students Arrested For ‘Upskirting’ Teachers at Va. High School
washington.cbslocal.com/2014/06/27/stu…

China Builds Its Own Manhattan — Except It’s a Ghost Town
bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-2…

Barney Fife Meets Delta Force
Hypermilitarized police departments are more dangerous than whatever they fight
nationalreview.com/article/381446…

NYC Subway Graffiti from the 1980’s

File under Graffiti, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Man-Made Disaster

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► Japan Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Called ‘Man-Made’
The nuclear accident at Fukushima was a preventable disaster rooted in government-industry collusion and the worst conformist conventions of Japanese culture, a parliamentary inquiry concluded on Thursday. The report, released by the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission, challenged some of the main story lines that the government and the operator of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant have put forward. Most notably, the report said the plant’s crucial cooling systems might have been damaged in the earthquake on March 11, 2011, not only in the ensuing tsunami. That caution raises doubts about the safety of all the quake-prone country’s nuclear plants just as they begin tto restart after a pause ordered in the wake of the Fukushima crisis.
► Your Sewer on Drugs
The approach is, in essence, a community drug test. By analyzing wastewater at treatment plants or at strategic spots throughout sewer systems, scientists can run extraordinarily accurate and anonymous tests on an entire population without ever asking anyone to hand over a cup of urine. (Everyone has to use the toilet, after all.) If, say, Philadelphia implements an ad campaign against methamphetamine, officials could gauge levels of the drug in the wastewater to instantly see if it’s working. Maybe San Francisco is considering building methadone clinics—does the data suggest they’re worth it? And if law enforcement wants to know whether drug busts are reducing consumption in certain neighborhoods, it could get an immediate answer.
► Vast Majority of Americans Want Meat Raised Without Antibiotics
The majority of respondents (72%) were extremely or very concerned about the overuse of antibiotics in animal feed, including the potential to create “superbugs” that are immune or resistant to antibiotics. More than 60 percent were just as concerned with the overuse of antibiotics in animal feed allowing them to be raised in unsanitary and crowded conditions for livestock, human consumption of antibiotic residue, and environmental effects due to agricultural runoff containing antibiotics.
► Legal Drug Linked to More Cannibalism than Bath Salts
Because people are familiar with alcohol’s typical users, not just psychos cherry-picked by the media, the alcohol incidents are properly viewed as extremely rare mental-health cases. Due to yellow journalism responsible bath salts users are invisible. Instead of banning bath salts for minors and objectively studying the chemicals, politicians have responded to the distorted media attention by declaring all adults who possess them criminals.
► Mainstream Economics is a Cult
Neoclassical economics is a cult which ignores reality in favor of shared myths.
► Grow Your Brain through Meditation
In the concrete physical dimension, the brains of subjects who consistently meditated for a month showed an increase in axonal density, or signaling connections, and growth of the protective fatty tissue known as myelin. On the subjective level, these changes translate to positive behavioral development and an increased sense of well-being. Deficiencies in the aforementioned brain structures are linked to many disorders including depression, ADD, dementia and schizophrenia.
► Alien Pirates, Copyrights to Reach Deep Space
Most of the material they used was copyrighted by the creators/owners and Sagan had to get copyright releases in order to assemble the original record. Subsequently, Warner Multimedia was able to obtain copyright releases for the 1992 version of “Murmurs of Earth” .. Unfortunately, the book and CDROM are no longer being published and are hard to find as a set. Some used copies still exist for sale, versions of Murmurs of Earth published before 1992 will not contain the CDROM. Used copies, are selling for quite a bit of money for information that should be public. A complete copy of the phonograph is not available on the open market and never has been. Perhaps our next interstellar probe should be sent using more open works, because first contact could be us suing the shit out of them for hearing our message.
► DEA Madness: Top DEA Agent Refuses To Admit Crack and Heroin Are Worse Than Pot
In yet another absurd series of exchanges between a DEA agent and a sitting Congressman, the top DEA agent in America refused to say that crack or heroin are worse for someones health than marijuana. The exchange, filmed during a House Judiciary Subcommittee on June 20th, took place between Colorado Democratic Rep. Jared Polis and Drug Enforcement Agency administrator Michele Leonhart.
► Allergic to Meat: ‘Lone Star Tick’ May Be Spreading Vegetarianism
A bite from the lone star tick, so-called for the white spot on its back, looks innocent enough. But University of Virginia researchers say saliva that sneaks into the tiny wound may trigger an allergic reaction to meat — agonizing enough to convert lifelong carnivores into wary vegetarians. “People will eat beef and then anywhere from three to six hours later start having a reaction; anything from hives to full-blown anaphylactic shock,” said Dr. Scott Commins, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. “And most people want to avoid having the reaction, so they try to stay away from the food that triggers it.”
► Declassified: Massive Israeli manipulation of US media exposed
Files declassified in America have revealed covert public relations and lobbying activities of Israel in the U.S. The National Archive made the documents public following a Senate investigation. They suggest Israel has been trying to shape media coverage of issues it regards as important. You can download the files from the web-site of the Institute for Research on Middle Eastern policy.
► Corporate Hip Hop, White Supremacy and Capitalism
Huge media corporations literally bought up Hip Hop in the early to mid-1990s, imposing “cookie cutter themes of senseless violence, excessive materialism, and misogyny.” Progressive voices in rap were silenced. The clear message was, “the minute you dare try to step outside of the ‘box’ and attack their power structure, you will be omitted.”
► Beer company pulls pro-public urination billboard
A beer company has yanked ads in two cities that appears to have encouraged public urination. Mexican beer brand Tecate took down billboards in Los Angeles and San Francisco after The Tens Tumblr page first spotted the billboard with an the image of a tree and the Spanish word for “bathroom”—along with the suggestion that life is easier for guys.
► Man Returned Used Enemas To CVS Regularly
Eventually, in early June, employee Dustin McDonald found it bizarre that the man — whom he recognized from previous visits — was again bringing back the same item, and decided to investigate, the Smoking Gun reported. He opened the box of enema bottles to find they were all filled with fluid. The box had apparently been re-glued to make it look like it hadn’t been opened. The curious employee then poked into other six-pack enema boxes on the shelf and discovered that ““all the enemas in each of the 3 boxes were previously used,” according to the Smoking Gun. Each of these containers was similarly re-glued shut.
► Outrage Over Mother’s Facebook Post Of Children Fighting
“Ball up your fist. It’s like she’s training her before she starts school or something. It’s sad because today’s society in the black community its really sickening that these kids are learning how to fight, get guns and stuff, and it shouldn’t be going on.”
“>► Guy gets electrocuted on 3rd rail in NYC 34th street train [Video]
MANHATTAN — A man was killed on the subway tracks in Herald Square Sunday night after falling onto the electrified third rail, authorities said. The victim, described as being in his 20s, fell on the third rail of the F train at the 34th Street-Herald Square station shortly before 10 p.m., the NYPD said. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The man may have been intoxicated at the time, though it wasn’t immediately clear how he ended up on the tracks, police added.
► ‘UFO’ at the bottom of the Baltic Sea ‘cuts off electrical equipment when divers get within 200m’
The divers exploring a ‘UFO-shaped’ object at the bottom of the Baltic Sea say their equipment stops working when they approach within 200m. Professional diver Stefan Hogerborn, part of the Ocean X team which is exploring the anomaly, said some of the team’s cameras and the team’s satellite phone would refuse to work when directly above the object, and would only work once they had sailed away. He is quoted as saying: ‘Anything electric out there – and the satellite phone as well – stopped working when we were above the object. ‘And then we got away about 200 meters and it turned on again, and when we got back over the object it didn’t work.’
► Photos Of A Massive Chinese-Built Ghost Town In Africa
There’s been a lot written about ghost towns in China. Now, state-owned China International Trust and Investment Corporation (CITIC) has built a town in Angola. And it’s fairly empty. Just outside Angola’s capital city of Luanda is Nova Cidade de Kilamba a residential development of 750 eight-story apartment buildings, a dozen schools, and more than 100 retail units, reports the BBC’s Louise Redvers.
► OraQuick At-Home H.I.V. Test Wins F.D.A. Approval
After decades of controversy, the Food and Drug Administration approved a new H.I.V. test on Tuesday that for the first time makes it possible for Americans to learn in the privacy of their homes whether they are infected. The availability of an H.I.V. test as easy to use as a home-pregnancy kit is yet another step in the normalization of a disease that was once seen as a mark of shame and a death sentence. The OraQuick test, by OraSure Technologies, uses a mouth swab and gives results in 20 to 40 minutes. A previous test sold over the counter required a user to prick a finger and mail a drop of dried blood to a lab.
► US Coast Guard creates ‘protest-free zone’ in Alaska oil drilling zone
The United States Coast Guard will establish and enforce “a 500-meter safety zone” around the Shell Oil Company’s drilling vessel Noble Discoverer as it drills exploratory offshore wells in the sensitive Arctic waters off the coast of Alaska beginning this July. The ‘buffer zone’ would apply to all vessels, but the ‘special rules’ are clearly designed to make it more difficult for those trying to protest against the Shell’s oil drilling in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas this summer. “For any group or individual intending to conduct lawful demonstrations in the vicinity of the Noble Discoverer,” reads the USCG memo, “These demonstrations must be conducted outside the safety zone.” While acknowledging the negative impact on the “environment and indigenous people” a mid-ocean collision caused by environmental activists attempting to block or board the ship could have in the Arctic, the USCG report made no mention of what impact a massive oil spill in the area would have on the same.

 

 

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File under Culture, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Goin’ Hog Wild

  • Nick said: “We were stunned.

    “I thought, ‘My God what is it?’ It’s like nothing we have ever seen – it almost looks prehistoric.”

    The couple, who were walking their dogs at Bridge of Don, Aberdeen, called coastguards to investigate.

  • BHOPAL: This real life incident has the making of a scene from some vampire movie. A 22-year-old woman in Damoh district of Madhya Pradesh has told the police that her husband drank her blood for the past three years. “He used to take a syringe and draw blood from my arms,” Deepa Ahirwar said. “He would then empty it in a glass and drink it. For three years he did this on a regular basis, threatening me of dire consequences if I revealed this to anyone.”
  • According to the lawsuit, Dr. Anthony Pickett performed the circumcision on the boy, now 8, at the Maternity Center of Vermont on Jan. 3, 2003. Pickett used a Miltex Mogen clamp that removed 85 percent of the top of the boy’s penis, according to the suit.

    “Because of the defective design of the circumcision clamp, there was no protection for the head of the penis and Dr. Pickett was unable to visualize the (head) when excising the foreskin,” according to the plaintiffs’ court papers filed regarding the settlement. “For this reason, an amputation to the (head) of plaintiff’s penis occurred.”

  • Owning yeast and sugar isn’t enough to get you arrested in most places. But in some communities of rural Alaska, the high rate of alcohol abuse has caused voters to ban booze along with possession of the supplies to make it at home.

    A recent case highlights a 2007 state law that makes it illegal for a person to possess yeast and sugar in a local option community if they intend to use the ingredients to make home-brew, a cloudy, intoxicating liquid often mixed with fruit juice. Villages have the option to ban booze as one way to combat to a longstanding epidemic of alcohol-related injuries and deaths in rural Alaska.

  • A Japanese rock musician who tried to hang himself after being arrested for unruly behaviour on a flight to the Mariana Islands has died in hospital, reports say.

    Rocker Taiji Sawada, who was best known as the former bass player with heavy metal group “X”, died yesterday when medics at Saipan’s Commonwealth Health Centre turned off his life support, the Saipan Tribune reported.

    The Marianas Variety newspaper reported that Sawada, 45, had been in intensive care since July 14 after he tried to hang himself with a bedsheet in a jail in the US-administered Pacific territory.

    He had been arrested three days before for allegedly assaulting a female cabin crew attendant during a Delta Airlines flight from Tokyo to Saipan, court documents showed.

  • After 15 years of market growth…[dealers] were finding it harder to sell drugs, as pay cuts, tax rises and job losses left recreational users with less money. The Irish gangs were unable to shift larger hauls and, in any case, lacked the resources to buy in bulk, so they were ordering smaller quantities. This liquidity crisis was an unfamiliar problem for criminals used to having a river of money at their disposal.

    User arrests are down by 20% in recent years and the value of drugs seized—used as a proxy for market size—has hit 15-year lows. This demand elasticity is evident in both hard and soft drug markets: the value of cocaine seized last year is less than half that of previous years, marijuana’s a tenth of its 2006 peak. Even heroin junkies have economised; the value of seized heroin has fallen more than 85% since 2008.

  • Eight illegal immigrants from Mexico were arrested on drug trafficking charges after federal and Las Vegas law enforcement officials seized 212 pounds of drugs worth an estimated street value of $5.7 million in the largest methamphetamine bust in Nevada history, authorities announced Thursday.

    Police also seized $280,000 in cash, six guns and nine vehicles used for drug trafficking after searching nine residential properties in Las Vegas and Henderson on Tuesday.

    Law enforcement officials heralded the record bust as a significant blow to Las Vegas’ illegal underground that would be felt by every player, including drug bosses, small-time dealers and users hoping to score on the street. The raid yielded four pounds of heroin and 208 pounds of methamphetamine in varying stages of processing, from its liquid form to the crystal-like pieces sold on the street in small quantities for consumption.

  • There was a time when a mushroom cloud billowing over the Nevada desert was celebrated as a symbol of American strength — and, about 75 miles southeast in Las Vegas, as a terrific tourist draw.

    In the 1950s, casinos threw “dawn parties,” where gamblers caroused until a flash signaled the explosion of an atomic bomb at the Nevada Test Site. Tourism boosters promoted the Atomic Cocktail (vodka, brandy, champagne and a dash of sherry) and pinups such as Miss Atomic Blast, who was said to radiate “loveliness instead of deadly atomic particles.”

    Sixty years after the first atmospheric tests here, the 1,375-square-mile site continues to be a tourist magnet, though of a far different nature. Thousands of people each year sign up months in advance to see what is essentially a radioactive ghost town.

  • If your heritage is non-African, you are part Neanderthal, according to a new study in the July issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution. Discovery News has been reporting on human/Neanderthal interbreeding for some time now, so this latest research confirms earlier findings.

    Damian Labuda of the University of Montreal’s Department of Pediatrics and the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center conducted the study with his colleagues. They determined some of the human X chromosome originates from Neanderthals, but only in people of non-African heritage.

    “This confirms recent findings suggesting that the two populations interbred,” Labuda was quoted as saying in a press release. His team believes most, if not all, of the interbreeding took place in the Middle East, while modern humans were migrating out of Africa and spreading to other regions.

  • Some close to Bachmann fear she won’t be equal to the stress of the campaign, much less the presidency itself.

    “When she gets ‘em, frankly, she can’t function at all. It’s not like a little thing with a couple Advils. It’s bad,” the adviser says. “The migraines are so bad and so intense, she carries and takes all sorts of pills. Prevention pills. Pills during the migraine. Pills after the migraine, to keep them under control. She has to take these pills wherever she goes.”

    To staff, Bachmann has implausibly blamed the headaches on uncomfortable high-heel shoes, but those who have worked closely with her cite stress, a busy schedule and anything going badly for Bachmann as causes.

  • “I have to say, marijuana saved my life,” Lynx told me. “I would probably be dead if I didn’t have it.” She discovered pot while recovering from her cancer treatments. She’d been prescribed morphine and OxyContin, which she quit cold turkey. One day when she was having a bout of nausea, a friend offered her a toke. She was reluctant at first. The girls’ biological father had been “a druggie” when they were young, Lynx said.

    But the drug worked wonders, and soon Lynx became one of the first five minors to get a medical marijuana card in Montana. Now Lamb has one, too.

    Pot has also helped the twins rekindle the creative impulses they once channeled into their music. They’ve both taken up painting — astrological themes, mostly — and Lynx restores furniture. They hope to enroll in college, and intend to dedicate themselves to making medical marijuana legal in all 50 states.

  • Within 20 minutes of arriving through his front door she had flagged down a car and caught a train. He found out she had also run up a £500 bill on his mobile phone.

    Heartbroken Mr Gannon, who married Patrice in Jamaica early this year, believes his new wife fled to Bristol to meet a Jamaican boyfriend with whom she had organised the scheme.

  • Yesterday, historian and author Barry H. Landau was arrested on charges of stealing historical documents, including ones signed by Abraham Lincoln, from the Maryland Historical Society. The arrest eventually led to Landau’s locker, where police found upwards of 60 documents worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    Laudau’s heist and the tremendous value of the stolen documents got us thinking about the other end of the literature theft spectrum: what are the most frequently stolen books from bookstores?

    The results are surprisingly consistent–the same books and authors keep getting stolen across the country, so much so that many of them are frequently shelved behind the counter. Here are 5 of the most frequently stolen books, with sources listed below.

  • The main ingredients are melatonin, a hormone that is intended to induce drowsiness; L-theanine, an amino acid primarily found in green tea; GABA, a chemical that calms the mind; B vitamins, and chamomile — a plant that often winds up as tea that people drink to help them unwind.
  • Rupert Murdoch, the Chairman and CEO of News Corporation, was the target of “a white foam pie” attack on Tuesday as he was testifying before a British Parliament committee about the News of the World phone hacking scandal.
  • Apparently, the white boy was in the wrong country.
    Treat the non-whites in white countries like kings and queens but don’t receive the same treatment in their country, a bit funny, isn’t it?
    The poor little kid… If I knew who he was, I would raise him, I’m still not sure if he’s dead or alive, such a poor kid… another kid bites the dust from non-whites action as always.
    He is white, why does people get upset when I mention the word WHITE?
    This is life, accept it.
    The Chinese people are saying “white boy, go home, go away”.
  • An electronic DOT road sign was apparently hacked when a displayed message read “Impeach Obama.”
  • After inhaling a mall-bought batch of “Iaroma”—a synthetic pot substitute sold as ‘incense’—a 19-year-old Chicago boy dies after taking a 100 mph joyride into a neighbor’s house.
  • Baphomet is an enigmatic, goat-headed figure found in several instance in the history of occultism. From the Knights Templar of the Middle-Ages and the Freemasons of the 19th century to modern currents of occultism, Baphomet never fails to create controversy. But where does Baphomet originate from and, most importantly, what is the true meaning of this symbolic figure? This article looks at the origins of Baphomet, the esoteric meaning of Baphomet and its occurrence in popular culture.
  • The man, John Blanchard, was allegedly smoking crystal meth at the storage yard near his camper when he left a propane torch ignited on the ground, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

    The torch flame lit a container of gunpowder Blanchard was apparently stockpiling, causing an explosion.

    A loaded rifle was recovered from the scene as was more gunpowder and 300 feet of detonation cord found in an open safe, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

  • Amid news that troubled rap veteran Earl “DMX” Simmons had allegedly been caught smuggling contraband into prison thus extending his sentence, a spokesperson from the Arizona Department of Corrections has decried the erroneous reports that the rapper committed the said offense.

    Barrett Marson, the media contact that dismissed the reports, gave a quote to website Rumorfix stating, “He did not smuggle drugs into prison. He failed a drug test, I don’t know what drugs he took, but that’s it. He was due to be released today but will now be released on July 19th.” Prison records show that DMX was not exactly a model prisoner with several disciplinary write-ups including drug test failure, disorderly conduct and possession of drugs.

  • Mota went to speak with the driver, who said he was there to deal with the lack of a license plate. Mota smelled marijuana inside the vehicle, he said.

    Officers found the 17 pounds in large plastic containers and called county narcotics officers to investigate.

    The driver indicated he had paperwork for possessing medical marijuana but 17 pounds is well over allowable limits, Mota said.

  • Mortgage industry employees are still signing documents they haven’t read and using fake signatures more than eight months after big banks and mortgage companies promised to stop the illegal practices that led to a nationwide halt of home foreclosures.

    County officials in at least three states say they have received thousands of mortgage documents with questionable signatures since last fall, suggesting that the practices, known collectively as “robo-signing,” remain widespread in the industry.

  • The Army refuses to release information on its investigation into whether a three-star general conducted psychological operations on members of Congress during their visits to Afghanistan, according to the two Army information operations officers at the center of the controversy.
    Michael Holmes, the officer who says he refused orders to conduct Psy-Ops on American officials, and Laurel Levine filed a federal FOIA complaint, saying the Army and the U.S. Army Central Command refused to release the records.
    Holmes and Levine says the Army investigation “also covered allegations of whistleblower retaliation conducted against the plaintiffs for challenging unlawful orders.”
  • Bad hoodoo from the Jessamine County Fair. Dark times. A champion laid low. On Wednesday, David L. Warner Jr., of Nicholasville, Ky., drove a beaut of a derby in the ultra-competitive small car class. Warner demolished many things on his way to the title. But instead of getting to enjoy his victory, Warner got busted for DUI. The champion had allegedly been pounding Bud Lights before the derby, according to a whole bunch of dirty snitches who ratted him out to the cops.
  • Human rights lawyers are seeking an arrest warrant against a former CIA legal director who allegedly approved drone attacks in Pakistan that killed hundreds.
    It’s claimed John Rizzo agreed on a list of people to be targeted by drone strikes – a practice which started in 2004 under the Bush administration. For more on this RT joined by Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer.
  • Julia Sullivan wants to be a cheerleader.

    She likes to dance. She wants to get people excited for games. She has friends on the cheerleading squad.

    “I just think it would be fun,” the 16-year-old said.

    So she’s practiced. Her older sister, a former cheerleader, helped her figure out ways she could cheer from her wheelchair. Julia, who’ll be a junior at Aurora High School this fall, was born without legs and with arms that stop short of her elbows.

    This spring, for the third time, she tried out to be a cheerleader. For the third time, she didn’t made the squad.

    Last month, she and her parents, Mike and Carolyn Sullivan, asked the Aurora school board to correct what they see as “scoring errors” in her tryout evaluations this spring, saying she was given no accommodation for her disability.

    Their attorney cited the Americans With Disabilities Act and other federal laws that prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities.

  • On June 1, the Taliban raided the Taliban crossed the border from Afghanistan and raided the Shaltalu area of the district of Dir in northwestern Pakistan. This video shows the execution of more than a dozen Pakistani policemen who were captured during the fighting. The Taliban leader gives a speech prior to executing the Pakistani men:

    “These are the enemies of Islam who originated from Pakistan. They are the Pakistani police, soldiers and their supporters who recently lined up six kids in Swat and shot them execution style. These Pakistanis are now our captive and we will avenge the death of the children by doing the same to them.”

  • There has been speculation for months now that the House Republicans’ transportation bill proposal would be terrible for transit, biking, and walking. And sure enough, John Mica didn’t disappoint.

    The chair of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee yesterday released a six-year reauthorization proposal that would slash overall transportation funding 33 percent and eliminate dedicated funds for biking and walking.

  • That then gave them access across large parts of the News International network, possibly including the archived emails, and to the Sun’s “content management system” (CMS) – which formats news onto pages. That will have included the code for the “breaking news” element of the Sun’s main webpage; changing the entire content on the page would be too obvious.

    By including a line of Javascript in the “breaking news” element, the hackers were able to ensure that anyone visiting the Sun’s home page would, as the ticker was automatically refreshed, they would be redirected to anywhere that the hackers chose.

    Initially they made it redirect to a fake page they had created at new-times.co.uk/sun which attempted to look and read like a Sun story claiming that Rupert Murdoch had been found dead. That page used a template of another story that first appeared on 14 July, suggesting that the hackers either grabbed an archived story or have had access since then.

  • Video – Rep. Jan Schakowsky On WLS Chicago – July 13, 2011The proof comes at the 3:20 mark, but the entire clip is worth seeing.

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File under Culture, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 20, 2011

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Livin’ In A Banksters Paradise

  • The court approved the judicial equivalent of an extreme makeover, paying $125 a day for the services of a cosmetologist to cover up the tattoos that Mr. Ditullio has gotten since his arrest.
  • An official familiar with the situation told CNBC that 1.1 billion of the new bills have been printed, but they are unusable because of a creasing problem in which paper folds over during production, revealing a blank unlinked portion of the bill face.
  • A former Western New York elementary school principal who has served 18 months in prison for possession of child pornography will be released after an appeals court in Florida overturned his conviction. A three-judge panel of the Second District Court of Appeal in Lakeland, Fla., ruled Friday that the photos held by John R. Stelmack aren’t child pornography because they showed the nude bodies of adults. Photos of children’s faces, including two students from schools where Stelmack had served, had been superimposed on the bodies, but none of the altered pictures showed naked children, according to the Lakeland Ledger. “Unseemly as the images in this case may be, their possession is not [outlawed in Florida] because the only sexual conduct in the images is that of an adult,“ Judge Morris Silberman wrote in the opinion, which was joined by the two other judges.
  • It all sounded quite important, and the program’s slogan is pretty catchy. But after you get past the pandering sound bites, a question comes to mind: is anyone in the corner offices of Wall Street’s biggest firms or corporate America’s biggest companies paying any attention to Mr. Holder’s “strong message”? Of course not. (I actually called some chief executives after Mr. Holder’s news conference, and not one had heard of Operation Broken Trust.) That’s because in the two years since the peak of the financial crisis, the government has not brought one criminal case against a big-time corporate official of any sort. Instead, inexplicably, prosecutors are busy chasing small-timers: penny-stock frauds, a husband-and-wife team charged in an insider trading case and mini-Ponzi schemes.
  • The initial attacks against PayPal were substantially ineffective; the PayPal blog was taken offline, but the main PayPal site wasn’t harmed. The attacks against PostFinance, however, have resulted in the bank’s website being unavailable for more than 16 hours. It remains unavailable at the time of writing. The latest target is the site of the Swedish prosecutors in Assange’s sexual misconduct trial. This too appears to be offline. Twitter has also been named as a future attack target, due to its claimed censorship of the #wikileaks hashtag.
  • (Low Orbit Ion Cannon) is a network stress testing application, written in C# and developed by “praetox”. It attempts a Denial-of-Service attack on the target site by flooding the server with TCP packets, UDP packets, or HTTP requests with the intention of disrupting the service of a particular host. The program was exploited during Project Chanology to attack Scientology websites, and is currently being used by Operation Avenge Assange (Earlier known as Operation Payback) to attack the websites of companies and organizations that have opposed WikiLeaks.
  • The users, who collectively call themselves “anonymous,” are public enemy number one of the entertainment industry, which accuses the vast majority of them of piracy and lending support to the groups that host pirated content online. As the rhetoric has increased in recent months, though, the entertainment industry has learned that poking the hornet’s nest can be painful. Vigilante users of the site have taken it upon themselves recently to launch a flurry of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks on a number of Websites with ties to all corners of the entertainment industry.
  • Neighbors gasped when authorities showed them photos of the inside of the Southern California ranch-style home: Crates of grenades, mason jars of white, explosive powder and jugs of volatile chemicals that are normally the domain of suicide bombers. Prosecutors say Serbian-born George Jakubec quietly packed the home with the largest amount of homemade explosives ever found in one location in the U.S. and was running a virtual bomb-making factory in his suburban neighborhood. How the alleged bank robber obtained the chemicals and what he planned to do with them remain mysteries. Now authorities face the risky task of getting rid of the explosives. The property is so dangerous and volatile that that they have no choice but to burn the home to the ground this week in a highly controlled operation involving dozens of firefighters, scientists and hazardous material and pollution experts.
  • US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gave a public speech in January 2010 championing Internet freedom as a vital tool to open governments and promote transparency, while criticizing “dictatorships” who seek to target those who use technology to expose their transgressions.
  • The “this” that I’m talking about in the title of today’s post is the way in which the fetuses pictured in this atlas of activity were made to be in motion: the fetuses experienced needle stimulations to theirl faces, and hands, and arms, and so on. Needles inserted, movie images made, experiments undertaken on the development of human fetal activity. 42 fetuses subjected to experimentation, physiological and morphological, poked with needles to determine how they would respond during the integral period of development of motility (from the 8th to 14th weeks, in regard to reflexes). The fetuses float in front of the camera unencumbered, and then the long and very pointed needle comes into view, finding its target, then a series of stills from the film made to show how the fetus moved in reaction to having been touched or abraised.
  • A soft landing for America 40 years from now? Don’t bet on it. The demise of the United States as the global superpower could come far more quickly than anyone imagines. If Washington is dreaming of 2040 or 2050 as the end of the American Century, a more realistic assessment of domestic and global trends suggests that in 2025, just 15 years from now, it could all be over except for the shouting.
  • Just when I thought the banksters couldn’t possibly shock me anymore… they did. We were finally granted the honor and privilege of finding out the specifics, a limited one-time Federal Reserve view, of a secret taxpayer funded “backdoor bailout” by a small group of unelected bankers. This data release reveals “emergency lending programs” that doled out $12.3 TRILLION in taxpayer money – $3.3 trillion in liquidity, $9 trillion in “other financial arrangements.” Wait, what? Did you say $12.3 TRILLION tax dollars were thrown around in secrecy by unelected bankers… and Congress didn’t know any of the details?
  • Google’s monopoly, algorithms, and privacy policies
  • One of the women that is accusing WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange of sex crimes appears to have worked with a group that has connections to the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). James D. Catlin, a lawyer who recently represented Assange, said the sex assault investigation into the WikiLeaks founder is based on claims he didn’t use condoms during sex with two Swedish women. Swedish prosecutors told AOL News last week that Assange was not wanted for rape as has been reported, but for something called “sex by surprise” or “unexpected sex.”
  • What have we learned so far from the disclosure of more than 21,000 transactions?We have learned that the $700 billion Wall Street bailout signed into law by President George W. Bush turned out to be pocket change compared to the trillions and trillions of dollars in near-zero interest loans and other financial arrangements the Federal Reserve doled out to every major financial institution in this country. Among those are Goldman Sachs, which received nearly $600 billion; Morgan Stanley, which received nearly $2 trillion; Citigroup, which received $1.8 trillion; Bear Stearns, which received nearly $1 trillion, and Merrill Lynch, which received some $1.5 trillion in short term loans from the Fed. We also learned that the Fed’s multi-trillion bailout was not limited to Wall Street and big banks, but that some of the largest corporations in this country also received a very substantial bailout. Among those are General Electric, McDonald’s, Caterpillar, Harley Davidson, Toyota and Verizon.

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on December 8, 2010

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