GPS

Royal Wedding Update

  • Those low-cost embedded tracking devices in your smartphone or those personal GPS devices that track the whereabouts of your children, car, pet, or shipment can easily be intercepted by hackers, who can then pinpoint their whereabouts, impersonate them, and spoof their physical location, a researcher has discovered.
  • If the system works as the government’s proposal says it should, there wouldn’t be much opportunity for Homeland Security to track your compartmentalized online information anyway. But there’s no denying that the government is currently pursuing two policies in cyberspace that now seem at odds with each other. On the one hand, it wants to make your online identity so secure and private — even more so than in the real world — that it swears even the government can’t track you. But on the other, federal law enforcement agencies are actively pursuing expanded powers to wiretap online communications.
  • One reason that Social Security numbers are so fouled up is that they’re used as both identifiers—a way to keep track of which Joseph Smith you are—and as authenticators—a way for your cell phone carrier to verify that you are, in fact, Joseph Smith when you call to change your plan. Alessandro Acquisti, the lead author on the recent SSN-cracking paper, makes an analogy to phone numbers. Your number, which you’re generally comfortable sharing with friends and colleagues, is a way of identifying you. The PIN number you punch in when you dial in to your voice mail is a way of authenticating that you’re the owner of that number. No rational person, of course, would choose a PIN number that’s the same as their phone number. But that’s the way Social Security numbers work.
  • The tens of thousands of cops, firefighters, construction workers and others who survived the worst terrorist assault in U.S. history and risked their lives in its wake will soon be informed that their names must be run through the FBI’s terrorism watch list
  • NASA scientists recently discovered an underground dry ice lake containing more carbon dioxide than originally thought. The trapped carbon dioxide is thought to have come from the planet’s atmosphere earlier in its history when it was conducive for life on Mars to exist.
  • “We’ll see who can stand against you,” reads the Hebrew line to the right corner of the picture.
  • Two people charged in a staged Texas bank heist apparently didn’t think twice when they typed messages in the “What’s on your mind?” portion of their Facebook pages, court documents show.

    “Get $$$(;.,” wrote bank employee Estefany Danelia Martinez, 19, two days before $62,201 was taken from the International Bank of Commerce in Houston, according to an affidavit from FBI Special Agent Kevin J. Katz.

    According to the affidavit, filed with a criminal complaint in federal court this week, her boyfriend, Ricky Gonzalez, 18, wrote on his page on March 24, the day after the robbery, “Wipe my teeth with hundereds (sic).”

  • News that teenagers purportedly playing “the knockout game” beat to death an elderly man in St. Louis brought back frightening memories for Karen Taylor.

    Taylor’s son, Adam, was similarly targeted in a parking garage in Columbia, Mo., in June 2009. A group of teens randomly ambushed the then-25-year-old, hitting him and kicking him as he lay on the ground writhing in pain. They told police they wanted to find an unsuspecting person and knock them out with one punch as part of a game called “Knockout King.”

  • Inked on the pudgy chest of a young Pico Rivera gangster who had been picked up and released on a minor offense was the scene of a 2004 liquor store slaying that had stumped Lloyd for more than four years.

    Each key detail was right there: the Christmas lights that lined the roof of the liquor store where 23-year-old John Juarez was gunned down, the direction his body fell, the bowed street lamp across the way and the street sign — all under the chilling banner of RIVERA KILLS, a reference to the gang Rivera-13.

    As if to seal the deal, below the collarbone of the gang member known by the alias “Chopper” was a miniature helicopter raining down bullets on the scene.

    Thanks Ramon.

  • Advertisements that promote products as luxurious or “high-end” have been banned in a move experts say is designed to protect social harmony.

    The clean up means commercials posted or aired in public can no longer include words like “supreme”, “royal”, “luxury” or “high class”, all of which frequently appear in Chinese promotions for real estate developments, vehicles and wines.

    According to a March 17 press release issued by the Beijing Administration for Industry and Commerce, officials will target advertisements that “promote hedonism” or “the worship of foreign-made products”.

  • A baby girl starves to death as her parents raise a virtual child online; a boy scolded for excessive gaming kills his mother then commits suicide — technology addiction is taking a toll in Asia.
  • Thanks NoFavorite.
  • The global economy and its recovery, and the living standards of millions of plain folks, are now at risk from the sudden rise in oil and commodity prices.

    Gas at the pump is up, and going higher. Food prices are following.

    The consequences are catastrophic for the global poor as their costs go up while their income doesn’t. It’s menacing American workers too, who in large part have not seen a meaningful raise since the days of Reagan (keeping it this way is clearly behind the current flurry of attacks on unions).

  • In case you haven’t noticed, the world is on the verge of a horrific global food crisis. At some point, this crisis will affect you and your family. It may not be today, and it may not be tomorrow, but it is going to happen. Crazy weather and horrifying natural disasters have played havoc with agricultural production in many areas of the globe over the past couple of years. Meanwhile, the price of oil has begun to skyrocket.

    The entire global economy is predicated on the ability to use massive amounts of inexpensive oil to cheaply produce food and other goods and transport them over vast distances. Without cheap oil the whole game changes. Topsoil is being depleted at a staggering rate and key aquifers all over the world are being drained at an alarming pace. Global food prices are already at an all-time high and they continue to move up aggressively. So what is going to happen to our world when hundreds of millions more people cannot afford to feed themselves?

  • President Barack Obama came to office on a tide of voters eager to see a change in more than just the White House’s occupant. Two years into his presidency — and one day after he launched his 2012 reelection campaign — and even some of his most ardent supporters are having trouble coming to terms with the answer to Sarah Palin’s 2010 question: “How’s that hopey, changey stuff working out?”
  • Among the non-invasive methods, tested on 109 subjects, so-called penile extenders that stretch the phallus through traction were shown to be most effective.

    One study reported an average increase of 1.8 centimetres (0.7 inches), while another measured an extra 2.3 centimetres (0.9 inches) in a flaccid state, and 1.7 centimetres (0.67 inches) when erect.

    But the regimen for achieving these gains was arduous: six hours of daily traction over four months in the first case, and four hours every day over six months in the second.

    Another device, known as a “penis pump,” uses a manual or motorised pump to create a vacuum inside a hard cylinder sheath, stretching the phallus.

  • Suspect is seen shooting teenager in Brownsville, Brooklyn.
  • The growing use of unmanned aircraft in combat situations raises huge moral and legal issues, and threatens to make war more likely as armed robots take over from human beings, according to an internal study by the Ministry of Defence.

    The report warns of the dangers of an “incremental and involuntary journey towards a Terminator-like reality”, referring to James Cameron’s 1984 movie, in which humans are hunted by robotic killing machines. It says the pace of technological development is accelerating at such a rate that Britain must quickly establish a policy on what will constitute “acceptable machine behaviour”.

  • Rotten Ronnies is a magnet for violence once again. Are people fightin’ over jobs at McDonalds?!
  • On April 15th the National Socialist Movement held our 2011 National Meeting. With approximately 80 Party members in attendance, along with a few respected guests we started our dinner in a Church Hall. We had a couple men posted outside to watch over the parking lot and building. It is well known that the ara, anarchists, and communist black block groups will attack cars and buildings, as well as women and children. Just before the meeting was to begin, an armed group of about 30 or more masked anarchists launched an attack upon the Church Hall, our Comrades, and one of the cars before we beat them back in (legal) self defense. The commie scum attacked us with 2 by 4 boards, mace, clubs, knives, bricks, tree branches, glass bottles, and other weapons.
  • The American Independent has previously reported on the growing corporatization of the incipient medical marijuana industry at a time when medical marijuana dispensaries scrabble to hold on to their businesses in the face of a multi-pronged federal crackdown. But there are signs afoot that it just may become ever more corporate if a Big Pharma push to get the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to recognize a cannabis-derived drug is successful.
  • Sonny Pierce was old school. The latest dating vehicles of the Internet age such as justachat or match.com weren’t his style. The 27-year-old Pierce of suburban Chicago preferred to troll for new talent via phone sex chat lines. And he apparently was a hit with the ladies…
  • Street Fighter 2 style
  • The parlour in Compton, southern California, lets mourners grieve through a bullet-proof glass chamber that is visible from the street.

    Peggy Scott Adams, owner of the Robert L. Adams Mortuary funeral home, said the 3.6m drive-through is a unique feature that sets the business apart from other parlours, the Los Angeles Times reports.

    “You can come by after work, you don’t need to deal with parking, you can sign the book outside and the family knows that you paid your respects,” said Scott Adams, whose parlour has been in business since 1974.

    “It’s a convenience thing.”

  • He tried to paint this victims car by removable paint. But the victim got really mad.
  • On 20 June 1942, the SS guard stationed at the exit to Auschwitz was frightened. In front of him was the car of Rudolph Höss, the commandant of the infamous concentration camp. Inside were four armed SS men, one of whom – an Untersturmführer, or second lieutenant, was shouting and swearing at him.

    “Wake up, you buggers!” the officer screamed in German. “Open up or I’ll open you up!” Terrified, the guard scrambled to raise the barrier, allowing the powerful motor to pass through and drive away.

    Yet had he looked closer, the guard would have noticed something strange: the men were sweating and ashen-faced with fear. For far from being Nazis, the men were Polish prisoners in stolen uniforms and a misappropriated car, who had just made one of the most audacious escapes in the history of Auschwitz. And the architect of the plot, the second lieutenant, was a boy scout, to whom the association’s motto “Be prepared” had become a lifeline.

  • Sixteen years ago Tom Klein was staring at a Woody Woodpecker cartoon, “The Loose Nut,” when he started seeing things.

    Specifically, Mr. Klein watched that maniacal red-topped bird smash a steamroller through the door of a shed. The screen then exploded into images that looked less like the stuff of a Walter Lantz cartoon than like something Willem de Kooning might have hung on a wall.

    “What was that?” Mr. Klein, now an animation professor at Loyola Marymount University, recalled thinking. Only later, after years of scholarly detective work, did he decide that he had been looking at genuine art that was cleverly concealed by an ambitious and slightly frustrated animation director named Shamus Culhane. Mr. Culhane died in 1996, a pioneer whose six decades in animation included the sequence of the dwarfs marching and singing “Heigh Ho” in the 1937 film “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”

  • A serendipitous discovery by academics at The University of Nottingham has shown that a simple illusion can significantly reduce — and in some cases even temporarily eradicate — arthritic pain in the hand.

    By tricking the brain into believing that the painful part of the hand is being stretched or shrunk, the researchers were able to halve the pain felt by 85 per cent of sufferers they tested.

    The research could point to new technologies of the future which could assist patients in improving mobility in their hand by reducing the amount of pain they experience while undergoing physiotherapy.

  • If you spend much time online, chances are you have stumbled upon photos often referred to as “The Marijuana house” or “The Great Tennessee Pot Cave”. The photos are of a seemingly normal house with a huge marijuana grow operation hidden in a cave beneath the house. While these pictures have made their rounds on the internet for years, details on the story behind the photos are vague at best. I have always wondered the real story behind the photos of this amazing setup. The full story.
  • “As far as soldiers go, he was the elite of the elite,” said Rustam Zaripon, manager of the Russian Baths in Brooklyn and a friend of escaped suspect Nikolai Rakossi.

    “He’s a very calm and powerful man,” Zaripon told the Daily News. “He served tours in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Africa.”

    Russian Army veteran Rakossi, 56, is wanted for the vicious weekend stabbing murders of Tatyana Prikhodko and her stunning daughter Larisa.

  • One county on the edge of the Missouri Ozarks seemed oddly immune to the scourge of methamphetamine ravaging the state, boasting few meth raids or arrests in recent years. Some residents now think they know why, after a meth bust landed the Carter County sheriff himself in jail.

    Tommy Adams, county sheriff for a little more than two years, was arrested earlier this month after giving meth to an informant at his cabin on a remote and hilly gravel road, according to a court document. He also allegedly snorted the drug himself with a straw. Authorities would not detail the extent of Adam’s alleged meth involvement, but charged him with meth distribution. He is being held in Cape Girardeau County jail on $250,000 bond.

  • Venice Beach, CA. LAPD Police officers were present at a large gathering of youth in Venice Beach for about an hour, then left. Shortly thereafter, people just started fighting and it quickly just turned into an all out brawl with knives and people hitting one another with skateboards and closed fists. LAPD moved back in to disperse the crowd.
  • The infamous killer, who started championing environmental causes from behind bars, bemoaned the ‘bad things’ being done to environment in a rambling phone interview from his Californian jail cell.

    ‘Everyone’s God and if we don’t wake up to that there’s going to be no weather because our polar caps are melting because we’re doing bad things to the atmosphere.

    ‘If we don’t change that as rapidly as I’m speaking to you now, if we don’t put the green back on the planet and put the trees back that we’ve butchered, if we don’t go to war against the problem…’ he added, trailing off.

    Manson, who described himself to his interviewer as a ‘bad man who shoots people’, brainwashed members of a commune known as The Family into butchering eight people including film director Roman Polanski’s pregnant wife Sharon Tate in July and August 1969.

  • Police in the southwestern Illinois city of Belleville say the videotaped attack of a 17-year-old student by two other riders on a school bus appears to be racially motivated.
  • The smell of marijuana smoke is no longer enough reason for police to order someone out of a car, now that pot has been decriminalized in Massachusetts, the state’s highest court said in a decision published on Tuesday.
  • Currently, Mars has a thin atmosphere dominated by carbon dioxide, with pressures at most of the planet’s surface so low that liquid water will immediately boil. But a variety of features we’ve discovered argue that the planet has once supported copious amounts of water, indicating that the planet’s atmosphere must have differed considerably in the past. Using radar data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, scientists have now found a potential resting place for some material that was once in the Martian atmosphere: a huge deposit at the south pole that holds nearly as much CO2 as the planet’s current atmosphere.
    Thanks Nico.
  • Governments that use nuclear energy are torn between the benefit of low-cost electricity and the risk of a nuclear catastrophe, which could total trillions of dollars and even bankrupt a country.

    The bottom line is that it’s a gamble: Governments are hoping to dodge a one-off disaster while they accumulate small gains over the long-term.

    The cost of a worst-case nuclear accident at a plant in Germany, for example, has been estimated to total as much as €7.6 trillion ($11 trillion), while the mandatory reactor insurance is only €2.5 billion.

    “The €2.5 billion will be just enough to buy the stamps for the letters of condolence,” said Olav Hohmeyer, an economist at the University of Flensburg who is also a member of the German government’s environmental advisory body.

  • MOCA’s exhibit, Art in the Streets (reviewed here), is the inaugural show of its new director, Jeffrey Deitch, a former New York gallery owner and art agent. Deitch’s now-shuttered Soho gallery showcased vandal-anarchist wannabes whose performance pieces and installations purported to strike a blow against establishment values and capitalism, even as Deitch himself made millions serving art collectors whose fortunes rested on capitalism and its underpinning in bourgeois values. MOCA’s show (which will also survey skateboard culture) raises such inconsistencies to a new level of shamelessness. Not only would MOCA never tolerate uninvited graffiti on its walls (indeed, it doesn’t even permit visitors to use a pen for note-taking within its walls, an affectation unknown in most of the world’s greatest museums); none of its trustees would allow their Westside mansions or offices to be adorned with graffiti, either.

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File under Animation, Culture, Graffiti, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by SeMeN SPeRmS on April 23, 2011

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Dastardly ‘n Diabolical

  • Here is another fine example of the trend of violence in fast food restaurants. Two black females beating the hell out of a white patron, while several black employees stand by and watch. One black male manages to provide the facade of assistance to the white victim in this brutal attack.
  • The diverse wilderness of life inside of our bodies is just starting to gain the attention of scientists. The human gut alone typically holds some 100,000 billion bitty bacteria, and with no two people’s microbiomes being the same, classifying these crucial organisms has been challenging.

    A new study, published online April 20 in Nature, proposes a simple schematic for profiling people’s gut microbiota, breaking down these helpful hangers-on into three overarching categories. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.)

    “The three gut types can explain why the uptake of medicines and nutrients varies from person to person,” Jeroen Raes, a bioinformatician at Vrije University in Brussels and coauthor of the new study, said in a prepared statement. “This knowledge could form the basis of personalized therapies,” by basing treatments on the known metabolic tendencies of a person’s microbiota category.

  • The “sievert”, as Elliott says, is a dose unit for quantifying radiation risk. He did not add that it assumes dose density is uniform. “There are many kinds of radiation”, he says, but he does not mention how they differ. In fact, external sources like cosmic rays and x-rays distribute their energy evenly, like the sun; others, notably alpha-emitters like uranium, are extremely uneven in the way they irradiate body tissue once they have been inhaled or swallowed.

    Because alpha particles emitted from uranium atoms are relatively massive, they slow down rapidly, concentrating all their energy into a minuscule volume of tissue. Applying the sievert to this pinpoint of internal radiation means conceptualising it as a dose to the whole body. It’s an averaging error, like believing it makes no difference whether you sit by the fire to warm yourself or eat a burning coal. The scale of the error can be huge.

  • A rare look at the inside of Philip K. Dick’s condo! Here is the attendant interview, from Slash magazine, May 1980:

    Philip K. Dick is 51 years old. Since 1955 he’s written 35 books that have been translated into eighteen languages. He has five ex-wives, two cats and lives 10 minutes from Disneyland. Of the books he has written, his personal favorites are, The Man in the High Castle, Dr. Bloodmoney, and Through a Scanner Darkly. His latest book, VALIS, will be released in February, with the sequel to be published sometime in the spring. Mr. Dick says he doesn’t take drugs anymore, but thinks about them all the time. Despite stories to the contrary, he’s a real charming guy.

    The interview was conducted in Mr. Dick’s conapt by Gary and Nicole Panter. K.W. Jeter, one of Dick’s close friends and author of the yet unpublished but excellent DR. ADDER, attended and added his comments.

  • The woman started screaming, and was able to get her blindfold off, only to realize she was shackled to the ceiling in Hauff’s “torture chamber” filled with whips, syringes, belts, paddles, “sexual devices,” locks, ropes, chains, tubes, and two devices designed for “administer[ing] electricity to the human body.”

    According to court documents, the walls in the “torture room” are eight inches think, “making most sounds—such as screams—emanating from inside the room almost undetectable.”

    The woman asked Hauff to let her go, but he told her “no,” put the blindfold on her, and let the room for about 15 minutes. He returned and began plucking out the woman’s pubic hair, and then stuck electrodes to her and began shocking her. He did this for about three hours, police say.

    Hauff then used a speculum and catheter on her, and bound her until some of her extremities turned blue.

  • Thanks projectfathom
  • A man who has had repeated bouts of depression cut off one of his own fingers, cooked it with some vegetables and ate it.

    The bizarre case of “self-cannibalism” is the first known in New Zealand and one of only eight reported around the world.

  • Trying to bring a history lesson on the American Civil War to life, teacher Jessica Boyle turned her fourth grade Norfolk, Virginia, classroom into a slave auction: she ordered black and mixed-race students to one side of the classroom; then the white students took turns buying them.
  • A group of self-confessed radical pirates are pinning their hopes on gaining official recognition of their own unique belief system. The founders of the Missionary Church of Kopimism – who hold CTRL+C and CTRL+V as sacred symbols – hope that along with this acceptance will come harmony, not just with each other, but also with the police.
  • It just seems too strange to be true.

    But in the frozen wastes of Siberia two walkers claim to have found the body of an alien.

    On its side with its mouth slightly agape, the slender, badly-damage body lies half-buried in snow close to Irkutsk, Russia.

    The area is a known UFO hotspot and video of the alien’s corpse has become a massive worldwide hit with hundreds of thousands of followers after being posted on the internet.

  • Almost half of the meat and poultry sold at U.S. supermarkets and grocery stores contains a type of bacteria that is potentially harmful to humans, a new study estimates.

    Researchers tested 136 packages of chicken, turkey, pork, and ground beef purchased at 26 grocery stores in five cities around the country, and found that 47 percent contained Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a common cause of infection in people.

    What’s more, roughly half of the contaminated samples contained strains of the bacteria that were resistant to at least three antibiotics, such as penicillin and tetracycline. Some strains were resistant to a half dozen or more.

  • BP Plc filed a lawsuit for more than $42 billion (25 billion pounds) against Halliburton (NYSE: HAL – news) , which cemented the blown-out well which caused the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, after claiming a similar sum from rig owner Transocean (NYSE: RIG – news) .

    Analysts said BP had little chance of winning the cases and was more likely trying to force the companies to settle. Management experts said pursuing the lawsuits could further damaged BP’s already battered reputation as well as reveal yet more embarrassing details of the way the disaster was handled.

  • One year after the chocolaty crude started spewing out of the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico, leading to the largest accidental oil spill in history, scientists say they’re still trying to piece together what’s happening to the environment.

    Some potential clues about the impact of the spill have made themselves known: dead baby dolphins and sea turtles; oiled brown pelicans; fish with strange sores; sticky marsh grasses; tar balls on beaches.

    But the big picture hasn’t come into focus yet.

  • It only takes one rained-out Little League game to make a sports lover resent Mother Nature. Now some of today’s scientists and other bigwigs have taken it upon themselves to say: “no more.” Not content to stand idly by and let something as mundane as climate dictate the success of our sports games, they have instead turned to geoengineering – intentional manipulation of the Earth’s environment – to fight back.

    Qatari engineers recently announced a project to develop solar-powered artificial clouds to shade the 2022 World Cup from the country’s unforgiving summer sun. One remotely steerable cloud comes with a hefty price tag – $500,000 – just to cool the field by 10 degrees.

  • Would you feel comfortable if market researchers could know your every thought?

    A headband designed by San Francisco firm EmSense can sense your brainwaves as you have reactions to watching something and then record the data for researchers.

    The process of measuring your reaction to something is known as ‘quantitative neurometrics’ and it can be carried out as you watch a computer or television screen.

  • A small camera fitted to the glasses can capture 400 facial images per second and send them to a central computer database storing up to 13 million faces.

    The system can compare biometric data at 46,000 points on a face and will immediately signal any matches to known criminals or people wanted by police.

    If there is a match a red signal will appear on a small screen connected to the glasses, alerting the police officer of the need to take further action or make an arrest.

    The devices will soon be tested at football matches and concerts and police in Brazil, South America’s biggest country, are already planning to use them during the next World Cup.

  • Colonies of aliens living on planets within black holes may not be as far-fetched as it sounds.

    Some black holes have a complex internal structure that allows photons, particles and planets to orbit a central singularity, according to one scientist.

    A singularity is the region in a black hole when space and time become infinite.

  • A Brazilian man has claimed his wife attempted to kill him by putting poison into her vagina and inviting him to drink from the furry cup.

    The unnamed husband, from São José do Rio Preto, in the state of São Paulo, told cops he and his missus had an argument. She then allegedly doused her privates with a “toxic substance” before suggesting her other half eat at the Y.

    Luckily for the intended victim, he smelt something fishy before diving in, and thwarted the cunning cunnilingual plan.

  • A troubled 19-year-old stabbed himself to death on stage at an open mic night after playing a song called Sorry For All the Mess.

    Kipp Rusty Walker repeatedly plunged the six-inch blade into his chest as the audience clapped and cheered in the mistaken belief it was piece of performance art.

    But when he collapsed in a pool of his own blood they started screaming in horror and rushed to help him, but his wounds were too severe and he died soon after.

  • Here’s one way to show your contempt of court.

    Investigators say an Ohio man was caught on tape stealing a judge’s gavel from a courtroom in Lorain.

    Footage shows a man identified as Christopher Collins, 39, entering Municipal Court Magistrate Chris Cook’s courtroom on March 30 and approaching the bench.
    Collins, accompanied by another individual who has not been charged, appears to grab the gavel and slip it into his shirtsleeve before exiting the empty courtroom.

  • Police in Moscow have discovered what they are calling an “underground town” housing illegal immigrants from Central Asia in a Soviet-era bomb shelter in the west of the city.

    The discovery was made by police and agents from the FSB security agency and Federal Migration Service.

    The underground area was guarded by a four-metre-high [13 feet] concrete wall and barbed wire, said Andrei Mishel of the Russia’s ministry of the interior.

    It housed 110 men and women.

  • Italian police arrested a Naples butcher after discovering worm-infested meat for sale in his store that was 10 years past its expiry date, the ANSA news agency reported Friday.

    Shocked food safety inspectors discovered pasta and biscuits crawling with parasites, rotting meats and dairy products, and olives covered in mold in the store of horrors.

  • The Michigan State Police have started using handheld machines called “extraction devices” to download personal information from motorists they pull over, even if they’re not suspected of any crime. Naturally, the ACLU has a problem with this.

    The devices, sold by a company called Cellebrite, can download text messages, photos, video, and even GPS data from most brands of cell phones. The handheld machines have various interfaces to work with different models and can even bypass security passwords and access some information.

    The problem as the ACLU sees it, is that accessing a citizen’s private phone information when there’s no probable cause creates a violation of the Constitution’s 4th Amendment, which protects us against unreasonable searches and seizures.

  • TESTS on a substance recovered during three drugs raids in a Plymouth street yesterday, believed to be the class A drug heroin, have revealed it was chocolate-flavoured protein powder.
  • Your iPhone has a hidden feature: It tracks and records your location constantly whether you want it to or not. What? You wish it wouldn’t do that without your knowledge or consent? Too bad, because there’s not much you can do about the tracking feature right now.

    Alasdair Allan and Pete Warden, a pair of security researchers, recently discovered that iPhones — as well as 3G-enabled iPads — running iOS 4 constantly record and store their users’ locations in unencrypted files. These files are basically very long lists of latitude-longitude coordinates and timestamps, and they can be found on the devices themselves as well as within the software backups saved on users’ computers.

  • A New Jersey woman was stabbed in the face with a pen on a New York City subway train after she tried to stop a man from lighting a cigarette.

    The assault occurred on a crowded No. 3 train near the Chambers Street station during Tuesday’s morning rush.

    Witnesses told the Daily News and the New York Post that an argument quickly escalated when Evelyn Seeger asked the man not to smoke. The witnesses say two riders were trying to restrain the man when he pulled out a pen and slashed Seeger’s face.
    Thanks Ramon

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File under Horror, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by SeMeN SPeRmS on April 22, 2011

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Sunday Slaughter

  • IT WAS just after midday in San Diego, California, when the disruption started. In the tower at the airport, air-traffic controllers peered at their monitors only to find that their system for tracking incoming planes was malfunctioning. At the Naval Medical Center, emergency pagers used for summoning doctors stopped working. Chaos threatened in the busy harbour, too, after the traffic-management system used for guiding boats failed. On the streets, people reaching for their cellphones found they had no signal and bank customers trying to withdraw cash from local ATMs were refused. Problems persisted for another 2 hours.

    It took three days to find an explanation for this mysterious event in January 2007. Two navy ships in the San Diego harbour had been conducting a training exercise. To test procedures when communications were lost, technicians jammed radio signals. Unwittingly, they also blocked radio signals from GPS satellites across a swathe of the city.

  • The leader of a Satanic sex cult is facing a lengthy jail sentence after being found guilty of multiple counts of rape and child abuse.

    Colin Batley, 48, exercised absolute control over his sect in a seaside cul-de-sac – abusing and exploiting helpless children as ‘sex toys’ for more than a decade.

    He was found guilty yesterday of 35 sex offences against children and young adults. Yet social services were alerted to Batley’s child abuse in 2002 – and took no action.

  • The moral of the story is this: just because you have it, doesn’t mean you can handle it. Find out what you can safely spend or borrow, far away from the margin of worry. Talk to a financial adviser and identify where your danger zone is (Holt Renfrew, anyone?), before you blindly wander into it and can’t find a way back out. As the story of Ms. Kluge goes to show, a billion here, a billion there, pretty soon you’re talking real money.

    And babe, even a billionaire can go broke.

  • “One can sum up all of Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking in two sentences from page 297, where author Christopher Hadnagy writes ‘tools are an important aspect of social engineering, but they do not make the social engineer. A tool alone is useless; but the knowledge of how to leverage and utilize that tool is invaluable.’ Far too many people think that information security and data protection is simply about running tools, without understanding how to use them. In this tremendous book, Hadnagy shows how crucial the human element is within information security.”
  • What a bunch of garbage!

    An elderly Manhattan woman living on Social Security was slapped with a $100 ticket — for throwing away a newspaper in a city trash can.

    Delia Gluckin, 80, tossed the paper, which was in a white plastic shopping bag, in a bin right outside her Inwood apartment building Saturday morning and was immediately ambushed by a Department of Sanitation agent wielding a handheld computerized ticket book.

    “I was walking to take the subway downtown and dropped it in a trash can, and this lady in a blue uniform ran up to me,” Gluckin told The Post.
    “I thought she was going to ask for directions. She said, ‘You just dropped garbage in there,’ ” according to Gluckin.

    “I said, ‘I didn’t, it was just a newspaper,’ and I offered to take it out,” said Gluckin, who had bought the Post at a deli and then tossed it after reading it.

    Sanit cop Kathy Castro wrote Gluckin the summons for putting “improper refuse” in a city litter basket.

  • There are more than 2,000 ground robots fighting alongside flesh-and-blood forces in Afghanistan, according to Lt. Col. Dave Thompson, the Marine Corps’ top robot-handler. If his figures are right, it means one in 50 U.S. troops in Afghanistan isn’t even a human being. And America’s swelling ranks of groundbot warriors are being used in new, unexpected, life-saving ways.
  • Three hours after I gave my name and e-mail address to Michael Fertik, the CEO of Reputation.com, he called me back and read my Social Security number to me. “We had it a couple of hours ago,” he said. “I was just too busy to call.”

    In the past few months, I have been told many more-interesting facts about myself than my Social Security number. I’ve gathered a bit of the vast amount of data that’s being collected both online and off by companies in stealth — taken from the websites I look at, the stuff I buy, my Facebook photos, my warranty cards, my customer-reward cards, the songs I listen to online, surveys I was guilted into filling out and magazines I subscribe to.

  • The now-trendy concept of Big Data usually implies ever-growing hordes of data, including unstructured info posted on Facebook and Twitter, and ways of gleaning intelligence from all of it to create business opportunities. The concept, however, also carries with it risks for anyone opening up about themselves on the Internet and raises questions about who exactly owns all this data.
  • Explicit cartoons, films and books have been cleared for use to teach sex education to schoolchildren as young as five.

    A disturbing dossier exposes a wide range of graphic resources recommended for primary school lessons.

    The shocking material – promoted by local councils and even the BBC – teaches youngsters about adult language and sexual intercourse.

  • Most male mammals wield a penis covered with spines made of keratin, the same material that forms fingernails, to sweep out competitors’ sperm and irritate a female into ovulating. You can add humans’ lack of penile spines to the list of ways we are misfits among primates, along with our absence of tails and fur. Even chimpanzees, our closest relatives, have penile spines. A new study suggests that this feature disappeared due to a chunk of DNA that went missing after our evolutionary divergence from chimps. The researchers have identified another DNA deletion that may have contributed to humans’ bigger brains.
  • “I call it ‘guybrows,’ ” Mr. Gafni said. “I don’t create an arch for men. You want to take the weight out of it and groom the brow, but you don’t want it to look ‘done.’ Sometimes I even leave a couple stray hairs so it looks less done, and I would never do that for women.”
  • He’s the man with the (82) Julia Roberts tattoos. Yes, you read that right. The New York Post says a 56-year-old Mexican man has inked the “Pretty Woman” on his arms, his back and chest. All of his Julia’s are taken from movie scenes and feature the actress in a variety of moods—“smiling and waving, pouting, looking serious and sitting in a chair.”
  • German hacker [Patrick Priebe] recently constructed a laser pulse gun that looks so good, it could have easily come off a Hollywood movie set. Its sleek white and black exterior adds intrigue, but offers little warning as to how powerful the gun actually is.

    Fitted with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, it fires off a 1 MW blast of infrared light once the capacitors have fully charged. The duration of the laser pulse is somewhere near 100ns, so he was unable to catch it on camera, but its effects are easily visible in whatever medium he has fired upon. The laser can burst balloons, shoot through plastic, and even blow a hole right through a razor blade.

  • When pop stars Mariah Carey, Beyoncé, Nelly Furtado and 50 Cent recently said they’d renounced millions of dollars they’d received for performing for members of Libyan strongman Moammar Kadafi’s family, they drew attention to a growing and controversial cultural phenomenon: celebrity artists being hired by rich, powerful and sometimes disreputable clients to play at private or semi-private functions.
  • But their most interesting attack focused on the car stereo. By adding extra code to a digital music file, they were able to turn a song burned to CD into a Trojan horse. When played on the car’s stereo, this song could alter the firmware of the car’s stereo system, giving attackers an entry point to change other components on the car. This type of attack could be spread on file-sharing networks without arousing suspicion, they believe. “It’s hard to think of something more innocuous than a song,” said Stefan Savage, a professor at the University of California.
  • Researchers at the Medical College of Georgia say venom from a spider native to Central and South America gives people four-hour erections, and could possibly cure some of the worst cases of impotence – cases not even Viagra could adequately treat.
  • All-out war remains a fairly unlikely scenario, but should the clock ever strike midnight we may well discover, finally, whether or not the internet really could survive a nuclear conflict.

    If it could, then a handful of datacenters dotted around the world would likely to be all that remains of the multi-billion-pound hosting industry.

    These secretive, high-security sites, tunnelled out of mountains or housed behind the blast-proof doors of one-time Nato bunkers, are home to the planet’s most secure hosting providers.

  • “If an extraterrestrial spaceship ever lands on Earth, I bet you that it is 99.9999999 percent likely that what exits that ship will be synthetic in nature,” said Michael Dyer, a professor of computer science at the University of California, Los Angeles (appropriately enough).

    In civilizations advanced enough to travel between the stars, it is quite likely that machines have supplanted their biological creators, some scientists argue. Automatons — unlike animals — could withstand the hazards to living tissue and the strain on social fabrics posed by a long interstellar voyage.

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When We Do Right, Nobody Remembers. When We Do Wrong, Nobody Forgets.

    • English occultist Aleister Crowley wasn’t merely a poet, painter and the Great Beast 666, he was also an aspiring chef! That’s right and if you’d like to make some magick in the kitchen tonight, The Master Therion’s recipe for his “famous” (or would that be “infamous”) curried rice dish, “Riz Aleister Crowley”
    • Only $700
    • Surprising subjects rendered expertly in wood and glass
    • When Huntington Beach, Calif., detectives searched Rodney Alcala’s Seattle storage locker during the Robin Samsoe murder investigation in 1979, they discovered a cache of photos, many of them young women in suggestive, and even pornographic poses.In March 2010, after a third jury in 30 years handed Alcala a death sentence, Huntington Beach police released more than 100 of those photos hoping to identify the women and some children, and learn if Alcala claimed still more victims.

      Most of those who have been identified are alive and well. But investigators continue to get new tips every day.

    • “An alcohol-laced energy drink equivalent to at least three beers, a can of Red Bull and a shot of espresso has prompted a New Jersey college to ban the drink after nearly two dozen students were hospitalized for alcohol intoxication.”
    • With all its mod-cons no more than two steps away, this tiny city centre apartment in Rome is compact in every way – except its breathtaking 50,000 Euro price tag.The former porter’s cupboard – which measures just five square metres – was put on the market this week by the Italian owner who claims he’s been flooded with queries.

    • Wiggle it: J-Lo has always maintained a healthy lifestyle but still has not managed to escape the dreaded orange peel
    • Le Café de L’Enfer was a Hell-themed café in Paris’ red light district (aka Pigalle, the neighborhood of the Moulin Rouge), created in the late 19th century and operating up ’til sometime around the middle of the 20th.
    • Last week in Colorado we’ve seen President Obama portrayed as a terrorist, illegal immigrant, gambler and homosexual all in the same billboard in Grand Junction, with the title “Vote DemocRAT.”Then there’s the online ad for Amendment 62, the so-called “personhood” amendment that would grant rights to “every human being from the beginning of the biological development of that human being.” That two-minute video attributes “the decline of America” to Colorado’s 1967 approval of abortion to save a mother’s life or in cases of rape or incest. At one point, Obama’s face appears, morphing from the grim reaper, with the words “Then the Angel of Death arrived and Hell followed with him.” As ominous music plays in the background, the video notes, “He took over banks, industry, and finally, our health care.” The video from Personhood USA is titled “The Prolife Tea Party Vote.”

    • Alison Murray travels as a hobo on freight trains across Canada and the US. She gets to know the community of train riders, especially the many girls riding the rails.
    • Drug companies have long kept secret details of the payments they make to doctors for promoting their drugs. But seven companies have begun posting names and compensation on the Web, some as the result of legal settlements. ProPublica compiled these disclosures, totaling $258 million, into a single database that allows patients to search for their doctor. Receiving payments isn’t necessarily wrong, but it does raise ethical issues.
    • When a pigeon was gobbled up by a greedy pelican, it looked like instant game over for the little bird.But when the predator unexpectedly opened up his huge beak again, the pigeon was given a chance to save himself and fly away.

      Confusingly, however, the dopey bird instead chose to simply sit in the beak taking in the view – and missed his only opportunity to escape.

      Not surprisingly, he was eaten up.

    • The last name of Green Party gubernatorial candidate Rich Whitney is misspelled as “Whitey” on electronic-voting machines in nearly two dozen wards — about half in predominantly African-American areas — and election officials said Wednesday the problem cannot be corrected by Election Day.
    • “Pearl Necklace is a seemingly amorphous cast silver shape on a chain that is actually an accurate representation of semen.”
    • “Packages will cost several thousand Hong Kong dollars (several hundred U.S. dollars) and include: a wedding dress crafted out of balloons, baked apple pie wedding cake, and childish party favors.”
    • The front-page newspaper story featured a list of Uganda’s 100 “top” homosexuals, with a bright yellow banner across it that read: “Hang Them.” Alongside their photos were the men’s names and addresses.
    • Over the weekend, the Washington Post provided some more details about the ongoing foreclosure fraud scandal, noting that “virtually everyone involved – loan servicers, law firms, document processing companies and others – made more money as they evicted more borrowers from their homes, creating a system that was vulnerable to error and difficult for homeowners to challenge.” A bevy of Democratic lawmakers have called for examinations of the banks’ potentially fraudulent activities, while the Attorneys General of all fifty states have pledged a coordinated investigation.Republicans, however, have been largely silent on the issue. And according to Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA), who is slated to take over the House Committee on Government and Oversight should the Republicans gain a majority, the GOP is not really interested in the banks’ malpractice. Instead, Issa wants to “launch aggressive inquiries” into whether the government helped poor people buy houses they couldn’t afford

    • “Of 7800 images, 5.5% contain genital sites. Of all requests, 11% were for anatomic sites (37% genital sites); 62% were specified for diagnoses (12% genital sites). When age group and anatomic site were specified, the relative risk of a child being requested (vs adult) was 1.48 (95% confidence interval 1.44-1.53). Of 10000 free text queries, 12% retrieved images containing genital sites. Of all referrals, 14.3% originated from nonmedical (pornography/fetish) Web sites.”
    • At least 750 kilos of “double dead” or tainted hog meat were seized while three suspected vendors of the hot meat were arrested in a predawn raid on a market in Quezon City Wednesday.
    • The iconic statue – which stands at 305ft tall – was built in 1886 and is said to attract over 600 bolts of lightning each year.
    • Mexican security forces have seized 105 tonnes of US-bound marijuana in the border city of Tijuana with an estimated street value of about $340m.
    • “In the end, the product planners lost a key part of the debate. The winners: executives who argued that giving automatic privacy to consumers would make it tougher for Microsoft to profit from selling online ads. Microsoft built its browser so that users must deliberately turn on privacy settings every time they start up the software.Microsoft’s original privacy plans for the new Explorer were “industry-leading” and technically superior to privacy features in earlier browsers, says Simon Davies, a privacy-rights advocate in the U.K. whom Microsoft consulted while forming its browser privacy plans. Most users of the final product aren’t even aware its privacy settings are available, he says. “That’s where the disappointment lies.”

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    Conjured by SeMeN SPeRmS on October 20, 2010

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    I’m In A Police State Of Mind

    • After the September 26 FBI raids on peace activists’ homes in Minneapolis, Chicago and North Carolina, it appears to depend on who’s speaking and what they’re saying.
      The pretext for the raids was investigating “material aide to terrorists”, resulting in grand jury subpoenas and confiscation of computers, books, music CDs and from one home, a Martin Luther King poster. The targeted Minneapolis activists have openly protested US military policy since the 1980s. The FBI certainly knows they have nothing to do with terrorism. These activists simply have the audacity to challenge bi-partisan US invasions, occupations and support for dictatorships and human rights abusers. Dissent on the left has long been seen as ‘criminal behavior’. Where once “the communist threat” was the argument for such repression, now, “terrorism” is.
    • A new proposal by a top Microsoft executive would open the door for government licensing to access the Internet, with authorities being empowered to block individual computers from connecting to the world wide web under the pretext of preventing malware attacks.
    • The White House blocked efforts by federal scientists to tell the public just how bad the Gulf oil spill could have been, according to a panel appointed by President Barack Obama to investigate the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history.
    • Earlier this year, Mark Zuckerberg suggested that privacy was no longer a social norm. “People have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and different kinds, but more openly and with more people,” the Facebook CEO said at the Crunchie awards in January. However, a new Zogby poll shows that younger Internet users are far less comfortable with the state of our privacy online than Zuckerberg’s statement suggests.
    • Are the people who think Kanye West is ‘real art’ the same ppl who are like ‘Die Antwoord is the effing shit, yall’?
    • What do gang members look like? A bestselling rapper and music mogul with 10 Grammys under his belt and millions of dollars in his pocket according to the front page of the Miami Police Department’s website.
    • A California student got a visit from the FBI this week after he found a secret GPS tracking device on his car, and a friend posted photos of it online. The post prompted wide speculation about whether the device was real, whether the young Arab-American was being targeted in a terrorism investigation and what the authorities would do.

      It took just 48 hours to find out: The device was real, the student was being secretly tracked and the FBI wanted their expensive device back, the student told Wired.com in an interview Wednesday.

    • Newly obtained video that was reluctantly released by NIST after a lawsuit by the International Center for 9/11 Studies shows two firefighters on 9/11 discussing how secondary explosions occurred immediately before the collapse of the twin towers, providing damning new evidence that explosive devices were used to bring down the buildings.
    • A commission appointed by Barack Obama, the US president, to investigate the disaster said in a draft report that his administration was either not fully competent to handle the situation or not completely honest.

      “By initially underestimating the amount of oil flow and then, at the end of the summer, appearing to underestimate the amount of oil remaining in the Gulf, the federal government created the impression that it was either not fully competent to handle the spill or not fully candid with the American people about the scope of the problem,” the report, released on Wednesday, has concluded.

    • The company behind the idea, Internet Eyes, says it will help fight crime.
      But Daniel Hamilton, of campaign group Big Brother Watch, said: ‘It’s astonishing to think that innocent people doing their shopping could soon be spied on by an army of busybodies with an internet connection.
      ‘CCTV should be used sparingly to help solve real crimes, not to encourage this type of tawdry voyeurism.’

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    Conjured by SeMeN SPeRmS on October 8, 2010

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    ☀~De Tease~☀

    • Officers found Hamilton to have her pants unbuttoned with a female sex toy in her lap. She told officers she had been using the toy while driving, as well as watching a video on a computer her passenger was holding. It is not clear what the nature of that video was. Hamilton was also found to be in possession of a broken crack pipe.
    • Allegedly, the anxious folks at these various luxury houses are all aggressively gifting our gal Snookums with free bags. No surprise, right? But here’s the shocker: They are not sending her their own bags. They are sending her each other’s bags! Competitors’ bags! Call it what you will — “preemptive product placement”? “unbranding”? — either way, it’s brilliant, and it makes total sense. As much as one might adore Miss Snickerdoodle, her ability to inspire dress-alikes among her fans is questionable. The bottom line? Nobody in fashion wants to co-brand with Snooki.
    • The Minneapolis city attorney’s office has decided to pay seven zombies and their attorney $165,000. The payout, approved by the City Council on Friday, settles a federal lawsuit the seven filed after they were arrested and jailed for two days for dressing up like zombies in downtown Minneapolis on July 22, 2006, to protest “mindless” consumerism.
    • The mushy, disturbingly uniform innards recalled the thick, pulpy aftermath of something you dissected in biology class: so intrinsically disagreeable that my throat nearly closed up reflexively. But the funny thing about Nutraloaf is the taste. It’s not awful, nor is it especially good. I kept trying to detect any individual element—carrot? egg?—and failing. Nutraloaf tastes blank, as though someone physically removed all hints of flavor. “That’s the goal,” says Mike Anderson, Aramark’s district manager. “Not to make it taste bad but to make it taste neutral.” By those standards, Nutraloaf is a culinary triumph; any recipe that renders all 13 of its ingredients completely mute is some kind of miracle.
    • Government agents can sneak onto your property in the middle of the night, put a GPS device on the bottom of your car and keep track of everywhere you go. This doesn’t violate your Fourth Amendment rights, because you do not have any reasonable expectation of privacy in your own driveway – and no reasonable expectation that the government isn’t tracking your movements.
    • The men face charges involving at least six different family members and multiple animals. Christian Stolzfus is charged with repeated sexual assault of a child, four counts of first-degree sexual assault of a child under the age of 13 without great bodily harm; attempted first-degree sexual assault of a child under the age of 13 without great bodily harm; two counts of incest; exposing genitals or pubic area; and two counts of sexual gratification with an animal. Authorities said that they believe these incidents occurred during a four-year period. Dannie Stolzfus is charged with two counts of incest and sexual gratification with an animal. Authorities said that they believe these incidents occurred over a three-year period.
    • Sounds like angel dust perception.
      Thanks Wade Oates

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    Shut Yer Piehole, Shitbird!

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