Martin Luther King | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on March 28, 2015

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RIP H.R. Giger


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Alcohol kills 3.3 million people worldwide each year, more than AIDS, tuberculosis and violence combined
rawstory.com/rs/2014/05/12/…

Woman who wrote fake Holocaust memoir must pay back $22.5M to publisher
foxnews.com/us/2014/05/12/…

The NSA has been covertly implanting interception tools in US servers heading overseas
theguardian.com/books/2014/may…

The Bud Light-ification of Bud – Homogenizing Marijuana
nytimes.com/2014/05/18/mag…

Bobby Lund – Trepanation Interview

Could Porn Addiction Become a Viable Workplace Disability?
business.avn.com/articles/legal…
UN to Debate the Use of Fully Autonomous Killer Robot Weapons
ibtimes.co.uk/should-killer-…

From Martin Luther King to Anonymous, the state targets dissenters not just “bad guys”
theguardian.com/world/2014/may…

A Doctor Explains Why Getting Kicked in the Balls Hurts So Damn Much
nerve.com/love-sex/why-g…

New brain cells erase old memories
nature.com/news/new-brain…

Diesel Dope, Monster Trucks, and Snotty Dispensary Clerks: A Veteran Pot Grower’s Back-to-the-Land Adventure
motherjones.com/environment/20…

Amazon Is Deleting Sex Workers’ Wish Lists Without Warning
dailydot.com/lifestyle/amaz…

Your Food Is Poisoning You
outsideonline.com/fitness/bodywo…

Study: People Ignored On Facebook Feel Isolation, Less ‘Meaningful Existence’
atlanta.cbslocal.com/2014/05/13/stu…

Dusted Naked Dancing Man Draws Crowd Disturbs Parents
‘He was doing the Beyonce, the surf bort, twerking,the Nae Nae’
khou.com/news/local/Dan…

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Have You Ever Wondered What A Virus Sounds Like?

✪ Ron Jeremy exclusive: Will the condom law be a wrap for porn industry in L.A.?
An HIV-positive adult film actor is hailing the Los Angeles City Council’s final approval of a city law requiring condoms on porn sets – but veteran star Ron Jeremy thinks its dirty politics. Jeremy, originally from New York, told the Daily News he believes this week’s vote is part of a larger effort to stamp out porn production in the industry’s sunny San Fernando Valley home. “Performers don’t mind wearing rubbers, but viewers don’t want to see it. It ruins the fantasy,” Jeremy said Wednesday. “This will force production to leave Los Angeles, and that’s really what the supporters want,” he claimed. The legendary lothario said local porn purveyors are already feeling the squeeze from a flood of overseas imports and low-budget, amateur productions – and new condom requirements will make competitive success even harder. He said mandatory, monthly STD testing – now the industry standard – is more than adequate to keep performers safe.
✪ Feds Say 7 Behind Celeb-endorsed Megaupload.com Ran Massive, Worldwide Piracy Ring
Federal prosecutors have shut down one of the world’s largest file-sharing sites, Megaupload.com, on charges of violating piracy laws — a day after a 24-hour blackout of popular websites such as Wikipedia drew national attention to the issue. “This action is among the largest criminal copyright cases ever brought by the United States,” the Justice department said in a statement about the indictment. The indictment accuses seven individuals and two corporations — Megaupload Limited and Vestor Limited — of costing copyright holders more than $500 million in lost revenue from pirated films and other content. It was unsealed on Thursday, and claims that at one point Megaupload was the 13th most popular website in the world.
✪ Google Is Already Using SOPA-Like Censorship
However, Google’s main issue with SOPA is seemingly not related to their concerns about Chinese-style web censorship becoming commonplace, but rather which entity gets to wield those powers – large transnational corporations or governments. While Google criticizes SOPA publicly, it is already privately using SOPA-like powers to unfairly marginalize legitimate web content. Google News is a content aggregator that allows users to search thousands of news sources for relevant stories. Although the aggregator includes a plethora of obscure, occasionally offensive, and barely-read websites, in November 2010 Google took the decision to de-list PrisonPlanet.com and Infowars.com from its indexed news sources. Infowars.com alone is an internationally recognized news website that gets more traffic than MSNBC.com and innumerable other big mainstream news websites.
✪ Protest against discrimination of Ethiopian Jews
Thousands of Israelis have taken to the streets of Jerusalem, in protest against what they say is discrimination against Jews of Ethiopian origin. The protest came after a recent report in the Israeli media that landlords in southern Israel had agreed not to rent or sell their real estate to Jews of Ethiopian origin.
✪ Goodbye, Fish: Rising CO2 Direct Threat to Sea Life “Driving Fish Crazy”
New research shows the disastrous consequences the world’s rising carbon dioxide levels are having on ocean life. Photo courtesy of Dr Simon Foale, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies A team of researchers from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and James Cook University published their findings in the journal Nature Climate Change. They document how elevated CO2 is “driving fish crazy.”
✪ WiFi signal with racist, anti-Semitic slur in Teaneck, NJ sparks police probe; signal came from rec center router
A bigot named their WiFi signal “F— All Jews and N—-” — and now cops are investigating. The hateful signal I.D. popped up on the iPhone of a 28-year-old mom inside a Teaneck, N.J. recreation center, where her 3-year-old daughter was attending dance class. The offending signal was coming from a router connected in the Richard Rodda Community Center in the the township, located 10 miles outside New York City. “When I first saw it, I said, ‘Did that say what I thought it said?,” said the woman, who asked that her name not be used. “I was shocked, hurt. I felt harassed.” The signal showed on her phone as it searched for an Internet connection in the center Tuesday. “I felt like I’m bringing my daughter to this place, and it should be a safe place,” she said.
✪ Scientists Create World’s Tiniest Ear
Have you ever wondered what a virus sounds like? Or what noise a bacterium makes when it moves between hosts? If the answer is yes, you may soon get your chance to find out, thanks to the development of the world’s tiniest ear. The “nano-ear,” a microscopic particle of gold trapped by a laser beam, can detect sound a million times fainter than the threshold for human hearing. Researchers suggest the work could open up a whole new field of “acoustic microscopy,” in which organisms are studied using the sound they emit.
✪ The Rise of the New Groupthink
SOLITUDE is out of fashion. Our companies, our schools and our culture are in thrall to an idea I call the New Groupthink, which holds that creativity and achievement come from an oddly gregarious place. Most of us now work in teams, in offices without walls, for managers who prize people skills above all. Lone geniuses are out. Collaboration is in. But there’s a problem with this view. Research strongly suggests that people are more creative when they enjoy privacy and freedom from interruption. And the most spectacularly creative people in many fields are often introverted, according to studies by the psychologists Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Gregory Feist. They’re extroverted enough to exchange and advance ideas, but see themselves as independent and individualistic. They’re not joiners by nature.
✪ NYPD developing portable body scanner for detecting concealed weapons
You have to feel sorry for the police officers who are required to frisk people for guns or knives – after all, if someone who doesn’t want to be arrested is carrying a lethal weapon, the last thing that most of us would want to do is get close enough to that person to touch them. That’s why the New York Police Department teamed up with the United States Department of Defense three years ago, and began developing a portable scanner that can remotely detect the presence of a gun on a person’s body. The NYPD announced the project yesterday.
✪ Scientists Uncover The Mathematics Of Serial Killers
Andrei Chikatilo, “The Butcher of Rostov,” was one of the most prolific serial killers in modern history. Between 1978 and 1990 in the Ukraine, he committed at least 52 murders before he was caught, tried and executed. The pattern of his murders, though, was irregular. There were long periods of no activity, interrupted by several murders within a short period of time. Hoping to gain insight into serial killings to prevent similar murders, his pattern of behavior was examined by Mikhail Simkin and Vwani Roychowdhury at UCLA. They’ve published a paper on ArXiv with their preliminary results.
✪ Fake iPad 2s made of clay sold at Canadian stores
As many as 10 fake iPad 2s, all made of slabs of modeling clay, were recently sold at electronic stores in Vancouver, British Columbia. Best Buy and Future Shop have launched investigations into how the scam was pulled off. The tablet computers, like most Apple products, are known for their sleek and simple designs. But there’s no mistaking the iPad for one of the world’s oldest “tablet devices.” Still, most electronic products cannot be returned to stores. For the the stores and customers to be fooled by the clay replacements, the thieves must have successfully weighed out the clay portions and resealed the original Apple packaging.
✪ For rent: Hitler’s Wolf’s Lair
Anybody willing to pay the asking rent of £90,000 a year can take over the 13-hectare site in a secluded forest in eastern Poland, which during the war lay in German East Prussia. From 1941 to the end of 1944 the Wolf’s Lair was the nerve centre of the Nazi war machine owing to its proximity to the Eastern Front. The Polish Forestry Service, the owners of the camp, started looking for a tenant after the old 20-year lease expired. Hitler and his henchman built huge bombproof bunkers at the site that also housed 2,000 staff and security personnel. Although retreating German forces dynamited most of the bunkers in November 1944, their shattered shells remain a prime tourist attraction with some 180,000 visitors a year.
✪ The Great Martin Luther King Copyright Conundrum
Believe it or not, to legally watch that famous Martin Luther King “I Have a Dream” speech — arguably one of the most hallowed moments in American history — costs $10 thanks to the twisted state of United States copyright law.
✪ World’s Largest Garment Made From Golden Spider Silk Goes on Display
Before anyone asks, no, it’s not bulletproof. But that doesn’t mean that the glistening yellow cape—the world’s largest garment made entirely from spider silk—isn’t a massive feat of engineering to marvel at (hint: it is and you should). Now on public display for the first time at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, the textile gets its unearthly gleam from the undyed filaments of the golden orb spider, a species of arachnid commonly found in Madagascar. Girl power can be taken literally in this instance: Only the females produce the coveted silk.
✪ NSFW: An Alabama Fan Teabagged A Passed-Out LSU Fan At The Bourbon Street Krystal
Those of us un/fortunate enough to have visited the Krystal restaurant at the mouth of Bourbon Street in New Orleans know it’s a place where the occasionally odd, bizarre, or criminal events take place. We don’t know which of these this incident is, if not all three. That’s especially given that some people are claiming the victim in this is now dead, making the “This guy’s life is over” line uttered in the video creepy.
✪ Funk Legend Jimmy Castor Dead At 64
Funk/disco great Jimmy “The Everything Man” Castor passed away on Monday from unknown causes in Las Vegas, according to reports. Castor, a respected saxophonist, was the leader of the seminal funk/disco band the Jimmy Castor Bunch. The group was behind funk classics like the 1972 smash, “Troglodyte (Cave Man).” Though the group’s popularity faded at the end of the disco era, Castor’s music lived on through hip hop as his song “It’s Just Begun” became a staple break of the ’70s and ’80s b-boy break dancing scene. The song served as the back up music for the iconic b-boy collective the Rock Steady Crew in the 1983 film Flashdance. Eric B. and Rakim, the Ultramagnetic MCs, N.W.A., and Kanye West were among the hip hop names to sample Castor’s tunes over the years.
✪ Radioactive tissue holders found at Bed, Bath & Beyond reveal hypocrisy of failed national security
The Dual Ridge Metal Boutique tissue boxes sold at Bed, Bath & Beyond stores have been discovered to be radioactive. Made with the extremely dangerous material used to blast cancer tumors with radiation — cobalt-60 — they emit gamma rays that are known to cause both cancer and infertility. They were manufactured in India, shipped on a commercial container to New Jersey, and then distributed to Bed, Bath & Beyond stores in 20 states. How much radiation do these tissue holders emit, exactly? Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokesman David McIntyre said, on the record, that standing near one of these tissue holders for 30 minutes a day would expose you to the equivalent of “a couple of chest X-Rays” each year. The Illinois Emergency Management Agency went even further, issuing a release stating that every 10 hours spent near the product would expose you to the equivalent of one chest X-Ray
✪ Big Brother Brazil: Daniel Echaniz ‘raped Monique Amin on live TV’ after alcohol-fueled party
A housemate on Brazil’s version of Big Brother has been raped live on TV, it has been alleged. Police today confirmed they had begun an investigation and carried out a search of the studios in Rio de Janeiro, where the popular reality show is being filmed. Viewers were shocked in the early hours of Sunday to watch contestant Daniel Echaniz 31, apparently force himself on 23-year-old student Monique Amin, who had passed out drunk after a boozy party.
✪ Exchange students report shocking placements
I’ve seen many things I don’t like, including students that had been sexually abused, photographed, and forced to drink alcohol, says Danielle Grijalva, She is the head of CSFES, an organization that helps exchange students who run into problems abroad. Only this past year, 10-12 Norwegian exchange students abroad contacted her for help.
✪ EPIC Request Reveals DHS Monitoring Social Media
A Freedom of Information Act has revealed the Department of Homeland Security awarded a contract in 2010 to General Dynamics’ Advanced Information Systems in order to provide constant surveillance of social media, according to The Washington Post. The Electronic Privacy Information Center filed the request, and according to a training manual that was among the documents they received, DHS engaged in monitoring comments on Facebook, Twitter and blogs to obtain public sentiment on a proposed transfer of Guantanamo Bay detainees to a town in Michigan. The $11 million contract awarded to General Dynamics is expected to produce “reports on DHS, Components, and other Federal Agencies: positive and negative reports on FEMA, CIA, CBP, ICE, etc. as well as organizations outside the DHS,”
✪ MLK strip club flyer: Graphic designer under fire for ‘I Have a Dream Bash’
When Martin Luther King Jr. said he had a dream, this likely wasn’t what he meant. A flyer promoting a Miami strip club’s “I Have a Dream Bash” featuring MLK holding wads of cash next to scantily-clad women has its creator taking plenty of flack. Miami Beach graphic designer Jeffrey Darnell Paul says he didn’t realize the flyer, made for The Office strip club at 250 Northeast 183rd Street, would generate the controversy it has. “I wasn’t trying to disrespect anybody… it wasn’t on my mind that it would escalate to something like this,” Paul told NBC Miami Monday. “It was just supposed to be a promotional thing, it wasn’t about disgracing Martin Luther King, it wasn’t about that.”
✪ Mom forces son to wear ‘I sell drugs’ sign
An Indiana mother forced her son to wear a sign around his neck listing his law-breaking behavior and stand on a Ft. Wayne street corner for two hours earlier this week. The sign read: “I lie, I steal, I sell drugs, I don’t follow the law.” CBS New York reports that Dynesha Lax thought the punishment police had given her son when he broke the law recently wasn’t strong enough to get him to stop his behavior, so she took matters into her own hands.

 

 

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on January 19, 2012

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Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando Larry King Interview 1994

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on November 28, 2011

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Now That’s What I Call Art ’11

  • “The manufacturer basically changed Oxy’s chemical compound (none of the actual drug was removed) by adding a substance that makes it really difficult for most people to abuse it. People were abusing the old drug by crushing the pills to snort them, dissolving them to inject, or chewing them to get a maximum high. So in many ways the new drug is good news, because it prevents stuff like that. The bad news is that in my opinion, whatever substance they added to it has dulled how well the medication works and how long it lasts.”

    “The new OxyContin OPs are supposedly in line with the old 80 mg pills. But since the new pills were introduced, the price of the older OC pills has jumped by a good solid 20%. People who have them might want to hold on to them if they can. They’re like antiques. You might make some good money off of them later!”

  • Our world is a place where information can behave like human genes and ideas can replicate, mutate and evolve
  • In yet another example of the Anti-Defamation League’s bizarre
    obsession with the Swastika, Nintendo has agreed to withdraw a
    Pokemon Trading card that bears a clock wise swastika.
    The Jewish Lobby declared that the card shows “insensativity to
    the feeling of Jews”.
  • Fake Nazi Helmet commercial from a rare film
  • Federal drug safety officials are warning consumers about counterfeit sex-enhancement pills that are sold as supplements but contain the drugs used in Viagra and another medication.

    The Food and Drug Administration said Friday that the fake “ExtenZe” pills, marketed to improve male sexual performance, contain tadalafil and sildenafil, the active ingredients in Cialis and Viagra. Both drugs require a doctor’s prescription.

    The FDA says the counterfeit product looks like ExtenZe, which is an herbal supplement. It says the counterfeit products are marked with lot numbers 1110075 and F050899.

  • You may think you understand how the Patriot Act allows the government to spy on its citizens. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) says it’s worse than you’ve heard.

    Congress is set to reauthorize three controversial provisions of the surveillance law as early as Thursday. But Wyden says that what Congress will renew is a mere fig leaf for a far broader legal interpretation of the Patriot Act that the government keeps to itself — entirely in secret. Worse, there are hints that the government uses this secret interpretation to gather what one Patriot-watcher calls a “dragnet” for massive amounts of information on private citizens; the government portrays its data-collection efforts much differently.

  • American Express cards may no longer be used to purchase medical marijuana. The company has given no reason for the prohibition. Other credit card companies so far continue to allow their cards to be used for the purchase of medical marijuana where legal.

    “I haven’t seen it (the prohibition) with other credit cards,” said Aaron Smith, executive director of the National Cannabis Industry Association.

    “I don’t understand why they would turn their back on a $2 billion industry. It’s perplexing.”

  • Here in NYC, when Hasidim attack, the violence is usually reduced to running goy cyclists off the road or fisticuffs over Satmar schisms. But up in Rockland County, it’s all HDP (Hasids Don’t Play). An orthodox Jewish father of four is currently hospitalized with third-degree burns over 50 percent of his body after another orthodox Jew allegedly tried to burn his house down—because he started taking his family to a different synagogue.
  • Lynn, aka Common, is known for a rap song titled “Song for Assata”, which essentially praises a black woman known as Assata Shakur, her real name is Joanne Chesimard, who is an escaped convicted murderer who was serving Life plus 26 to 30 years for the cold-blooded killing of New Jersey State Trooper Werner Foerster in 1973.

    In his rap song, Lynn paints Chesimard as a victim of the police and the system and portrays her as a hero, much in the same manner that Wesley Cook, aka Mumia Abu-Jamal, is praised by radical blacks and their ‘artists’ despite the fact that he too was convicted and sentenced to death for the murder a police officer, Daniel Faulkner of Philadelphia.

  • Everyone wishes they could turn back the clock sometimes, and it turns out Barack Obama is no different.

    He got the date wrong by three years when he signed the guestbook at Westminster Abbey today on his official visit to the UK – despite apparently asking the dean what day it was.

  • Sufferers include folk singer Joni Mitchell, who has complained of “this weird incurable disease that seems like it’s from outer space… Fibres in a variety of colours protrude out of my skin: they cannot be forensically identified as animal, vegetable or mineral. Morgellons is a slow, unpredictable killer – a terrorist disease. It will blow up one of your organs, leaving you in bed for a year.”
  • This is a story about a group of Americans you’ve likely never heard of: they’re called “sovereign citizens.” Many don’t pay taxes, carry a driver’s license or hold a Social Security card. They have little regard for the police or the courts, and some have become violent.

    The FBI lists them among the nation’s top domestic terror threats.

    By some estimates, there are as many as 300,000 sovereign citizens in the U.S. And with the sluggish economy and mortgage mess, their ranks are growing.

  • The National Security Agency is, by nature, an extreme example of the e-hoarder. And as the governmental organization responsible for things like, say, gathering intelligence on such Persons of Interest as Osama bin Laden, that impulse makes sense–though once you hear the specifics, it still seems pretty incredible. In a story about the bin Laden mission, the NSA very casually dropped a number: Every six hours, the agency collects as much data as is stored in the entire Library of Congress.

    That data includes transcripts of phone calls and in-house discussions, video and audio surveillance, and a massive amount of photography. “The volume of data they’re pulling in is huge,” said John V. Parachini, director of the Intelligence Policy Center at RAND. “One criticism we might make of our [intelligence] community is that we’re collection-obsessed — we pull in everything — and we don’t spend enough time or money to try and understand what do we have and how can we act upon it.”

  • Blame the flower children. That seems to be the chief conclusion of a new report about the Roman Catholic Church’s sexual abuse scandal. The study, undertaken by John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the request of America’s Catholic bishops, links the spike in child abuse by priests in the 1960s and ’70s to “the importance given to young people and popular culture” — along with the emergence of the feminist movement, a “singles culture” and a growing acceptance of homosexuality. It also cites crime, drugs, an increase in premarital sexual behavior and divorce.
  • Sex scandals have become a staple of media exploitation with personal morality plays trumping political morality confrontations every time.

    They are both great distractions and effective tools of character assassination which are often more effective than more violent ways to neutralize people considered dangerous.

    That’s why the FBI was so hot to discredit Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with leaks of so-called wiretapped sex tapes. In his case, this tactic failed but the other worked.

    In some cases both tactics are deployed as in the physical assassination of Bin Laden and then the character-killing aimed at his supporters through the release of porn allegedly found in his “lair.”

  • The Amondawa lacks the linguistic structures that relate time and space – as in our idea of, for example, “working through the night”.

    The study, in Language and Cognition, shows that while the Amondawa recognise events occuring in time, it does not exist as a separate concept.

    The idea is a controversial one, and further study will bear out if it is also true among other Amazon languages.

    The Amondawa were first contacted by the outside world in 1986, and now researchers from the University of Portsmouth and the Federal University of Rondonia in Brazil have begun to analyse the idea of time as it appears in Amondawa language.

    “We’re really not saying these are a ‘people without time’ or ‘outside time’,” said Chris Sinha, a professor of psychology of language at the University of Portsmouth.

  • Revolutionary: Bobby Seale
    Re-branded: Vanilla ice cream enthusiast. Seale, who co-founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense in the late 1960s, became a pitch man for Ben & Jerry’s in the early 1990s. In the ad Seale sports the Panther’s signature black beret while holding up a clenched fist in one hand and a serving of vanilla ice cream in the other. 

  • Ruth Schulz and her colleagues at the University of Queensland and Queensland University of Technology call their robots the Lingodroids. The robots consist of a mobile platform equipped with a camera, laser range finder, and sonar for mapping and obstacle avoidance. The robots also carry a microphone and speakers for audible communication between them.

    To understand the concept behind the project, consider a simplified case of how language might have developed. Let’s say that all of a sudden you wake up somewhere with your memory completely wiped, not knowing English, Klingon, or any other language. And then you meet some other person who’s in the exact same situation as you. What do you do?

  • “In everyday life you mostly use your left hand to touch things on the left side of the world, and your right hand for the right side of the world.

    “This means that the areas of the brain that contain the map of the right body and the map of right external space are usually activated together, leading to highly effective processing of sensory stimuli.

    “When you cross your arms these maps are not activated together anymore, leading to less effective brain processing of sensory stimuli, including pain, being perceived as weaker.”

  • A dog that wasn’t quite housebroken may have indirectly been responsible for a bomb scare at a New York courthouse.

    The trouble began Friday when 19-year-old Melvin Ruffin arrived at a court complex in Central Islip following a long bus ride from his home in Bellport.

    During the trip, another passenger’s Chihuahua urinated on his backpack.

    So, he stashed the wet bag in some bushes while he went inside to answer a disorderly conduct citation.

    But then a retired police officer saw the bag and alerted security.

    The bomb squad was ultimately called in. Officers used a robot to determine that the bag didn’t contain anything harmful.

  • Archaeologists digging for the remains of a 16th-century woman believed to be the model for Leonardo’s Mona Lisa masterpiece have found a crypt and a stairway to a probably second tomb inside a former medieval convent in central Florence.
  • My name is Captain Dan Nardiello of the US Marine corps (special) stationed in Pakistan, I found some money after the death of OBL I need someone to help me move it to a safer place, please have it in mind that there is no danger involved. You may contact me on usmc.12@blumail.org so that I can provide you with details.
  • Steven McCormack was standing on his truck’s foot plate Saturday when he slipped and fell, breaking a compressed air hose off an air reservoir that powered the truck’s brakes.

    He fell hard onto the brass fitting, which pierced his left buttock and started pumping air into his body.

    “I felt the air rush into my body and I felt like it was going to explode from my foot,” he told local media from his hospital bed in the town of Whakatane, on North Island’s east coast.

    “I was blowing up like a football,” he said. “I had no choice but just to lay there, blowing up like a balloon.”

  • Humans are pimply. It’s part of what sets us apart from the rest of the animal kingdom. While it’s true that some form of acne vulgaris affects other species—it’s been found in some Mexican hairless dogs and induced experimentally in rhino mice—acne is largely an affliction of our accursed species alone. (Somewhere between 85 and 100 percent of adolescents exhibit acne—and a significant minority of adults, too.) Why is the human animal so peculiar in its tendency to form volcanic comedones, papules, pustules, nodular abscesses, and, in some severe cases, lasting scars? According to evolutionary theorists Stephen Kellett and Paul Gilbert, we probably owe these unsavory blemishes to our having lost our apish pelts too rapidly for our own good.
  • It is an industry that blossomed in the oversize metal warehouses of old-line Oakland businesses. Established trucking, plumbing and construction companies, scrambling for work in a down economy, opened their doors to Ebyam’s cannabis farms, thought to be the largest in the city. His workers, mostly the bud-trimmers who assure the highest-quality medical marijuana, were organized by the Teamsters.

    But the failure of the statewide marijuana legalization initiative last fall, and subsequent threats from federal prosecutors, derailed the ambitious plan of city leaders to license four giant farms and thus make Oakland the legal cannabis capital of the country. And with the collapse of Oakland’s vision of marijuana supremacy came disaster for Ebyam.

    Ebyam is now locked in litigation over the $1.25 million sale of one of his growing operations, and another installation has been decimated by a string of suspicious burglaries — a fitting symbol, perhaps, of an industry that could have been.

  • Shell is making good on its promise to build the largest object ever to float on water, announcing Friday it would build the Prelude FLNG Project to harvest offshore natural gas fields. The gargantuan ship will suck up the equivalent of 110,000 barrels of oil per day.

    The floating liquified natural gas facility will dwarf the biggest warships, weighing in at 600,000 metric tons. By contrast, the U.S.’ next-generation Ford-class supercarrier will displace 101,000 metric tons of water. Shell says its ship will be able to withstand a category 5 typhoon.

    In some ways, it’s more of a mini-island than a ship, designed to be moored in the same spot off the northwest coast of Australia for 25 years. The facility will be one-third of a mile long — longer than five football fields laid end-to-end — and will contain 260,000 metric tons of steel, about five times the amount used to build the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

  • Jeffrey Catherine Jones, the fantasy artist who helped introduce fine art and illustration influences to comics in the ’70s and beyond, has died of complications from emphysema and bronchitis, according to numerous reports. She was 67.

    In the early 70s, then known just as Jeffrey, Jones helped form The Studio, a group of cartoonists/illustrators that included Mike Kaluta, Bernie Wrightson and Barry Windsor-Smith. Jones was known for her lyrical linework and ethereal paintings, which prompted Frazetta himself to say that Jones was “the world’s greatest living painter.” Although she produced the comics strip Idyll for National Lampoon in the ’70s, Jones was best known for her book covers, prints, and painting, with only a brief dabbling in comics.

  • The camera was disguised as a plastic coat hook and was affixed to a wall directly across from a toilet, officials said. A Starbucks employee discovered the device and called police, they said.

    Shortly after, authorities arrested Velasco, who downloaded the device about every hour to his laptop computer while sitting in his car, police said.

    Detectives confiscated his laptop and say they found video of at least 45 female victims, including children, using the restroom. It did not appear that any of the videos were uploaded to the Internet or distributed, they said.

  • Christie’s had a bumper night, tallying more than $300 million in sales. While not the priciest item up for auction that day, Cindy Sherman’s “Untitled #96” from 1981 passed all records for photography, and was sold for $3.89 million. According to ArtInfo.com, the buyer was New York dealer Philippe Segalot, and the underbidder was Per Skarstedt, also a New York dealer. Christie’s confirmed that this was a record for a photograph at auction, previously held by Andreas Gursky’s “99 Cent II Diptychon,” which fetched $3.35 million in 2006. Sherman recently had another high profile sale, with her work “Untitled #153,” from 1985 reaching $2.7 million in late 2010.
  • Lady Gaga is now demanding that photographers surrender the copyright of photos taken at her concerts – and photographers are incensed.
  • Fields of watermelons exploded when he and other agricultural workers in eastern China mistakenly applied forchlorfenuron, a growth accelerator. The incident has become a focus of a Chinese media drive to expose the lax farming practices, shortcuts and excessive use of fertiliser behind a rash of food safety scandals.

    It follows discoveries of the heavy metal cadmium in rice, toxic melamine in milk, arsenic in soy sauce, bleach in mushrooms, and the detergent borax in pork, added to make it resemble beef.

  • As we reported earlier today, the Department of Justice and the TSA used financial terrorism to nix HB 1937 in Texas, a bill that would have made it “A criminal act for security personnel to touch a person’s private areas without probable cause as a condition of travel or as a condition of entry into a public place,” shortly before the legislation looked to be on its way to passage in the Senate having passed the Texas House unanimously.

    The DOJ and Homeland Security intimidated lawmakers into dropping the bill after they threatened to shut down all the airports in Texas and prevent any commercial flights from operating out of or entering the state, a brazenly tyrannical tactic that proves the federal government is acting more like a mafia criminal enterprise than a body that is supposed to represent the interests of the American people.

  • Written in the blood from a victim’s severed leg, in Spanish: “What’s up, Otto Salguero, you bastard? We are going to find you and behead you, too. —Sincerely, Z200.”
  • Seventeen lost pyramids are among the buildings identified in a new satellite survey of Egypt.

    More than 1,000 tombs and 3,000 ancient settlements were also revealed by looking at infra-red images which show up underground buildings.

    Initial excavations have already confirmed some of the findings, including two suspected pyramids.

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File under Comics, Culture, Influences, Photography, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on May 26, 2011

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Nukes ‘n Nazis

  • A devastating earthquake strikes Japan. A massive tsunami kills thousands. Fears of a nuclear meltdown run rampant. Bloodshed and violence escalate in Libya.
    And U.S. companies selling doomsday bunkers are seeing sales skyrocket anywhere from 20% to 1,000%.
    Northwest Shelter Systems, which offers shelters ranging in price from $200,000 to $20 million, has seen sales surge 70% since the uprisings in the Middle East, with the Japanese earthquake only spurring further interest. In hard numbers, that’s 12 shelters already booked when the company normally sells four shelters per year.“Sales have gone through the roof, to the point where we are having trouble keeping up,” said Northwest Shelter Systems owner Kevin Thompson.

  • Himmler, who ran the modern industrial-scale murder programme of the Jews, was also spellbound by myths and legends all his life. He financed expeditions to far-flung corners of the earth by Indiana Jones-type S.S. men seeking proof of the supremacy of Ayran man – ie, the Germans.

    The skull, which weighs nearly 20lbs, is of the same design as the death’s head which adorned the uniforms of his killers. It was found in a wooden and leather box in the home of an old lady and it is now in the hands of Swiss journalist Luc Burgin.

    With it, it is claimed, was a list of 35 treasures which the S.S. was seeking to bring back to Germany from Sudetenland on the border with Czechoslovakia as the Reich crumbled in 1945. Part of it reads;”Nr. 14; the crystal skull – 263-2 RFSS Collection Rahn, No 25592, leather case, crystal death‘s head, South America.”

  • In the wake of the continuing nuclear tragedy in Japan, the United States government is still moving quickly to increase the amounts of radiation the population can “safely” absorb by raising the safe zone for exposure to levels designed to protect the government and nuclear industry more than human life. It’s all about cutting costs now as the infinite-growth paradigm sputters and moves towards extinction. As has been demonstrated by government conduct in the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of Deepwater Horizon and in Japan, life has taken a back seat to cost-cutting and public relations posturing.

    The game plan now appears to be to protect government and the nuclear industry from “excessive costs”… at any cost.

  • The world’s fourth-largest economy stands alone among leading industrialized nations in its decision to stop using nuclear energy because of its inherent risks. It is betting billions on expanding the use of renewable energy to meet power demands instead.

    The transition was supposed to happen slowly over the next 25 years, but is now being accelerated in the wake of Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant disaster, which Chancellor Angela Merkel has called a “catastrophe of apocalyptic dimensions.”

  • Researchers at a Canadian university are using nanotechnology and a tiny remote-controlled magnetic sphere to deliver cancer-fighting drugs directly to where they need to go.

    A scientific team at the Polytechnique Montral, one of Canada’s leading engineering schools, reported this week that they were able guide microcarriers through a live animal’s blood stream and deposit anti-cancer medicine directly on a targeted area on the animal’s liver.

    The carriers, made out of magnetic nanoparticles and biodegradable polymer, can be basically driven through arteries using a remote controlled device.

  • It’s possible that the family tree of all life on Earth has its roots on Mars — and a new device could put that theory to the test in a few years, researchers say.

    Researchers are developing an instrument that would search through samples of Martian dirt, isolating any genetic material from microbes that might be present — bugs that are living or that died relatively recently, within the last million years or so. Scientists could then use standard biochemical techniques to analyze any resulting genetic sequences, comparing them to what we find on Earth.

    “It’s a long shot,” said MIT researcher Chris Carr, who’s working on the life-detecting device, in a statement. “But if we go to Mars and find life that’s related to us, we could have originated on Mars. Or if it started here, it could have been transferred to Mars.”

  • A drug-resistant bacterium that has surfaced in Southern California has mostly spread in nursing homes, not hospitals, but more needs to be done to track it, health officials said Thursday.

    More than 350 cases of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, or CRKP, have been reported at healthcare facilities in Los Angeles County, mostly among elderly patients at skilled-nursing and long-term care facilities, according to a study by Dr. Dawn Terashita, an epidemiologist with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

  • For years, so many twins have been born in the small southern Brazilian town of Cândido Godói that residents wonder whether something mysterious lurks in the water, or even if Josef Mengele, the Nazi physician known as the Angel of Death, conducted experiments on the women there.
  • How two American kids became big-time weapons traders — until the Pentagon turned on them
  • Authorities in Pennsylvania arrested a 27-year-old woman who they say hid more than 100 items — including 54 bags of heroin and loose change — in her vagina.
  • The owner of the Hitler’s Den pool hall in central India is refusing to change the name despite objections from the Israeli Embassy and a Jewish group.

    “There is no way we will change the name,” owner Baljeet Ghosal told the Times of India. “We have been operating under this name since 2006 and now opened another one in Laxmi Nagar under the same banner. It is our identity.”

    Ghosal told the newspaper that he was looking for a “different-sounding name.” He also told the newspaper that people in Nagpur are not aware of Hitler’s atrocities against the Jews.

    “No one has raised any objection yet,” he told the Times of India.

  • An American who drugged her investment banker-husband with a milkshake and bludgeoned him to death more than seven years ago was convicted of murder Friday at her second trial in a case that grabbed world attention with lurid details on the breakdown of a wealthy expatriate marriage in Hong Kong.

    The unanimous verdict and automatic life sentence match the outcome of the first trial against Nancy Kissel, whose lawyers argued she was a battered, clinically depressed wife who acted under diminished responsibility when her husband provoked her attack.

  • A man with ties to the white supremacist movement was arrested and charged Wednesday in the foiled bombing of a Martin Luther King Day parade in this city last January.
  • Members filled their Gwalia Housing Association homes with ancient Egyptian idolatry, held ceremonies in robes and hoods and forced a number of children and vulnerable adults into depraved sex acts.
  • “A Long Island cop was shot in the face and killed by an MTA officer after a knife-wielding, self-proclaimed Satanist lunged at police and was gunned down in his home Saturday, sources said.”

    Brian Mullins, a 12-year-old eyewitness, recounted to police that DiGeronimo stared at him, “murderous-looking eyes” that were “staring into his soul” as he freakishly paraded down the streets of his neighborhood, knife in hand.

    Police, including an MTA office that lived nearby, corned DiGeronimo in a rear bedroom of his home after neighbors called police. Instead of dropping his weapon, Anthony lunged at police, resulting in officers executing the disturbed Satanist in the bedroom.

    That’s when the real tragedy began.

    “After the shooting, a Nassau County special operations cop stepped into the home. An MTA officer, standing near the door, saw the gun and shot the cop in the face.”

  • Medical records of Dr. Bruce Ivins, blamed by the FBI for the deadly 2001 anthrax mail attacks, “support the Justice Department’s determination that he was responsible,” a panel of behavioral experts and psychiatrists contended in a newly released report.

    “Dr. Ivins was psychologically disposed to undertake the mailings, his behavioral history demonstrated his potential for carrying them out, and he had the motivation and the means,” they said in a report made public Wednesday.

    Letters containing powdered anthrax were sent to news organizations and two US senators in late 2001, infecting 22 people who received or handled them, five of whom died. Ivins, a civilian researcher at the US Army’s Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Maryland, committed suicide in July 2008 as the FBI was preparing to accuse him of preparing and mailing the letters. He was never charged.

  • As a Portland-based rock band with a growing fan base and national ambitions, the Slants figured it wouldn’t hurt to take care of some business interests. On the advice of their attorney, they decided to register their name through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Protect the brand. It seemed simple enough.

    “It didn’t occur to us at the time that there would be an issue with the name,” says Simon Tam, the band’s manager and bass player, who performs under the name Simon Young. As a band of Asian Americans who play to a fan base with a high percentage of Asian Americans why would they anticipate a problem?

    One year, two rejections and a case file closing in on 200 pages later, it’s clear there is an issue with the name. That issue is Section 2(a) of the 1946 Trademark Act. It says, in part, that a trademark can be rejected if it “consists of or comprises immoral, deceptive, or scandalous matter; or matter which may disparage …”

  • Malte Spitz, recently learned, we are already continually being tracked whether we volunteer to be or not. Cellphone companies do not typically divulge how much information they collect, so Mr. Spitz went to court to find out exactly what his cellphone company, Deutsche Telekom, knew about his whereabouts.

    The results were astounding. In a six-month period — from Aug 31, 2009, to Feb. 28, 2010, Deutsche Telekom had recorded and saved his longitude and latitude coordinates more than 35,000 times. It traced him from a train on the way to Erlangen at the start through to that last night, when he was home in Berlin.

    Mr. Spitz has provided a rare glimpse — an unprecedented one, privacy experts say — of what is being collected as we walk around with our phones. Unlike many online services and Web sites that must send “cookies” to a user’s computer to try to link its traffic to a specific person, cellphone companies simply have to sit back and hit “record.”

  • One sign of possible deterioration in the plant itself came at Reactor No. 3. Workers who were trying to connect an electrical cable to a pump in a turbine building next to the reactor were injured when they stepped into water that was found to be significantly more radioactive than normal. On Friday, officials and experts offered conflicting explanations of what had gone wrong — but all pointed to greater damage to the reactor’s systems and more contamination there than officials had indicated earlier.

    Two workers were exposed to radiation and burned when water poured over their boots and down around their feet and ankles, officials said. A third worker was wearing higher boots and did not suffer the same exposure.

    Like the injured workers, many of those risking their lives are subcontractors of Tokyo Electric Power, who are paid a small daily wage for hours of work in dangerous conditions. In some cases they are poorly equipped and trained for their task.

  • Fukushima is like a cancer eating away at the habitat of the east coast of Japan. Whilst the situation appears to be stable, a number of slow burning processes must inevitably be eating away at the heart of these reactors. The solution to a number of these problems is to restore fresh water circulation to each of the cores and the spent fuel ponds. Whether or not the pumping systems work remains to be seen. Disposing of the salty radioactive sludge from inside the reactor vessels presents another major challenge.

    It seems possible that the current meta stable condition may persist for many more weeks, and all the while the release and accumulation of radioactive isotopes in the environment will continue. And there is still risk of a catastrophic failure due to heat or corrosion that would result in the status degrading rapidly. It is too early to call this crisis over.

  • A high-level radiation leak detected Thursday at one of six troubled reactors at the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant indicates possible damage to the reactor’s vessel, pipes or valves, the government’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said Friday.

    Three workers at the No. 3 reactor’s turbine building, connected to the reactor building, were exposed Thursday to water containing radioactive materials 10,000 times the normal level, with two of them taken to hospital due to possible radiation burns to their feet, the plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said.

    Hidehiko Nishiyama, spokesman for the governmental nuclear regulatory body, told a press conference, ”At present, our monitoring data suggest the (No. 3) reactor retains certain containment functions, but there is a good chance that the reactor has been damaged.”

  • “We think rolling out these kind of invasive measures is really another step toward mass surveillance of the population,” Calabrese told Raw Story. “I mean, now if you’re just walking around on the street, do you think that automatically police should be able to check your fingerprint? Seems very invasive to us.”

    But it’s more than just invasive, he suggested: it’s a fundamental revolution in American values.

    “Facial recognition is one of the most invasive biometrics because it allows surreptitious tracking at a distance,” Calabrese continued. “They can secretly track you from camera to camera, location to location. That has enormous implications, not just for security but also for American society. I mean, we are now at a point where we can automatically track people. Computers could do that. That’s what, we think, is a grave danger to our privacy.”

  • As workers race to stave off further melting at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors in Japan, several robots there are waiting on the sidelines for an opportunity to help. Questions remain, however, regarding how these units might assist in an ongoing emergency at a site contaminated with radiation and deluged with tons of corrosive seawater.
  • Although charged with the possession of six plus ounces of weed, Nelson will please guilty to possessing just over three thanks to Hudspeth County Attorney C.R. “Kit” Bramblett, who openly calls Nelson his “favorite artist.”

    Speaking to reporter Sterry Butcher at The Big Bend Sentinel newspaper, Bramblett, now 78, confessed that he’d admired Nelson all his life. He even joked that they’d maybe helped Willie out a bit.

    “Between me and the sheriff, we threw out enough of it or smoked enough so that there’s only three ounces, which is within my jurisdiction,” he quipped, before explaining that the extra weight was actually due to excessive packaging.

    If that’s indeed the case, Willie isn’t actually getting special treatment. In fact, most misdemeanor possession cases that draw a guilty plea are handled by mail.

    With the official charge now reduced to a misdemeanor, he’ll be ordered to pay a $100 fine and $278 in court fees.

  • A blurred portrait is visible in the controversial photos of Adolf Hitler’s “doppelganger suicide.” In the picture above on the left, the out of focus portrait was placed directly onto the corpse. In the Russian movie footage frame on the right, the blurred portrait appears as a prop in the background. This change of position invites serious speculation that the body may also have been moved, switched, or meddled with between photos.
  • During World War II the leaders of the Axis powers (Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and Emperor Hirohito) were sometimes depicted by Allied “black” propagandists as monsters. Black propaganda purports to emanate from a source other than the true one. This type of propaganda is associated with covert psychological operations. The enemy leaders were caricatured as gorillas, skeletons, rats, or whatever the Allied “psywarriors” could dream up. This was all part of the process of wartime depersonalization, the destruction of an individual as a human being and the resultant new image of him as vermin good only for killing.
  • RABIDLY ANTI-NAZI
    PRE-WAR AMERICAN
    PHOTO BOOK 1939
    “HITLER DOOMED TO DIE” Nazi dagger, Nazi baby
    Nazi atrocities
    This is a very historic piece of American pre-war literature called HITLER DOOMED TO DIE and was published in 1939 without the name of either the author or the publisher! The perfect bound 8-1/2 x 11-1/8 inch, very heavily illustrated, 98 page softbound book claims to tell the story of the life and crimes of Adolf Hitler, Hermann Göring, Dr. Joseph Goebbels, Heinrich Himmler and other top Nazis in text and photos.

    In chapters such as “Sexual Pervert”, “Hitler – Illegitimate? A Jew?”, “A German-Jew’s Story”, “Vienna’s Flophouse Fuehrer”, “Concentration Camp Horrors”, etc., the book explains that Hitler as a toddler was found “…pulling the wings off flies or spread-eagling the frogs that he caught in the garden…” and when he was four years old he was found “…chewing a field mouse he caught and dismembered.” It gets worse.

  • As we’ve been watching the conflict in Libya play out exactly like the war in Iraq, and being keen to their tricks and tactics, we began examining pictures, videos and other evidence to lead us to the conclusion that this entire ordeal is a CIA-backed coup. We believe there is actually very little conflict (if any) aside from the false flags perpetuated by the CIA/MI6/MOSSAD in a UN takeover of the region. Considering the internet blackout disabling the people’s ability to speak, Russia Today’s interviews with the people of Libya, and the great oracle John McCain’s prophecy that Gaddofi will bomb his own oil reserves, a clearer picture began to form.
  • Video shows the store in disarray, a mannequin wearing a “Not Violence” t-shirt was knocked to the ground and lost it’s head, a gift card display was knocked over and pieces of a woman’s hair weave were strewn on the floor.
  • Better than Electric Car – 258 miles/gallon: IPO 2010 in Shanghai

    This is a single seated car

    From conception to production: 3 years and the company is headquartered in Hamburg , Germany

    Will be selling for 4000 yuan, equivalent to US$600

    Gas tank capacity = 1.7 gallons

    Speed = 62 – 74.6 Miles/hour

    Fuel efficiency = 258 miles/gallon

    Travel distance with a full tank = 404 miles

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on March 26, 2011

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Second Grade Schoolroom Sexcapades

    • A former San Antonio police officer accused of raping a transsexual prostitute while on duty was ordered Tuesday to spend a year in jail.

      Attorneys for Craig Nash, 39, had asked state District Judge Lori Valenzuela for deferred adjudication probation during the brief sentencing hearing, pointing out that he otherwise had been commended for his service during his six years with the department.

      Prosecutors sought the maximum one-year sentence for the official oppression charge, which is a Class A misdemeanor.

      As part of a plea agreement, Nash waived an indictment last month and pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor. In exchange, prosecutors agreed not to pursue a felony charge of sexual assault by a police officer, which had a maximum sentence of life in prison.

    • Thanks Billoney
    • After nine years of billions of dollars in “aid,” they said, that money has gone to silence people and to create a culture of dependence among the hungry, and yet poverty is up to 42% now. The International Committee of the Red Cross says that Afghanistan is the worst it’s been in 30 years (about as long, I might add, as we’ve been helping them out). A report from 29 NGOs, they pointed out, called “Nowhere to Turn,” found that there seems to be no end in sight to the night raids and arming of militias.

      To the argument that the Taliban would be worse, they pointed out that the war is leading many to join and call themselves the Taliban in order to fight the foreigners and are thereby being radicalized. What’s not being addressed, they said, are the roots of terrorism: poverty, hate, revenge, anger, and the lack of meaningful relationships between peoples.

    • In his last months, King was organizing the most militant project of his life: the Poor People’s Campaign. He crisscrossed the country to assemble “a multiracial army of the poor” that would descend on Washington–engaging in nonviolent civil disobedience at the Capitol, if need be–until Congress enacted a poor people’s bill of rights. Reader’s Digest warned of an “insurrection.”

      King’s economic bill of rights called for massive government jobs programs to rebuild America’s cities. He saw a crying need to confront a Congress that had demonstrated its “hostility to the poor”–appropriating “military funds with alacrity and generosity,” but providing “poverty funds with miserliness.”

      How familiar that sounds today, more than a quarter-century after King’s efforts on behalf of the poor people’s mobilization were cut short by an assassin’s bullet.

    • Austrian authorities are searching for a bank robber who uses an unusual disguise: He wears a Barack Obama mask during his holdups.
    • “Sure, I could imagine a scenario where you mix rabies with a flu virus to get airborne transmission, a measles virus to get personality changes, the encephalitis virus to cook your brain with fever”—and thus increase aggression even further—”and throw in the ebola virus to cause you to bleed from your guts. Combine all these things, and you’ll [get] something like a zombie virus,” she said
    • He recalls, “George Lucas sits down and seriously proceeds to talk for around 25 minutes about how he thinks the world is gonna end in the year 2012, like, for real. He thinks it.

      “He’s going on about the tectonic plates and all the time Spielberg is, like, rolling his eyes, like, ’My nerdy friend won’t shut up, I’m sorry…’

    • “According to the allegation, the first incident involved several students who undressed, at least partially, while acting disruptively in the classroom,” the letter read, according to KRON. “The second incident concerned two students who engaged in sexually explicit behavior, also in the classroom.”

      Local media reported that in the second incident, a boy and a girl — both second-graders — performed oral sex on each other. Both incidents occurred in the same classroom, and the teacher is believed to have been present at the time, Flint said. He said the teacher is not accused of taking part in or orchestrating the incidents.

      “He’s saying he has no knowledge of the reports and we have to square these different stories and see how we can reconcile them,” Flint told KGO, the ABC station in San Francisco.

      “Our early findings don’t indicate that anyone was coerced or forced into these acts. We do think it involved curiosity,” Flint said.

    • It’s been described as Israel’s ‘big ears’. A huge facility where it’s claimed phone calls and e-mails from all across the Middle East and beyond, can be monitored for intelligence. Hidden from prying eyes for decades in the desert, it’s become a focus for investigative journalists.
    • Nowadays, this wall at Bowery and East Houston St. is one of the city’s more high-profile showcases for street art — though to purists, it’s completely commercialized. Last spring, amid much hoopla, Shepard Fairey of Obama “HOPE” poster fame, threw up a wheat-paste work at the site, only to see graffiti heads savagely mutilate it.

      But back in 1990, when Clayton Patterson created the mural at right, the wall had sat quietly, painted all white, for several years.

      “Keith Haring kind of turned it on in the early 1980’s, when he did that big orange day-glo that just lit that corner up,” Patterson recalled. There were a few other murals after Haring’s, but then the concrete was cordoned off behind a chain-link fence.

    • I bought some of the new diet Mountain Dew at the store. I was checking the label and noticed at the bottom of the ingredients list it reads PHENYLKETONURICS: CONTAINS PHENYLALANINE.

      Ok, so what does this mean? First of all phenylalanine, is sold for its reputed analgesic and antidepressant effects.

      What is an analgesic? Analgesic is another word for a painkiller.The drug effects your peripheral and central nervous system. This is the same class of drugs that contains opiates such as morphine and opium. This is heavy stuff for modern day Mountain Dew?

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    Tearz For Fearz

    • If someone admits to a federal official that he’s used illegal drugs, that information should be sent to the FBI so that person can be disqualified from purchasing a gun, Sen. Chuck Schumer said Sunday.

      Noting that the alleged shooter in the Tucson massacre had admitted to military recruiters that he had used drugs on several occasions, Schumer said he is proposing to the Justice Department and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives that the military be required to notify federal officials about such admissions. The New York Democrat said such a process does not require new legislation.

    • The more one researches mind control, the more one will come to the conclusion that there is a coordinated script that has been in place for a very long time with the goal to turn the human race into non-thinking automatons. For as long as man has pursued power over the masses, mind control has been orchestrated by those who study human behavior in order to bend large populations to the will of a small “elite” group. Today, we have entered a perilous phase where mind control has taken on a physical, scientific dimension that threatens to become a permanent state if we do not become aware of the tools at the disposal of the technocratic dictatorship unfolding on a worldwide scale.
    • Police in Tunisia arrested a group of nine Swedish boar hunters travelling in taxis to a nearby hotel on Sunday after their flight home was cancelled. The hunters came to Tunisia a week ago to hunt wild boar in the Kasserine region and were supposed to return to Sweden on Sunday. When their flight was cancelled, they decided to take taxis from airport and find a hotel in the centre of Tunis, the capital. One of the Swedes, Ove Oberg, told reporters that the police roughed the men up and accused them of being terrorists.
    • The planet’s rising temperatures mean California is at greater risk of a “superstorm” that could flood the state’s Central Valley, causing damage that would dwarf even a major earthquake, scientists have warned.
    • At the fried chicken spot.
    • My thoughts alternated between excitement and revulsion. Fearing a highly visible scar, I squeezed the “bite” and the tiny maggot popped out like a zit. So much for that.

      The next day, I noticed a now familiar movement in the upper, right rear portion of my head. This area was well concealed by hair and I thought even if this things takes a big hunk of flesh, no one will see it unless I become extraordinarily bald (so far this prognostication has held, if only just barely,…). Could I nurture my guest to pupation? As a male I thought this is probably the only opportunity I will ever have for another organism nourish itself on my living flesh. I imagined the movements of the maggot in my head were analogous to the kicking that pregnant women feel from their developing fetuses. It was thrilling, humbling, and a little alarming to suddenly be a link in the food chain rather than its terminal end.

    • Unfortunately, while some may applaud a Chinese initiative to spend the money that Wal-Mart sends them on a weapon of dubious utility, we too may end up paying a price, as the “threat” of China’s J-20 is invoked to justify further increases in our own obscenely bloated defense budget.
    • “They are a special interest. End of story,” LePage said of the NAACP, according to Maine news station WCSH6. “And I’m not going to be held hostage by special interests. And if they want, they can look at my family picture. My son happens to be black, so they can do whatever they’d like about it.”

      Pressed by reporters on his reasons, the tea party-backed governor added: “Tell ’em to kiss my butt. If they want to play the race card, come to dinner and my son will talk to them.”

    • Your home address and phone number are now part of the information dump third-party developers can obtain through Facebook-powered Website logins and applications.

      A new policy lets you authorize applications such as Facebook games and quizzes, and Websites that you log into with your Facebook ID access some of your most personal Facebook data. Facebook announced the changes in a developer blog post on Friday.

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