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Charles Manson Superstar (1989)

Charles Manson Superstar is a documentary film about Charles Manson, directed by Nikolas Schreck in 1989. Most of the documentary (the entire interview) was filmed inside San Quentin Prison. Schreck narrated the segments while images were shown, and music played in the background. There was brief footage of Spahn Ranch, and a short clip of James M. Mason being interviewed about the Universal Order, and Manson. Olivier Messiaen‘s “Death and Resurrection,” Bobby Beausoleil‘s “Lucifer Rising,” Krzysztof Penderecki‘s “Apocalypsis,” and Anton La Vey‘s “The Satanic Mass,” and Manson’s own songs “Clang Bang Clang” and “Mechanical Man” from the album LIE The Love and Terror Cult, were played during the film.

 

 

For forty years, Charles Manson has survived most of his life in what he calls ‘the hallways of the all ways,’ the reform schools, jails and prisons that have been his home and tomb. His thought was born in the hole of solitary confinement, apart from time and beyond the grasp of society. In his cell, he created his own world and speaks his own language: he has concluded that there is only the mind. This DVD will relinquish to you the extreme story of the killer of all killers: Charles Manson. From convincing his followers to move into the desert to train for the apocalypse, to leading a murderous crew through a string of devilish murders, you will see and hear from Manson himself of how he created a preconceived terror based on his philosophy of life. Manson claims that the so-called ‘straight’ world outside of prison is but an inverted reflection of the underworld in which he has lived. To him, the reality that presidents and law-abiding citizens accept begins in the hermetic alternate universe of criminals, cons and outlaws. Much as simplistic historians have dismissed Hitler’s 3rd Reich as the overcompensation of a failed artist, Manson’s vision of a holy war has been generally categorized as nothing more than the jealous rage of a spurned musician.

 

File under Cult Movies, Cults, Kooky Characters, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex

Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones (1980) TV Movie – Drink The Kool-Aid

In this made for TV movie, Powers Boothe plays the infamous leader of the “People’s Temple Cult,” Jim Jones. 1,000 followers give away their life savings to live with the cult in Guyana. When the illegal activities of Jones and his higher ups becomes known and investigators began searching the property, Jones decides to take himself and his followers on the fast track to heaven by staging the largest mass suicide in history. This film depicts Jones’ maniacal worldview and tragic end in graphic fashion. Boothe’s performance as Jones has long been revered as his absolute best, and the supporting cast, made up of such veterans as Ned Beatty, Randy Quaid and James Earl Jones, are equally good.

The film draws on Guyana Massacre: The Eyewitness Account and reports from The Washington Post at the time, to describe the life of Jim Jones from a 1960s idealist to the November 1978 mass murder/suicide of members of Peoples Temple in Jonestown, Guyana. In the beginning of the film, Jim Jones is seen helping minorities and working against racism. Later, after a move to San Francisco and increased power and attention, Jones becomes focused on his belief in nuclear holocaust, and moves hundreds of his followers to Guyana. Congressman Leo J. Ryan is notified that some individuals are being held against their will, and after going to investigate, the Guyana tragedy itself is depicted.

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File under Blast From The Past, Cult Movies, Cults, Fashion, Re¢e$$ion $pe¢iaL, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Trash TV