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REVOLUTION (1968) Hippie Documentary Haight Ashbury LSD 60′s San Francisco Scene

A documentary that explores the counterculture of San Francisco in the mid-1960′s

The sex is free. The pot is cheap. Everyone can afford the acid.

Revolution 1968
Peace, love and groovy, mind-altering drugs are the topics at hand in this San Francisco freak-out documentary. It’s a crude but heartfelt time capsule, released in the summer of ’68, just before the Haight Asbury scene turned into one big, unwashed bummer. And even if director Jack O’Connell (THE GREENWICH VILLAGE STORY, SWEDISH FLY GIRLS) may not have made a great movie, he was at the right time, at the right place, and (most important) with the right tripped-out attitude… Much of the movie is random footage of the hippie phenomenon, while a cute, blond, 20-year-old runaway named “Today Malone” provides a (slight) framework to this ragged mess. And a bigger bunch of long-haired, wide-eyed freaks I’ve never seen — crammed shoulder-to-shoulder, celebrating the summer solstice in the Golden Gate Park. God, the stench of patchouli must’ve been nauseating!

revolution 1968

Bands blast away, hippie chicks spin in circles, the lightshow begins, and it’s the same old acid haze we’ve come to know and love. Along the way, some interesting tidbits sneak in, including firsthand tales of getting busted, posted notes to runaway children, Ms. Malone unsuccessfully begging passers-by for spare change, a middle-aged nun describing how she’s similar to these “hippie girls,” and a typical hairball asked if he worries about chromosome damage from too much acid (when it’s, obviously, already too late). Of course, what movie about drugs is complete without a few suited “experts” (including San Francisco’s Director of Public Health and the thick-necked Chief of Police) warning about the evils of this new generation’s chemical dependence. But in the long run, this is a refreshingly pro-drug, pro-hippie pic that pushes the joys of LSD when Today doses on camera, and flies off on its mind-altering effects (actually, all they do is sit around a room, rolling their eyes and feeling a peach).

revolution 1968

The filmmakers have all the bases covered. They document the oddest niches of Hippiedom, which appeals to the curious. There are plenty of groovy visuals, in case you’re dosed. They even toss in some nude performance art to suck in the T&A crowd. It also features ragamuffin fashion at its worst (not as ratty as today’s Squatter Chic look, but close), plus music by Country Joe and The Fish, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and The Steve Miller Band… Nowadays, this nonsense is impossible to watch without laughing at these naive, burnt-out rebels, and it’s a reality check for folks who think the hippie subculture was exactly like PSYCH-OUT or THE TRIP. Unfortunately, real life was a lot less charismatic than reel life. And whenever one these wide-eyed innocents vows they’ll never conform to The System, I’ll give you odds that nowadays, they’re somewhere in suburbia, selling Amway products and falling asleep to AMERICA’S FUNNIEST HOME VIDEOS.

-Shock Cinema

revolution 1968

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Myrtle Corbin The Four Legged Girl

 

 

Josephene Myrtle Corbin, the Four-Legged Woman, was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee in 1868. Rather than having a parasitic twin, Myrtle’s extra legs resulted from an even rarer form of conjoined twinning known as dipygus, which gave her two complete bodies from the waist down. She had two small pelves side-by-side, and each of her smaller inner legs was paired with one of her outer legs. She could move the smaller legs but was unable to use them for walking. At the age of 19, she married a doctor named Clinton Bicknell and had four daughters and a son. It has been said that three of her children were born from one set of organs, two from the other. Myrtle died on May 6, 1928.

From Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine by George M. Gould and Walter L. Pyle:

Wells a describes Mrs. B., aged twenty, still alive and healthy. The duplication in this case begins just above the waist, the spinal column dividing at the third lumbar vertebra, below this point everything being double. Micturition and defecation occur at different times, but menstruation occurs simultaneously. She was married at nineteen, and became pregnant a year later on the left side, but abortion was induced at the fourth month on account of persistent nausea and the expectation of impossible delivery. Whaley, in speaking of this case, said Mrs. B. utilized her outside legs for walking; he also remarks that when he informed her that she was pregnant on the left side she replied, “I think you are mistaken; if it had been on my right side I would come nearer believing it;”–and after further questioning he found, from the patient’s observation, that her right genitals were almost invariably used for coitus.

(the name Mrs. B. refers to Myrtle’s married name, Bicknell.)

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Goin’ Hog Wild

  • Nick said: “We were stunned.

    “I thought, ‘My God what is it?’ It’s like nothing we have ever seen – it almost looks prehistoric.”

    The couple, who were walking their dogs at Bridge of Don, Aberdeen, called coastguards to investigate.

  • BHOPAL: This real life incident has the making of a scene from some vampire movie. A 22-year-old woman in Damoh district of Madhya Pradesh has told the police that her husband drank her blood for the past three years. “He used to take a syringe and draw blood from my arms,” Deepa Ahirwar said. “He would then empty it in a glass and drink it. For three years he did this on a regular basis, threatening me of dire consequences if I revealed this to anyone.”
  • According to the lawsuit, Dr. Anthony Pickett performed the circumcision on the boy, now 8, at the Maternity Center of Vermont on Jan. 3, 2003. Pickett used a Miltex Mogen clamp that removed 85 percent of the top of the boy’s penis, according to the suit.

    “Because of the defective design of the circumcision clamp, there was no protection for the head of the penis and Dr. Pickett was unable to visualize the (head) when excising the foreskin,” according to the plaintiffs’ court papers filed regarding the settlement. “For this reason, an amputation to the (head) of plaintiff’s penis occurred.”

  • Owning yeast and sugar isn’t enough to get you arrested in most places. But in some communities of rural Alaska, the high rate of alcohol abuse has caused voters to ban booze along with possession of the supplies to make it at home.

    A recent case highlights a 2007 state law that makes it illegal for a person to possess yeast and sugar in a local option community if they intend to use the ingredients to make home-brew, a cloudy, intoxicating liquid often mixed with fruit juice. Villages have the option to ban booze as one way to combat to a longstanding epidemic of alcohol-related injuries and deaths in rural Alaska.

  • A Japanese rock musician who tried to hang himself after being arrested for unruly behaviour on a flight to the Mariana Islands has died in hospital, reports say.

    Rocker Taiji Sawada, who was best known as the former bass player with heavy metal group “X”, died yesterday when medics at Saipan’s Commonwealth Health Centre turned off his life support, the Saipan Tribune reported.

    The Marianas Variety newspaper reported that Sawada, 45, had been in intensive care since July 14 after he tried to hang himself with a bedsheet in a jail in the US-administered Pacific territory.

    He had been arrested three days before for allegedly assaulting a female cabin crew attendant during a Delta Airlines flight from Tokyo to Saipan, court documents showed.

  • After 15 years of market growth…[dealers] were finding it harder to sell drugs, as pay cuts, tax rises and job losses left recreational users with less money. The Irish gangs were unable to shift larger hauls and, in any case, lacked the resources to buy in bulk, so they were ordering smaller quantities. This liquidity crisis was an unfamiliar problem for criminals used to having a river of money at their disposal.

    User arrests are down by 20% in recent years and the value of drugs seized—used as a proxy for market size—has hit 15-year lows. This demand elasticity is evident in both hard and soft drug markets: the value of cocaine seized last year is less than half that of previous years, marijuana’s a tenth of its 2006 peak. Even heroin junkies have economised; the value of seized heroin has fallen more than 85% since 2008.

  • Eight illegal immigrants from Mexico were arrested on drug trafficking charges after federal and Las Vegas law enforcement officials seized 212 pounds of drugs worth an estimated street value of $5.7 million in the largest methamphetamine bust in Nevada history, authorities announced Thursday.

    Police also seized $280,000 in cash, six guns and nine vehicles used for drug trafficking after searching nine residential properties in Las Vegas and Henderson on Tuesday.

    Law enforcement officials heralded the record bust as a significant blow to Las Vegas’ illegal underground that would be felt by every player, including drug bosses, small-time dealers and users hoping to score on the street. The raid yielded four pounds of heroin and 208 pounds of methamphetamine in varying stages of processing, from its liquid form to the crystal-like pieces sold on the street in small quantities for consumption.

  • There was a time when a mushroom cloud billowing over the Nevada desert was celebrated as a symbol of American strength — and, about 75 miles southeast in Las Vegas, as a terrific tourist draw.

    In the 1950s, casinos threw “dawn parties,” where gamblers caroused until a flash signaled the explosion of an atomic bomb at the Nevada Test Site. Tourism boosters promoted the Atomic Cocktail (vodka, brandy, champagne and a dash of sherry) and pinups such as Miss Atomic Blast, who was said to radiate “loveliness instead of deadly atomic particles.”

    Sixty years after the first atmospheric tests here, the 1,375-square-mile site continues to be a tourist magnet, though of a far different nature. Thousands of people each year sign up months in advance to see what is essentially a radioactive ghost town.

  • If your heritage is non-African, you are part Neanderthal, according to a new study in the July issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution. Discovery News has been reporting on human/Neanderthal interbreeding for some time now, so this latest research confirms earlier findings.

    Damian Labuda of the University of Montreal’s Department of Pediatrics and the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center conducted the study with his colleagues. They determined some of the human X chromosome originates from Neanderthals, but only in people of non-African heritage.

    “This confirms recent findings suggesting that the two populations interbred,” Labuda was quoted as saying in a press release. His team believes most, if not all, of the interbreeding took place in the Middle East, while modern humans were migrating out of Africa and spreading to other regions.

  • Some close to Bachmann fear she won’t be equal to the stress of the campaign, much less the presidency itself.

    “When she gets ‘em, frankly, she can’t function at all. It’s not like a little thing with a couple Advils. It’s bad,” the adviser says. “The migraines are so bad and so intense, she carries and takes all sorts of pills. Prevention pills. Pills during the migraine. Pills after the migraine, to keep them under control. She has to take these pills wherever she goes.”

    To staff, Bachmann has implausibly blamed the headaches on uncomfortable high-heel shoes, but those who have worked closely with her cite stress, a busy schedule and anything going badly for Bachmann as causes.

  • “I have to say, marijuana saved my life,” Lynx told me. “I would probably be dead if I didn’t have it.” She discovered pot while recovering from her cancer treatments. She’d been prescribed morphine and OxyContin, which she quit cold turkey. One day when she was having a bout of nausea, a friend offered her a toke. She was reluctant at first. The girls’ biological father had been “a druggie” when they were young, Lynx said.

    But the drug worked wonders, and soon Lynx became one of the first five minors to get a medical marijuana card in Montana. Now Lamb has one, too.

    Pot has also helped the twins rekindle the creative impulses they once channeled into their music. They’ve both taken up painting — astrological themes, mostly — and Lynx restores furniture. They hope to enroll in college, and intend to dedicate themselves to making medical marijuana legal in all 50 states.

  • Within 20 minutes of arriving through his front door she had flagged down a car and caught a train. He found out she had also run up a £500 bill on his mobile phone.

    Heartbroken Mr Gannon, who married Patrice in Jamaica early this year, believes his new wife fled to Bristol to meet a Jamaican boyfriend with whom she had organised the scheme.

  • Yesterday, historian and author Barry H. Landau was arrested on charges of stealing historical documents, including ones signed by Abraham Lincoln, from the Maryland Historical Society. The arrest eventually led to Landau’s locker, where police found upwards of 60 documents worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    Laudau’s heist and the tremendous value of the stolen documents got us thinking about the other end of the literature theft spectrum: what are the most frequently stolen books from bookstores?

    The results are surprisingly consistent–the same books and authors keep getting stolen across the country, so much so that many of them are frequently shelved behind the counter. Here are 5 of the most frequently stolen books, with sources listed below.

  • The main ingredients are melatonin, a hormone that is intended to induce drowsiness; L-theanine, an amino acid primarily found in green tea; GABA, a chemical that calms the mind; B vitamins, and chamomile — a plant that often winds up as tea that people drink to help them unwind.
  • Rupert Murdoch, the Chairman and CEO of News Corporation, was the target of “a white foam pie” attack on Tuesday as he was testifying before a British Parliament committee about the News of the World phone hacking scandal.
  • Apparently, the white boy was in the wrong country.
    Treat the non-whites in white countries like kings and queens but don’t receive the same treatment in their country, a bit funny, isn’t it?
    The poor little kid… If I knew who he was, I would raise him, I’m still not sure if he’s dead or alive, such a poor kid… another kid bites the dust from non-whites action as always.
    He is white, why does people get upset when I mention the word WHITE?
    This is life, accept it.
    The Chinese people are saying “white boy, go home, go away”.
  • An electronic DOT road sign was apparently hacked when a displayed message read “Impeach Obama.”
  • After inhaling a mall-bought batch of “Iaroma”—a synthetic pot substitute sold as ‘incense’—a 19-year-old Chicago boy dies after taking a 100 mph joyride into a neighbor’s house.
  • Baphomet is an enigmatic, goat-headed figure found in several instance in the history of occultism. From the Knights Templar of the Middle-Ages and the Freemasons of the 19th century to modern currents of occultism, Baphomet never fails to create controversy. But where does Baphomet originate from and, most importantly, what is the true meaning of this symbolic figure? This article looks at the origins of Baphomet, the esoteric meaning of Baphomet and its occurrence in popular culture.
  • The man, John Blanchard, was allegedly smoking crystal meth at the storage yard near his camper when he left a propane torch ignited on the ground, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

    The torch flame lit a container of gunpowder Blanchard was apparently stockpiling, causing an explosion.

    A loaded rifle was recovered from the scene as was more gunpowder and 300 feet of detonation cord found in an open safe, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

  • Amid news that troubled rap veteran Earl “DMX” Simmons had allegedly been caught smuggling contraband into prison thus extending his sentence, a spokesperson from the Arizona Department of Corrections has decried the erroneous reports that the rapper committed the said offense.

    Barrett Marson, the media contact that dismissed the reports, gave a quote to website Rumorfix stating, “He did not smuggle drugs into prison. He failed a drug test, I don’t know what drugs he took, but that’s it. He was due to be released today but will now be released on July 19th.” Prison records show that DMX was not exactly a model prisoner with several disciplinary write-ups including drug test failure, disorderly conduct and possession of drugs.

  • Mota went to speak with the driver, who said he was there to deal with the lack of a license plate. Mota smelled marijuana inside the vehicle, he said.

    Officers found the 17 pounds in large plastic containers and called county narcotics officers to investigate.

    The driver indicated he had paperwork for possessing medical marijuana but 17 pounds is well over allowable limits, Mota said.

  • Mortgage industry employees are still signing documents they haven’t read and using fake signatures more than eight months after big banks and mortgage companies promised to stop the illegal practices that led to a nationwide halt of home foreclosures.

    County officials in at least three states say they have received thousands of mortgage documents with questionable signatures since last fall, suggesting that the practices, known collectively as “robo-signing,” remain widespread in the industry.

  • The Army refuses to release information on its investigation into whether a three-star general conducted psychological operations on members of Congress during their visits to Afghanistan, according to the two Army information operations officers at the center of the controversy.
    Michael Holmes, the officer who says he refused orders to conduct Psy-Ops on American officials, and Laurel Levine filed a federal FOIA complaint, saying the Army and the U.S. Army Central Command refused to release the records.
    Holmes and Levine says the Army investigation “also covered allegations of whistleblower retaliation conducted against the plaintiffs for challenging unlawful orders.”
  • Bad hoodoo from the Jessamine County Fair. Dark times. A champion laid low. On Wednesday, David L. Warner Jr., of Nicholasville, Ky., drove a beaut of a derby in the ultra-competitive small car class. Warner demolished many things on his way to the title. But instead of getting to enjoy his victory, Warner got busted for DUI. The champion had allegedly been pounding Bud Lights before the derby, according to a whole bunch of dirty snitches who ratted him out to the cops.
  • Human rights lawyers are seeking an arrest warrant against a former CIA legal director who allegedly approved drone attacks in Pakistan that killed hundreds.
    It’s claimed John Rizzo agreed on a list of people to be targeted by drone strikes – a practice which started in 2004 under the Bush administration. For more on this RT joined by Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer.
  • Julia Sullivan wants to be a cheerleader.

    She likes to dance. She wants to get people excited for games. She has friends on the cheerleading squad.

    “I just think it would be fun,” the 16-year-old said.

    So she’s practiced. Her older sister, a former cheerleader, helped her figure out ways she could cheer from her wheelchair. Julia, who’ll be a junior at Aurora High School this fall, was born without legs and with arms that stop short of her elbows.

    This spring, for the third time, she tried out to be a cheerleader. For the third time, she didn’t made the squad.

    Last month, she and her parents, Mike and Carolyn Sullivan, asked the Aurora school board to correct what they see as “scoring errors” in her tryout evaluations this spring, saying she was given no accommodation for her disability.

    Their attorney cited the Americans With Disabilities Act and other federal laws that prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities.

  • On June 1, the Taliban raided the Taliban crossed the border from Afghanistan and raided the Shaltalu area of the district of Dir in northwestern Pakistan. This video shows the execution of more than a dozen Pakistani policemen who were captured during the fighting. The Taliban leader gives a speech prior to executing the Pakistani men:

    “These are the enemies of Islam who originated from Pakistan. They are the Pakistani police, soldiers and their supporters who recently lined up six kids in Swat and shot them execution style. These Pakistanis are now our captive and we will avenge the death of the children by doing the same to them.”

  • There has been speculation for months now that the House Republicans’ transportation bill proposal would be terrible for transit, biking, and walking. And sure enough, John Mica didn’t disappoint.

    The chair of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee yesterday released a six-year reauthorization proposal that would slash overall transportation funding 33 percent and eliminate dedicated funds for biking and walking.

  • That then gave them access across large parts of the News International network, possibly including the archived emails, and to the Sun’s “content management system” (CMS) – which formats news onto pages. That will have included the code for the “breaking news” element of the Sun’s main webpage; changing the entire content on the page would be too obvious.

    By including a line of Javascript in the “breaking news” element, the hackers were able to ensure that anyone visiting the Sun’s home page would, as the ticker was automatically refreshed, they would be redirected to anywhere that the hackers chose.

    Initially they made it redirect to a fake page they had created at new-times.co.uk/sun which attempted to look and read like a Sun story claiming that Rupert Murdoch had been found dead. That page used a template of another story that first appeared on 14 July, suggesting that the hackers either grabbed an archived story or have had access since then.

  • Video – Rep. Jan Schakowsky On WLS Chicago – July 13, 2011The proof comes at the 3:20 mark, but the entire clip is worth seeing.

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Conjured by SeMeN SPeRmS on July 20, 2011

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Just One Minute, Young Lady!

  • A man who brought a small bag of cocaine into the Okaloosa County Jail quickly realized his mistake and asked if he could just flush it down the toilet.

    His request was denied.

    Kyndric Dallas Wilson, a 19-year-old Mary Esther man, had the bag of cocaine in the palm of his hand as he was being processed into the jail. When jail personnel asked him what it was, he told them it was cocaine.

  • A murdered Philippine politician caught his killer on camera just moments before he was shot dead, with the photograph leading to the arrest of the suspected gunman, police said Tuesday.

    The photograph, taken by district councillor Reynaldo Dagsa and distributed by his family to media, shows his relatives posing outside their home while a gunman in the background appears to aim a pistol at the victim.

  • A 10-year-old boy was charged Monday with murder, a crime nearly unheard of at such a young age, after authorities said he told a neighbor about the killing.

    Paramedics found Deborah McVay, 46, of Big Prairie, lying facedown in her living room Sunday night, dead of a single gunshot wound to her head, Holmes County Sheriff Tim Zimmerly said. Authorities went to the home after a neighbor called a dispatcher to say McVay’s son had come to her home and confessed to shooting his mother.

  • A motorist was rear-ended Tuesday when he stopped suddenly after spotting what he thought was a person lying in the road Tuesday in South Middleton Township, Cumberland County, state police said.
    Thanks Patrick Nybakken

    The person turned out to be an inflatable doll, investigators said.
  • Lincoln Center went lowbrow last night — hosting a free punk-rock concert that turned into a mini-riot.

    About 100 fans of the Brooklyn-based band Japanther rushed the stage during the Rock N’ Roll Circus in Damrosch Park at 11:30 p.m., said the event’s co-producer, Jessica Resler.

    “People were crowd-surfing and jumping on each other. It was like, what the hell just happened?” Resler said.

    A teenager who went to see her favorite band with two pals said she was scared to death.

    “Oh, my God, it was crazy. I was off my feet for a whole minute. I thought I was going to die in there,” said Jessica Schmidt, 18.

  • Hundreds of dead snapper have washed up on Coromandel beaches, leaving holidaymakers perplexed.

    People at Little Bay and Waikawau Bay, on the north-east of the peninsula, were stunned when children came out of the sea with armfuls of the fish and within minutes the shore was littered with them.

    Charlotte Pearsall, whose family have lived at Little Bay for the last 30 years, said she had never seen anything like it.

    ”It was so surreal,” she said. ”It’s such an incredible waste – it could’ve fed the whole northern tip of the Coromandel.”

    People with binoculars said the snapper stretched as far as they could see and boaties reported ”a carpet of floating fish further out to sea all along the coast”.

    ”We initially thought ‘woohoo a free feed’ but they had really cloudy eyes and you could see the birds had been at them. Some of them had no eyes,” Pearsall said.

  • Thousands of dead fish are floating in Volusia County Tuesday. They were all in Spruce Creek in Port Orange. The fish kill is unusual, according to people who live along the creek, because it’s warm.

    It’s been a week since there were freezing temperatures, but there are fish lining the banks. Some said it’s the worst kill they’ve ever seen; thousands of fish lined the twists and turns of Spruce Creek.

    The sheer number of fish and the smell were both overwhelming.

    “It was fun last night trying to sleep with the smell going on,” said resident Sunny Morningstar.

    “Even with your windows closed and everything?” WFTV reporter Jason Allen asked.

    “Yes, yes,” Morningstar said.

    Buzzards and pelicans flocked to the site Tuesday and swarmed above the water. They filled trees and private boat docks and waited at the water’s edge for an easy meal.

  • Internet users have recently been concerned with news about a “Gulf of Aden Stargate.” Rumors claim that as early as December 9, 2009, a spiral of blue light, like a computer-generated image, suddenly appeared in the sky over northern Norway. About a month after the spiral disappeared, a massive magnetic field that appeared in the Gulf of Aden opened up a wormhole or “Stargate.” The rumor said that the multinational military escort in the Gulf of Aden, ostensibly there to fight Somali pirates, is actually working to explore the Stargate and distant galaxies a million light years away.
  • Spokesmen for the so-called “Somali pirates” have expressed willingness to transfer part of their loot captured from transnational boats and send it to Haiti.

    Leaders of these groups have declared they have links in various places around the world to help them ensure the delivery of aid without being detected by the armed forces of enemy governments.

    The “pirates” typically redistribute a significant portion of their profits among relatives and the local population. In their operations, the “pirates” urge transnational corporations that own the cargo confiscated to pay back in cash as banks can not operate in Somalia.

  • A federal prison in Kentucky was a temporary home for thousands, including Sonny Rollins, Peter Lorre and William S. Burroughs as well as a lab for addiction treatments such as LSD
  • As soon as the government was gone, mysterious European ships started appearing off the coast of Somalia, dumping vast barrels into the ocean. The coastal population began to sicken. At first they suffered strange rashes, nausea and malformed babies. Then, after the 2005 tsunami, hundreds of the dumped and leaking barrels washed up on shore. People began to suffer from radiation sickness, and more than 300 died.

    Ahmedou Ould-Abdallah, the UN envoy to Somalia, tells me: “Somebody is dumping nuclear material here. There is also lead, and heavy metals such as cadmium and mercury – you name it.” Much of it can be traced back to European hospitals and factories, who seem to be passing it on to the Italian mafia to “dispose” of cheaply. When I asked Mr Ould-Abdallah what European governments were doing about it, he said with a sigh: “Nothing. There has been no clean-up, no compensation, and no prevention.”

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Yer A Punk Under Pressure

    • Thanks Baller
    • Windows, posters, signs, and writings on walls fascinate me. My NY graffiti images are celebrated in the 1974 book The Faith of Graffiti/Watching My Name Go By and the recently released The Birth of Graffiti
    • “Narcissistic tendencies in many people fuels a need to have a large group of “friends” link to their pages and many of these people accept cyber-friends that they don’t even know. This provides an excellent vantage point for FDNS to observe the daily life of beneficiaries and petitioners who are suspected of fraudulent activities. This social networking gives FDNS an opportunity to reveal fraud by browsing these sites to see if petitioners and beneficiaries are in a valid relationship or are attempting to deceive [United States Citizen and Immigration Services] about their relationship. Once a user posts online, they create a public record and timeline of their activities. In essence, using MySpace and other like sites is akin to doing an unannounced cyber “site-visit” on a [sic] petitioners and beneficiaries.”
    • Bryan, 46, a writer who lives in Illinois, began supplying his parents about five years ago, after he told them about his own marijuana use. When he was growing up, he said, his parents were very strict about illegal drugs. “We would have grounded him,” said his mother, who is 72. But with age and the growing acceptance of medical marijuana, his parents were curious. His father had a heart ailment, his mother had dizzy spells and nausea, and both were worried about Alzheimer’s disease and cancer. They looked at some research and decided marijuana was worth a try.
    • The wild and eerie Victorian world of Walter Potter, where baby rabbits go to school and weep over their blotted copybooks, and where Bullingdon Club-style squirrels puff on cigars as toads play leapfrog and rat police raid a drinking den, is being reassembled in London, seven years after his creatures were sold and scattered across the world.
    • Violent J explained himself unapologetically to a New Jersey newspaper: “You have to speak their language. You have to interest them, gain their trust, talk to them and show you’re one of them. You’re a person from the street and you speak of your experiences. Then at the end you can tell them: God has helped me.”
    • “Topps’ Ugly Hang-Ups is an unproduced and still little-known test project from 1968, edited by Bhob Stewart and drawn by legendary MAD cartoonist Basil Wolverton. The specimens shown here represent a good sample of the test-run rescued by Topps employees shortly after a focus group of Brooklyn schoolkids killed it — the consensus being that their parents would NEVER let them have them.”

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