Nightclub | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Poke Out Big Brother’s Eyes

Smash CCTV
.
.
Game to destroy CCTV cameras: vandalism or valid protest?
The game is real-life Grand Theft Auto for those tired of being watched by the authorities in Berlin; points are awarded for the number of cameras destroyed and bonus scores are given for particularly imaginative modes of destruction. Axes, ropes and pitchforks are all encouraged. The rules of Camover are simple: mobilise a crew and think of a name that starts with “command”, “brigade” or “cell”, followed by the moniker of a historical figure (Van der Lubbe, a Dutch bricklayer convicted of setting fire to the Reichstag in 1933, is one name being used). Then destroy as many CCTV cameras as you can. Concealing your identity, while not essential, is recommended. Finally, video your trail of destruction and post it on the game’s website – although even keeping track of the homepage can be a challenge in itself, as it is continually being shut down.
.
.
FAQ in English | CAMOVER
1.1) Why destroy cctv cameras ? Trust your instincts, but if you need intellectual justification then: “The gaze of the cameras does not fall equally on all users of the street but on those who are stereotypical predefined as potentially deviant, or through appearance and demeanour, are singled out by operators as unrespectable. In this way youth, particularly those already socially and economically marginal, may be subject to even greater levels of authoritative intervention and official stigmatisation, and rather than contributing to social justice through the reduction of victimisation, CCTV will merely become a tool of injustice through the amplification of differential and discriminatory policing.” “an instrument of social control and the production of discipline; the production of ‘anticipatory conformity’; the certainty of rapid deployment to observed deviance and; the compilation of individualised dossiers of the monitored population.”
.
.

THE MOST DECADENT NIGHTCLUB IN THE WORLD; Mick Jagger was refused entry, Boy George dressed up as a nun and ran the cloakroom while the owner set up secret dates for Prince Andrew and Koo Stark. Here the founder of Blitz nightclub, Steve Strange, reveals

I had just opened my club, Blitz, when one night, a quite drunk Mick Jagger turned up. We had been in trouble with the fire brigade for letting too many people into the club and that night the building was packed. I had to go to the door and tell Mick, the biggest rock star in the world, that he couldn’t come in. The story goes that I held a mirror up to his wrinkled face and said: ‘Would you let yourself in?’ But the truth is more mundane, I just couldn’t let him in: we were full. I tried to be polite, but Mick got annoyed and said: ‘Don’t you know who I am?’ before storming off in search of nightlife elsewhere. The next day the story was all over the papers. It was the best publicity we could have had. Overnight, Blitz became the club for the new young elite and the legend of the New Romantics was born.
.
.

Unseen, all-out cyber war on the U.S. has begun

“The cyber war has been under way in the private sector for the past year,” says Israel Martinez, a board member of the U.S. National Cyber Security Council, a nonprofit group composed of federal government and private sector executives. “We’re finding espionage, advanced persistent threats (APTs), and other malware sitting in networks, often for more than a year before it’s ever detected,” Martinez says. He says U.S. entities are being targeted on multiple fronts by China and Iran for espionage and intellectual property theft, by interests in Russia and Eastern Europe for syndicated crime such stealing cash and identities, by social-agenda “hacktivist” groups such as Anonymous, and by increasingly skilled individual criminal hackers.
.
.

More Than A Dozen Brands Of Security Camera Systems Vulnerable To Hacker Hijacking

Eighteen brands of security camera digital video recorders (DVRs) are vulnerable to an attack that would allow a hacker to remotely gain control of the devices to watch, copy, delete or alter video streams at will, as well as to use the machines as jumping-off points to access other computers behind a company’s firewall, according to tests by two security researchers. And one of the researchers, security firm Rapid7′s chief security officer H.D. Moore, has discovered that 58,000 of the hackable video boxes, all of which use firmware provided by the Guangdong, China-based firm Ray Sharp, are accessible via the Internet. “The DVR gives you access to all their video, current and archived,” says Moore. “You could look at videos, pause and play, or just turn off the cameras and rob the store.”
.
.

Swartz didn’t face prison until feds took over case, report says

State prosecutors who investigated the late Aaron Swartz had planned to let him off with a stern warning, but federal prosecutor Carmen Ortiz took over and chose to make an example of the Internet activist, according to a report in Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly. Middlesex County’s district attorney had planned no jail time, “with Swartz duly admonished and then returned to civil society to continue his pioneering electronic work in a less legally questionable manner,” the report (alternate link) said. “Tragedy intervened when Ortiz’s office took over the case to send ‘a message.'”
.
.

North Korean parents ‘eat their children’ after being driven mad by hunger in famine-hit pariah state

Undercover reporters found a ‘shocking’ number of cannibalism incidents Up to 10,000 people feared dead after ‘hidden famine’ in farming provinces Drought and confiscated food contribute to desperate shortage, reports say Reports of men digging up corpses for food and murdering children
.
.

Judge bans father-of-four who owes $100k child support from having any more kids

A father-of-four who owes $100,000 in child support has been ordered by a judge to stop having children, it was revealed today. Asim Taylor, 35, from Elyria, Ohio, was sentenced to an additional five years’ probation last Wednesday after failing to pay child support for his four children. If Taylor has another child in this time he could go to jail for one year. He was originally indicted in August 2011, accused of owing $78,922 to the mothers of his four children. He pleaded guilty, and now owes more than $96,000 in child support payments. Judge James Walther told the defendant at his sentencing, according to the Lorain county Chronicle-Telegram: ‘I put this condition on for one reason and one reason alone. It’s your personal responsibility to pay for these kids.’
.
.

Helter Skelter: Is The Conflict In Mali A ‘Race War’?

The spiraling war in the West African country of Mali has now involved Western military forces, principally airpower and ground troops from former colonial master France, as well as military equipment from Britain, the United States and other allies. However, even before the intervention by Europeans and other Westerners, the conflict in Mali was already complex — a hodgepodge of Islamist and separatist groups in the vast northern region of the desert country engaged in a battle with government troops based in the south. In addition, the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) has begun sending troops into the country to defend the Bamako regime. Aside from issues of religion and territorial sovereignty, another factor may be playing into this evolving drama — race.
.
.

KKK robes in class? Students’ presentation sparks debate

KKK robes in class: Clark County School District officials investigated and the Las Vegas Academy principal sent parents a letter calling the incident “unfortunate” after one of the students was photographed wearing the KKK white robe and hooded mask in class.
.
.

A retrospective editing of consciousness

A new study has found that conscious experience can be altered retrospectively, so that experience of visual information can be changed almost half a second later by manipulating where our attention is drawn.
.
.

Pro-Foreskin Protesters target Oprah in Vancouver

Her advice may be followed by hordes of people, but a Vancouver group wants Oprah Winfrey to explain why she has endorsed an anti-wrinkle cream made with human foreskins.
.
.

New Mexico Bill Would Criminalize Abortions After Rape As ‘Tampering With Evidence’

A Republican lawmaker in New Mexico introduced a bill on Wednesday that would legally require victims of rape to carry their pregnancies to term in order to use the fetus as evidence for a sexual assault trial. House Bill 206, introduced by state Rep. Cathrynn Brown (R), would charge a rape victim who ended her pregnancy with a third-degree felony for “tampering with evidence.” “Tampering with evidence shall include procuring or facilitating an abortion, or compelling or coercing another to obtain an abortion, of a fetus that is the result of criminal sexual penetration or incest with the intent to destroy evidence of the crime,” the bill says.
.
.

Microbes Survive, and Maybe Thrive, High in the Atmosphere

Each year, hundreds of millions of metric tons of dust, water, and humanmade pollutants make their way into the atmosphere, often traveling between continents on jet streams. Now a new study confirms that some microbes make the trip with them, seeding the skies with billions of bacteria and other organisms—and potentially affecting the weather. What’s more, some of these high-flying organisms may actually be able to feed while traveling through the clouds, forming an active ecosystem high above the surface of the Earth.
.
.

2 men arrested for stealing chicken wings worth $60K

No word on the whereabouts of the wings, according to police.
.
.

“>Trashy Mom Gets Tased [Video]

Mothers of the Year
.
.

Mother Holds Baby As Baby Gets A Tattoo [Video]
.

.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

The Decline of Western Civilization Part II: The Metal Years

The Decline of Western Civilization Part II: The Metal Years is a documentary film directed by Penelope Spheeris about the Los Angeles heavy metal scene from 1986 to 1988. It is the second film of a trilogy by Spheeris depicting life in Los Angeles at various points in time. The first film dealt with the punk rock scene during 1979-1980. The third film chronicles the gutter punk lifestyle of homeless teenagers in the late 1990s.

The film features concert footage and interviews of legendary heavy metal and hard rock bands and artists such as Aerosmith, Kiss, Megadeth, Motörhead, Ozzy Osbourne, W.A.S.P, and Alice Cooper. The film premiered at The Wiltern Theatre and featured David F. Castagno, Publisher/Editor of Screamer Magazine as the master of ceremony

The documentary follows the heavy metal scene in Los Angeles, with particular emphasis on the glam metal sub-genre. Spheeris explores the more famous musicians, including Alice Cooper, Aerosmith, Ozzy Osbourne, Dave Mustaine and Paul Stanley. She then explores unknown bands, such as London, Odin and Seduce. The film also features interviews with members of Poison, Tuff, Vixen, Faster Pussycat, W.A.S.P., and more. Serious issues such as drug usage, alcohol abuse, and censorship are tackled, as well as vanity issues like celebrity and sales.

– Wikipedia


File under Blast From The Past, Cult Movies, Culture, Drunk Kids, Fashion, Fuck Art Let's Fuck, Massive Consumption of Drugs, Music, Re¢e$$ion $pe¢iaL, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex

A New York Police State Of Mind

  • Fuck Yeah 80’s!
  • Situated at the landing site of the Apollo 14 Moon Expedition there seems to be something a little out of the ordinary happening. Is this an image of an underground base that has been built by NASA?
  • 4 Bit Craze Not For Epileptics
  • The Google Maps satellite image of Fairfield College in Hamilton, New Zealand, appears to show not one, but six penises (penii? penae?) scrawled on its lawns by merry mischief makers.
  • The NYPD is pressuring Manhattan club owners to buy ID scanners that collect the personal information of every patron carded at the door, sources said.

    The move is ostensibly part of police anti-terror efforts, according to one source said — but opponents are crying foul, saying it’s a civil-rights violation for patrons and could lead to identity theft.

    “Any bar below 14th Street has been approached by . . . a police sergeant,” said one angry nightclub owner who asked to remain anonymous.

    “They say you need to get these scanners. I have three places and it’s happened to two of them. Police are pressuring us,” the owner said.

    Bars with the devices have bouncers swipe every patron’s ID card through the scanner. The patron’s name, date of birth and address is then downloaded and made available to the NYPD upon request.

  • The Shroud of Turin was made by medieval artist Giotto, it was claimed yesterday.

    The 14ft length of fabric, said to be the burial cloth of Christ, bears a faint image of a man and appears to be stained by blood.

    However carbon-dating tests have suggested it was produced between 1260 and 1390.

  • All planets move around their stars in the same direction as the star spins—at least that’s what we thought. But now Australian National University astronomer Dr. Daniel Bayliss and his colleagues have found a planet that breaks the mold.
  • The man who can sell icebergs to eskimo may be a great salesman, but the guy who can tug icebergs to Saudi Arabia will be remembered as an engineering genius.

    French engineer Georges Mougin may be that man. Fast Company reports that ever since the 1970s, he’s been working on a method to tow freshwater icebergs across the Arctic. Now, with 3-D tech, declassified satellite data, and tugboats, he might have cracked the way to quench the world’s thirst.

  • A Catholic doctors’ association in Germany believes it can cure the sexual orientation of gays and lesbians with sugar pills — though only at their request, the group says. But the homo-homeopathy has been harshly criticized by members of its target community.
  • Nuclear expert Arnie Gundersen talks to CNN’s John King about the dangers of the radiation situation in Japan.
  • On Sunday a story appeared on the PBS website saying that Shakur was still alive and hiding out in New Zealand.

    The rapper was shot dead in 1996 in Las Vegas.

    A group calling itself LulzSec claimed to have hacked the site in a posting on the microblogging website Twitter, saying the attack was motivated by a recent documentary about the whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks.

  • This Black & White Mickey Mouse cartoon was released on june 17, 1933. On this cartoon Mickey Mouse makes a robot to fight against gorilla “Kongo Killer” in boxing ring.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Get Prehistoric

  • But in recent days, “Operation Sony” morphed from a standard website attack into something a bit more personal, as some Anons formed a separate “Sony Recon” mission and began tracking down corporate executives, their wives, the schools their children attend, and the shops at which they buy their flowers. And the way they obtain that information can be ingenious—and disquieting.

    Gathering this sort of information is referred to as “doxing” or collecting “dox” on targets, and such data is usually collected and distributed so that others can use it “for the lulz”—amusement, legitimate protest, or harassment.
    Jack Tretton

    Public information sources, if properly collated, can supply a wealth of detail. For instance, when a Sony exec’s address was located, it was the work of a few moments on local government websites to find out what he pays in taxes, how large the house is, and who lives next door.

  • When you don‘t like what someone’s wearing you a) kindly suggest she change b) make a joke about it so she gets the hint, or c) get a posse to jump her in a bodega, beat her repeatedly, and slash her face. The girls in the following video chose option c
  • Swimming pools are one way of surviving Arizona’s sky-high temperatures, which hit triple digits in a recent uncharacteristically early burst of heat. But Dennis McClung’s pool, in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa, has been redesigned into a survivalist refuge of an entirely different sort.

    Mr. McClung has installed a subterranean garden in his pool along with a fish pond and chicken coop. The chicken droppings feed the tilapia, which swim in water that is pumped up through the blackberry, cherry tomato, bell pepper and chili plants. The ecosystem is designed to feed his family with minimal trips to the supermarket.

  • On the second floor of the downtown campus, a motley group of students listens to a lecture titled “Palliative and Curative Relief Through a Safe and Effective Herbal Medicine.” Not the sexiest of topics on the face of it, but there’s a catch: this is Oaksterdam University, and the medicine being discussed is marijuana. At “America’s first cannabis college,” in Oakland, Calif., the sallow-faced hippy-skater types that one expects to find sit beside middle-aged professionals in business attire, united in their zeal for the pungent green leaf. No one dares speak out of turn, until instructor Paul Armentano, a marijuana-policy expert, cites a news report that U.S. antidrug authorities plan to legalize pot’s active ingredient exclusively for drug companies’ use. “More stinking profits for Big Business,” mumbles a young man wearing a baseball cap. His classmates groan in agreement.
  • That’s what startup Cloud Girlfriend promises, although your friends on Facebook will never know it. The new Internet company helps guys who aren’t ready to admit, at least online, that they don’t have a significant other.

    The new service allows users to create the perfect girlfriend who will write on your Facebook wall and otherwise make her ghostly presence known through social media.

  • “More African American men are in prison or jail, on probation or parole than were enslaved in 1850, before the Civil War began,” Michelle Alexander told a standing room only house at the Pasadena Main Library this past Wednesday, the first of many jarring points she made in a riveting presentation.
  • An unexpected side-effect of the flooding in parts of Pakistan has been that millions of spiders climbed up into the trees to escape the rising flood waters.

    Because of the scale of the flooding and the fact that the water has taken so long to recede, many trees have become cocooned in spiders webs. People in this part of Sindh have never seen this phenonemon before – but they also report that there are now less mosquitos than they would expect, given the amoungt of stagnant, standing water that is around.

  • Kamila Remisova Vesinova and her team of researchers from the Czech Archeological Society believe they have unearthed the remains of an early homosexual man. The remains date from around 2900-2500 B.C., on the outskirts of Prague.

    That claim stems from the fact the 5,000-year old skeleton was buried in a manner reserved for women in the Corded Ware culture: its head was pointed east rather than west, and its remains were surrounded by domestic jugs rather than by hammers, flint knives and weapons that typically accompany male remains.

    “From history and ethnology, we know that people from this period took funeral rites very seriously so it is highly unlikely that this positioning was a mistake,” Vesinova said at a press conference. “Far more likely is that he was a man with a different sexual orientation, homosexual or transsexual.”

  • Embryonic stem cells from mice have been transformed into a rudimentary eye, raising hopes of growing parts of the human eye to investigate and treat blindness
  • The link between media exposure and adolescent emotional health continues to be a hot research area. In a new study, researchers found that teens who spend more time listening to music, rather than reading books, are more likely to be depressed.
  • Are we about to start going backwards, to a pre-antibiotic era in which things like hip replacements, chemotherapy and intensive care are simply impossible? It’s a big enough fear for the World Health Organization to devote this year’s World Health Day on April 7 to antimicrobial resistance in a bid to safeguard these drugs for future generations.

    “Modern medicine can’t function without effective antibiotics,” says Derek Butler, chairman of the MRSA Action UK charity for which the Owens are raising money. “If we lose these magic bullets, medicine will be set back over 80 years.

  • With all sorts of the funding cuts hitting orchestras during the recent recession, there is still one aspect of classical music that local governments find valuable — the music’s unfailing ability to disperse loitering teenagers from public areas.

    Whether its Handel piped into New York’s Port Authority or Tchaikovsky at a public library in London, the sound of classical music is apparently so repellent to teenagers that it sends them scurrying away like frightened mice. Private institutions also find it useful: chains such as McDonald’s and 7-Eleven, not to mention countless shopping malls around the world, have relied on classical music to shoo away potentially troublesome kids.

  • In Japan, rescue teams are continuing to search for the bodies of those killed by the earthquake and tsunami.
    Twelve days on, just over 9,000 people are now known to have died but more than 13,000 others are still missing and nearly 270,000 people have lost their homes or been forced out by contamination.
  • A pill to enhance moral behaviour, a treatment for racist thoughts, a therapy to increase your empathy for people in other countries – these may sound like the stuff of science fiction but with medicine getting closer to altering our moral state, society should be preparing for the consequences, according to a book that reviews scientific developments in the field.
  • A massive fight at an East St. Louis nightclub involving dozens of people was caught on camera. At least one man, a security guard, was shot. Now police are trying to identify everyone in the video to determine who was hurt, who was responsible, and who broke the law.

    One man was body slammed to the ground by what appears to be a security guard. Another man was blindsided by a punch. And then, More.. just seconds later, there’s a gunshot. The bullet, apparently fired by a security guard, hits another guard in the hand.

  • According to one leading anarchist protester, plans are being drawn up for a demonstration using “shock and awe” tactics to disrupt Prince William’s marriage to Kate Middleton on April 29.

    Charlie Veitch, a former City banker who was made redundant during the financial crisis, heads a group of colorful protesters called the “Love Police Academy.” He says that anarchists will put on a “disruption spectacular.”

  • The ads are for chunks of meteorites, bits of asteroids that have fallen from the sky and are as prized by scientists as they are by collectors. As more meteorites have been discovered in recent years, interest in them has flourished and an illegal sales market has boomed — much to the dismay of the people who want to study them and the countries that consider them national treasures.

    “It’s a black market,” said Ralph P. Harvey, a geologist at Case Western Reserve University who directs the federal search for meteorites in Antarctica. “It’s as organized as any drug trade and just as illegal.”

  • The Former CIA Counter-terrorism analyst Michael Scheuer strongly opposed the Obama’s administration actions in Libya on CNN this morning. Scheuer believes that there isn’t a strong case for America’s intervention especially at a time when the country hasn’t even recovered from the recession. Also, Scheuer had doubts if the rebels that we are arming would really be any better than the Gadaffi regime: “I’m not sure that that the opposition, if it takes power, is going to be much better than was Gadaffi.” Moreover, Scheuer argues that the US involvement in Libya would serve as a recruitment tool for extremists. “In the muslim world, this is Americans killing Muslims again, and it looks like its for oil.”
  • So, with heavy heart, the proprietor, Matthew Maher, 70, climbed up a small ladder. With curatorial care, he took down the two-dozen dust-cocooned wishbones dangling on an old gas lamp above the storied bar counter. He removed the clouds of gray from each bone. Then he placed every one of the bones, save for those that crumbled at his touch, back onto the gas lamp — where, in the context of this dark and wonderful establishment, they are not merely the scrap remains of poultry, but holy relics.
  • The chief of police for a small New Mexico town who was arrested for allegedly aiding in a gun running operation covered up the fact that his co-defendants Manuel Ortega, Ignacio Villalobos and village Councilman Jose Blas Gutierrez “were drinking and partying with 9 or 10 young girls, some of whom were in high school,” federal prosecutors said in a recent court filing.
  • The scientists have successfully introduced human genes into 300 dairy cows to produce milk with the same properties as human breast milk.

    Human milk contains high quantities of key nutrients that can help to boost the immune system of babies and reduce the risk of infections.

  • The Obama administration is urging Congress not to adopt legislation that would impose constitutional safeguards on Americans’ e-mail stored in the cloud.
  • About 70 percent of the 400 fuel rods in the No. 1 reactor at the crippled Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant are damaged, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) has revealed.

    In addition, some 30 percent of the 548 fuel rods in the No. 2 reactor core and 25 percent of those in the No. 3 reactor core are also thought to be damaged, the power company stated on April 6. The figures are based on analysis of radiation data collected from the side of the reactor pressure vessel between the March 11 earthquake and tsunami and March 15.

  • Unlike the US, there isn’t even a formal process with a judge rubber stamping the requests. Instead, the police ask, and Nominet is compelled to suspend the domain. In fact, some law enforcement officials are claiming that if Nominet refused their requests, then it would automatically become liable. In other words, police have a fantastic tool for censorship of any website if they want to use it that way.
  • Screen shots of computers in movies
  • Entire country loses internet for five hours after woman, 75, slices through cable while scavenging for copper

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under Culture, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

90210 U4EA 1991


Beverly Hills 90210
Season 2, Episode 15: U4EA
Original Air Date—14 November 1991
Emily leads the gang to an underground nightclub where she attempts to show Brandon the ultimate pleasure with drugs after she puts a hallucinogen in his drink, with disastrous emotional and financial consequences for him when they are forced to flee from a police raid only to leave Brandon’s car behind which gets stripped and ripped apart. Meanwhile, Kelly and Donna worry about David who gets drunk at the rave, while Steve and Andrea get lost in the inner city looking for the rest of the gang and driving to the wrong place each time.

httpvp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=89A62C60490BB129


Beverly Hills 90210

File under Blast From The Past, Drugsploitation, Massive Consumption of Drugs, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Trash TV

Rise Of The Robots

  • The three expiring Patriot Act provisions are:

    • The “roving wiretap” provision allows the FBI to obtain wiretaps from a secret intelligence court, known as the FISA court, without identifying what method of communication is to be tapped.

    • The “lone wolf” measure allows FISA court warrants for the electronic monitoring of a person for whatever reason — even without showing that the suspect is an agent of a foreign power or a terrorist. The government has said it has never invoked that provision, but the Obama administration said it wanted to retain the authority to do so.

    • The “business records” provision allows FISA court warrants for any type of record, from banking to library to medical, without the government having to declare that the information sought is connected to a terrorism or espionage investigation.

  • YouTube footage of what looks like a doll but is actually a waitress monkey in a human mask has been summed up as ‘so wonderfully creepy’ by one of thousands of open-mouthed internet users to view it recently. In the clip, the clothed creature – named Fukuchan – is seen scuttling around its place of employment, waiting tables and/or providing entertainment for punters. Towards the end of the video, our simian hero removes its mask and, in what we’ve chosen to interpret as an act of defiance against its human oppressors, lifts what looks like a sponge on a sink and chucks it on the floor.
  • Four hundred bloodthirsty wolves have been spotted prowling around the edges of Verkhoyansk, in Russia, attacking livestock at will.
  • Gator, the 80s vert god/party animal who raped his ex-girlfriend’s friend before killing her and burying her in the desert, was denied parole yesterday in his first hearing since he was convicted in 1991. While he is quite obviously severely fucked in the brain and the man holding the mallet made the right decision, he’s still one of our favorite dudes to watch ride a skateboard.
  • Leave it to Darpa, the Pentagon’s advanced-research arm, to bring synthetic biology to a new level of creepiness. For 2011, Darpa has dedicated $6 million to a new program called BioDesign, which according to the agency’s budget is an attempt to eliminate “the randomness of natural evolutionary advancement” and create synthetic organisms for specific functions—for instance, microorganisms that clean up oil spills or skin cells that an army medic could use to repair injuries. The twist: Darpa wants organisms “that could ultimately be programmed to live indefinitely.” Just in case, they would be equipped with a “self-destruct” option.

    But the self-destruct function, which should destroy the cells at a predetermined time or when they left their intended environment, has rarely been tested outside of a lab. There’s no way to limit a cell’s interaction with other cells or with its environment. There’s no guarantee that the cells won’t mutate or replicate incorrectly

  • The “rice” is made by mixing potatoes, sweet potatoes and plastic. The potatoes are first formed into the shape of rice grains. Industrial synthetic resins are then added to the mix. The rice reportedly stays hard even after being cooked.

    The Korean-language Weekly Hong Kong reported that the fake rice is being sold in the Chinese town of Taiyuan, in Shaanxi province.

    “A Chinese Restaurant Association official said that eating three bowls of this fake rice would be like eating one plastic bag. Due to the seriousness of the matter, he added that there would be an investigation of factories alleged to be producing the rice,” Very Vietnam noted.

  • “For ten months now I have been writing to ask you to make a public statement denouncing the actions of the Church of Scientology of San Diego,” Haggis wrote. Before the 2008 elections, a staff member at Scientology’s San Diego church had signed its name to an online petition supporting Proposition 8, which asserted that the State of California should sanction marriage only “between a man and a woman.” The proposition passed. As Haggis saw it, the San Diego church’s “public sponsorship of Proposition 8, which succeeded in taking away the civil rights of gay and lesbian citizens of California—rights that were granted them by the Supreme Court of our state—is a stain on the integrity of our organization and a stain on us personally. Our public association with that hate-filled legislation shames us.” Haggis wrote, “Silence is consent, Tommy. I refuse to consent.” He concluded, “I hereby resign my membership in the Church of Scientology.”
  • The polar opposite of Made Of Iron, this trope manifests when the human body is represented as being much flimsier and more easily dismembered than it really is, or when its internal structures are depicted as a mass of bloody, spongy goo, with no sign of supporting bones or recognizable organs.

    Heads and limbs may be instantly, cleanly severed on contact with anything resembling a bladed weapon or sharp-edged object. A bleeding wound will create a spray of so much High Pressure Blood the victim ends up Overdrawn At The Blood Bank. Accidental contact with a pointed object leads to out-the-other-side impalement. Bones snap like twigs, contact with fire burns a body to a charred skeleton within moments, or at worst the entire body is simply splattered by whatever force hits it like an overripe tomato.

  • The FBI is investigating the Church of Scientology over allegations of human trafficking, it is claimed.

    Federal investigators have been interviewing former members of the controversial organisation, which counts Tom Cruise and John Travolta among its followers, over allegations of enslavement and violent treatment.

    According to the New Yorker magazine, the FBI is also investigating allegations surrounding David Miscavige – the group’s leader and the best man at Cruise’s wedding – who has been accused of repeatedly hitting youngsters.

  • Almost 200 people from 15 countries have visited the International Space Station, but the orbiting complex has so far only ever had human crew members – until now.

    Robonaut 2, the latest generation of the Robonaut astronaut helpers, is set to launch to the space station aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-133 mission. It will be the first humanoid robot in space, and although its primary job for now is teaching engineers how dexterous robots behave in space, the hope is that through upgrades and advancements, it could one day venture outside the station to help spacewalkers make repairs or additions to the station or perform scientific work.

  • The Internet remains one of the most powerful means ever created to give voice to repressed people around the world.
    But as Peter Ekerskey reports in the Pacific Free Press, new technologies have also given authoritarian regimes new means to identify and retaliate against those who speak out despite censorship and surveillance.

    To try and even the playing field and he has offered a some useful tips to netizens in places like China, Vietnam, Burma and other groups in RFA’s audience on how to stay safe and how they can be helped from the outside.

    Below are six basic ideas for those attempting to speak without falling victim to authoritarian surveillance and censorship, and four ideas for the rest of us who want to help support them.

  • Arrest warrants were issued for 9 Florida women Monday, following an all-girl brawl at a local convenience store that left several of the women nude or partially nude when the girls began pulling at each other’s hair and clothing.

    According to the Ocala Police department, tempers were heated when two groups of women got into a confrontation at the Club Zanzabar nightclub on December 30. When the women crossed paths again later that night at a RaceTrac gas station, a full-out brawl erupted in the store’s parking lot.

    The ensuing fracas left several women nude or partially nude. Other women were bruised, scratched and/or had hair extensions pulled out.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death