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Sprang Fever

Chinese woman takes off her pants and fights cops with ‘em, KO’s one!

CIA tortured 9/11 detainees with Red Hot Chili Peppers #TortureMotherfucker
deathandtaxesmag.com/218665/cia-tor…

This is DISGUSTING: NYPD handcuffing shooting victims held on minor warrants nytimes.com/2014/04/12/nyr…

KFC Debuts ‘Chicken Corsage’
abcnews.go.com/blogs/lifestyl…

Mid 90′s Memphis Underground Rap Tapes
memphisraptapes.blogspot.hu

Word of the day: Kayfabe
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kayfabe

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Twitter Tweets

Pinky Violence: Essential Trailers (1970-1977)

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Pink film (ピンク映画 Pinku eiga or Pink eiga?) is a broad cinematic term used to categorize a wide variety of Japanese films with adult content. This encompasses everything from dramas to action thrillers and exploitation films (a.k.a. pinky violence), and softcore pornographic (romance pornography or roman poruno) features. The term is often mistakenly used to apply only to sex films. However, the so-called pink movie is part of an ongoing (and evolving) cycle of films rather than a specific genre.

Pinku eiga, along with the bloody and violent yakuza-eiga, or contemporary gangster film, both became wildly popular in the mid-1960s and dominated the Japanese domestic cinema through the mid-1980s. In the 1960s, the pink films were largely the product of small, independent studios. In the 1970s, some of Japan’s major studios, facing the loss of their theatrical audience, took over the pink film. With their access to higher production-values and talent, some of these films became critical and popular successes. Though the appearance of the AV (adult video) took away most of the pink film audience in the 1980s, films in this genre are still being produced.

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File under Arts 'n Crafts, Blast From The Past, Cult Movies, Fashion, Influences, Re¢e$$ion $pe¢iaL, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex

Pixote (1981) Teens Gone Wrong Brazilian Delinquent Youth Underage Drugs Sex Crime

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Pixote: a Lei do Mais Fraco (Portuguese pronunciation: [piˈʃɔtʃi a ˈlej du ˈmajʃ ˈfɾaku], Pixote (small child): The Law of the Weakest) is a 1981 Brazilian drama film directed by Hector Babenco. The screenplay was written by Babenco and Jorge Durán, based on the book A infância dos mortos (The Childhood of the Dead Ones) by José Louzeiro.

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It is the chilling, documentary-like account of Brazil’s delinquent youth and how they are used by corrupt police and other crime organizations to commit crimes.

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The film features Fernando Ramos Da Silva (who was killed at the age of 19 by Brazilian police in São Paulo) as Pixote and Marília Pêra as Sueli.

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The plot revolves around Pixote, a young boy who is used as a child criminal in muggings and drug transport.

After a police round up of street children Pixote is sent to a juvenile reformatory (FEBEM). The prison is a hellish school where Pixote uses glue sniffing as a means of emotional escape from the constant threats of abuse and rape.

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It soon becomes clear that the young criminals are only pawns in the criminal, sadistic games of the prison guards and their commander.

When a boy dies of physical abuse by the guards, they frame the lover of the transgendered effeminate boy known as Lilica (Jorge Julião), for the murder. This lover then conveniently also dies, with some help from the guards.

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Soon after, Pixote, Lilica and her new lover Dito (Gilberto Moura) find an opportunity to flee from the prison. First they stay at the apartment of Cristal (Tony Tornado), a former lover of Lilica, but when tensions arise they go to Rio for a cocaine drug deal; there, however, they get duped by a showgirl.

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After some time bumming around the city, Pixote and his friends go to a club for another drug deal. While there, Pixote finds the showgirl that took their drugs and stabs her.

They become pimps for the prostitute Sueli who is definitely past her prime and is possibly ill from a botched abortion. The group conspires to rob her johns, but when Lilica’s lover Dito falls for Sueli, Lillica leaves. The robbery scheme fails when an American john fights back (because he apparently does not understand Portuguese) so they have to shoot him. In the ensuing fight, Pixote accidentally shoots and kills Dito as well.

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Pixote tries to gain comfort from Sueli, treating her as a mother figure, but she rejects him. He leaves and is seen walking down a railway line, gun in hand, away from the camera, his figure disappearing in the distance, out of the film’s view.

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Film critic Roger Ebert, who writes for the Chicago Sun-Times, considers the film a classic, and wrote, “Pixote stands alone in Babenco’s work, a rough, unblinking look at lives no human being should be required to lead. And the eyes of Fernando Ramos da Silva, his doomed young actor, regard us from the screen not in hurt, not in accusation, not in regret — but simply in acceptance of a desolate daily reality.”

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Critic Pauline Kael was impressed by its raw, documentary-like quality, and a certain poetic realism. She wrote, “Babenco’s imagery is realistic, but his point of view is shockingly lyrical. South American writers, such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, seem to be in perfect, poetic control of madness, and Babenco has some of this gift, too. South American artists have to have it, in order to express the texture of everyday insanity.”

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The New York Times film critic, Vincent Canby, liked the neo-realist acting and direction of the drama, and wrote, “[Pixote], the third feature film by the Argentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco, is a finely made, uncompromisingly grim movie about the street boys of São Paulo, in particular about Pixote – which, according to the program, translates roughly as Peewee…The performances are almost too good to be true, but Mr. Da Silva and Miss Pera are splendid. Pixote is not for the weak of stomach. A lot of the details are tough to take, but it is neither exploitative nor pretentious. Mr. Babenco shows us rock-bottom, and because he is an artist, he makes us believe it as well all of the possibilities that have been lost.”

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Filmmakers Spike Lee and Harmony Korine have cited it as their favorite film.

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File under Cult Movies, Drunk Kids, Influences, It Only Gets Worse, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex

Madfits Biters – Streetwear Memes ‘n Internet Appropriation – A Bootleg Of A Bootleg

I was crusin’ around LA one day ‘n saw some wheatpastes of a mighty familiar image.

Ewww, why did you havta go ‘n stretch it in photoshop…

Antisocial Biters

Thought it was just street art but it seems to be a band or a night

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Okay, wait, now I googled ‘Alfred E Neuman Misfits Shirt‘, ‘n found a bunch of weird copies, I guess it’s bein’ assimilated by the internet ‘n mutant modern streetwear appropriation!

 

Boing Boing Madfits SeMeN SPeRmS

Boing Boing wrote it up in 2008 ‘n it got indexed on search engines, seems like most of the appropriated versions come from the Boing Boing picture, they have some distortion from the photos perspective, ‘n look like they were thrown into Illustrator by a savvy ‘graphic designer’ ‘n auto traced ‘n vectored at a low detail

 

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Here

‘n

Love Is Lame Is Lame

Love Is Lame Is Lame

Here

‘n

Here

‘n

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Here

‘n

This one really sucks…

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Let’s take it back to the OG version in 2006 ‘n Jason Dill (plus eye buttons)

 

File under Arts 'n Crafts, Back In The Dunn Day, Blast From The Past, Culture, Cut 'n' Paste Content, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

George Carlin

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George Denis Patrick Carlin (May 12, 1937 – June 22, 2008) was an American stand-up comediansocial criticsatiristactor, and writer/author who won five Grammy Awards for his comedy albums. Carlin was noted for his black humor as well as his thoughts on politics, the English languagepsychologyreligion, and various taboo subjects. Carlin and his “Seven Dirty Words” comedy routine were central to the 1978 U.S. Supreme Court case F.C.C. v. Pacifica Foundation, in which a 5–4 decision by the justices affirmed the government’s power to regulate indecent material on the public airwaves.

The first of his 14 stand-up comedy specials for HBO was filmed in 1977. From the late 1980s, Carlin’s routines focused on socio-cultural criticism of modern American society. He often commented on contemporary political issues in the United States and satirized the excesses of American culture. In 2004, Carlin placed second on the Comedy Central list of the 100 greatest stand-up comedians of all time, ahead of Lenny Bruce and behind Richard Pryor. He was a frequent performer and guest host on The Tonight Show during the three-decadeJohnny Carson era, and hosted the first episode of Saturday Night Live. His final HBO special,It’s Bad for Ya, was filmed less than four months before his death. In 2008, he was posthumously awarded the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

 

 

 

 

 

File under Arts 'n Crafts, Comedy, Culture, Influences, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Reggae: The Story of Jamaican Music – BBC Documentary

Reggae The Story Of Jamaican Music

“Reggae: The Story of Jamaican Music” was an impressive documentary made by director Mike Connolly for the BBC.

It was originally shown in 2002 and the documentary traces the evolution of Reggae Music from Mento and Ska, all the way up to Roots, Dub, and Dancehall. The film traces the story of how Jamaica conquered the world through its music. With interviews and commentary from reggae legends this is well worth investing some of your time in watching.

Interviews include Buju Banton, Shaggy, Sly and Robbie, Capleton, Max Romero, Bunny Wailer, Jimmy Cliff, Gregory Isaacs, and many many more.

The documentary has been hard to find in recent years, and doesn’t get too many repeats, so it was with great pleasure that we found it had been made available to watch online. We have aggregated it into 3 parts below……so enjoy!

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1/ TRAIN TO SKAVILLE
The early roots of reggae music, and its rise to popularity. How the music was used to recount experiences and songs of social commentary were written. In the sixties immigration from Jamaica to the UK increased and brought Jamaican music. Ska picked up a white fan base. The programme also covers both the music scene and the social climate in Jamaica during the sixties. By the end of the sixties reggae had established itself as mainstream pop music in Britain, and was increasingly recorded in this country by Dandy Livingstone, Eddy Grant and Greyhound etc.

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2/ REBEL MUSIC 
A look at reggae in the 1970s, when, ten years after independence from Britain and the harsh economic conditions were taking their toll, the disillusioned and dissatisfied Jamaican youth channeled their anger into roots music. The era gave rise to Bob Marley, the country’s first superstar, Lee “Scratch” Perry, reggae’s most notable producer, and King Tubby, who popularised ‘dub’, the remixing of existing records. In Britain, black youth latched on to the roots sound to create their own version, Brit reggae, with bands such as Steel Pulse and Aswad emerging.

3/ INNA DANCEHALL STYLE
Examines the progression of reggae after the death of Bob Marley, including the start of dancehall. In America reggae had a connection with hip-hop and DJ Shabba Ranks saw his popularity rise and fall. Looks at how Jamaican street styles have achieved a dominance in Britain and the rise of New Roots in Jamiaca.

- Strictly The Best

 

File under Blast From The Past, Culture, Hip-Hop, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG