Original | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe - Part 2

Schoolgirl Report aka Schulmädchen Report 70’s German Teen Softcore Sexploitation

Ernst Hofbauer (b. 22 August 1925 Vienna, Austria – d. 24 February 1984 Munich, Germany at age 58) was an Austrian film director.

During the early 1970s, in Munich, Hofbauer teamed with Walter Boos, Wolf C. Hartwig, and Ludwig Spitaler to produce the original thirteen films under the banner Schulmadchen Report (or Schoolgirl Report); the stories were adapted from books written by Guenther Hunold, while Guenther Heller composed the film script, Klaus Werner did the camera work, and the music was handled by Gert Wilden & Orchestra. Hofbauer and Boos were referred to as the ‘Titans of Teen Libido’. The films were classified as ‘sexploitation’, and were extremely popular, seen by more than 30 million people all over the world.

Schoolgirls Report 75

In the United States, the films were released in grindhouses and drive-ins, and the names of the films were changed to conform to American standards. Because the films focused on young girls who may have been under legal age in this country, the Schoolgirl Report series was eventually suppressed.

The Schoolgirl Report series was very interesting because the films portrayed many unknown teenagers and actresses who were vibrant, beautiful, naive, innocent, and unabashed. Most of the films related a series of vignettes to tell an interesting story. Hidden pedophile lust, co-ed skinnydipping, situations involving first-time sexual experiences, and encounters with teachers were all shown in the episodes. Interracial love affairs, male and female masturbation sequences, forced prostitution, rape, voyeurism, harmless erotic games, seduction, and erotic touching are also portrayed in the vignettes. Well-known German sex kitten Ingrid Steeger and the ever-horny Italian comic Rinaldo Talamonti play key roles in many of the vignettes. Rosl Mayr appears in almost all of the thirteen Schulmadchen Report films as an elderly lady with a comic role. She is perfectly cast as a comedic talent and is the only senior actress that plays a key element in many of the vignettes. Marie Ekorre, Sonja Jeannine, Christina Lindberg, and Birgit Tetzlaff are a few of the young actresses who titillate the audience with their erotic encounters. Friedrich von Thon conducted street interviews to discuss the plots in the vignettes, and many of the situations were followed up with a courtroom setting (the male actors were charged with statutory rape). The Schoolgirl Report films were classified as ‘soft-core’ eroticism, which is similar to the David Hamilton genre.

Ernst Hofbauer directed many erotic films in addition to the original thirteen Schulmadchen Report classics. Sex sells, and Hofbauer exploited consumer demand for R-rated movies involving young actors and actresses. He had a unique style that combined youth, eroticism, wit, and anecdote. His exploitation films of the 1970s appealed to moviegoers from all walks of life.

A chronological list of the original 13 Schoolgirl Report films follows:

  • ★ Schulmadchen Report I: What Parents Don’t Think is Possible, aka Schoolgirl Report Part I
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report II: What Keeps Parents Awake at Night, aka Schoolgirl Report Part II
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report III: What Parents Find Unthinkable, aka Schoolgirls Growing Up
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report IV: What Drives Parents to Despair, aka Campus Swingers
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report V: What All Parents Should Know, aka 14 and Under
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report VI: Erotic Young Lovers, aka Campus Pussycats
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report VII: But Heart Needs to Be There
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report VIII: What Parents Should Never Get to Know, aka Naughty Coeds
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report IX: Examination Before the Matriculation
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report X: Every Girl Starts Sometime
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report XI: Confessions of a Naked Virgin, aka Blue Dreams
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report XII: Young Girls Need Love, aka Blue Fantasies
  • ★ Schulmadchen Report XIII: Don’t Forget The Love When Having Sex

File under Blast From The Past, Fetish, History of Pornography, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 20, 2014

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Original Conan

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 19, 2014

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Action Park Is Back! The Most Insane Amusement Park Ever

Action Park Traction Park 6 Dead

Growin’ up in the tri-state area, everyone had a story of a relative or friend bein’ injured at Action Park, it was like a suburban legend. So craze to see it’s open again.

 

Action Park is an amusement park located in Vernon, New Jersey, USA. The park was open from 1978 until 1996 while it was owned and operated by Great American Recreation. In 1996, the park closed and was re-opened under new management in 1998 as Mountain Creek Resort and Crystal Springs Resort ski area. On April 2, 2014, the original management, who has since repurchased the property, announced that Mountain Creek Waterpark would be renamed back to Action Park beginning with the Summer 2014 season, based on an increasing rise in nostalgia, as current adults recount their experiences at the park in the 1980’s and 90’s.

Man Drowns In Wave Pool Action Park

The original Action Park featured three separate attraction areas: The Alpine Center, featuring an alpine slide, Motorworld, and Waterworld. The lattermost was one of the first modern American water parks. Many of its attractions were unique, attracting thrillseekers from across the New York City metro area. The park’s popularity went hand-in-hand with a reputation for poorly designed, unsafe rides; underaged, undertrained, and often under-the-influence staff; intoxicated, unprepared visitors; and a consequently poor safety record.

Action Park Injuries Up In '86

At least six people are known to have died as a result of mishaps on rides at the original park. It was given nicknames such as “Traction Park”, “Accident Park”, and “Class Action Park” by doctors at nearby hospitals due to the number of severely injured parkgoers they treated. Little action was taken by state regulators despite a history of repeat violations. In its later years personal-injury lawsuits forced the closure of more and more rides and finally the park itself in 1996.

Action Park Negligence

Weird New Jersey Action Park Memories

File under Blast From The Past, Childhood Memories, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Led Zeppelin Stairway To Heaven Opening Guitar Part Stolen?

Led Zeppelin are gettin’ sued for the opening guitar chord progression on Stairway To Heaven


Some say it sounds like this, also (at 3:00)

It’s not like they don’t have a history of bitin’

  • “Babe I’m Gonna Leave You” – A folk song by Anne Bredon, this was originally credited as “traditional, arranged by Jimmy Page,” then “words and music by Jimmy Page,” and then, following legal action, “Bredon/Page/Plant.”
  • “Black Mountain Side” – uncredited version of a traditional folk tune previously recorded by Bert Jansch.
  • “Bring It On Home” – the first section is an uncredited cover of the Willie Dixon tune (as performed by the imposter Sonny Boy Williamson).
  • “Communication Breakdown” – apparently derived from Eddie Cochran’s “Nervous Breakdown.”
  • “Custard Pie” – uncredited cover of Bukka White’s “Shake ‘Em On Down,” with lyrics from Sleepy John Estes’s “Drop Down Daddy.”
  • “Dazed And Confused” – uncredited cover of the Jake Holmes song (see The Above Ground Sound Of Jake Holmes).
  • “Hats Off To (Roy) Harper” – uncredited version of Bukka White’s “Shake ‘Em On Down.”
  • “How Many More Times” – Part one is an uncredited cover of the Howlin’ Wolf song (available on numerous compilations). Part two is an uncredited cover of Albert King’s “The Hunter.”
  • “In My Time Of Dying” – uncredited cover of the traditional song (as heard on Bob Dylan‘s debut).
  • “The Lemon Song” – uncredited cover of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor” – Wolf’s publisher sued Zeppelin in the early 70s and settled out of court.
  • “Moby Dick” – written and first recorded by Sleepy John Estes under the title “The Girl I Love,” and later covered by Bobby Parker.
  • “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” – uncredited cover of the Blind Willie Johnson blues.
  • “Since I’ve Been Lovin’ You” – lyrics are the same as Moby Grape‘s “Never,” though the music isn’t similar.
  • “Stairway To Heaven” – the main guitar line is apparently from “Taurus” by Spirit.
  • “White Summer” – uncredited cover of Davey Graham’s “She Moved Through The Fair.”
  • “Whole Lotta Love” – lyrics are from the Willie Dixon blues “You Need Love.”

File under Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

The Police Tapes South Bronx Fort Apache 70’s & 80’s NYC High Crime Ghetto Wasteland

Fort Apache The Bronx

NYPD 70's South Bronx

Fort Apache NYPD Bronx New York 41-precinct-jpg

NY Illustrated – Saturday Night At Fort Apache – March 4, 1973

‘Three types of people use the streets of the South Bronx after dark: Policemen, Criminals, and Potential Victims.’

One in this public affairs series devoted to issues that concern the greater New York area. This program profiles Police Precinct 41 in the South Bronx, nicknamed “Fort Apache” because of the frequency and severity of violent crimes committed in the surrounding area. Narrated by Norman Rose, the program begins with a clip of Sgt. Bill Taylor addressing officers of the precinct’s anti-crime unit. Later, accompanied by Rose, Taylor tracks down and arrests a suspected mugger. In interviews with officers stationed at and previously assigned to the precinct, the following topics are discussed: the high risk of incurring severe injury while on duty and the ability to cope with fear; the reluctance among members of the police force to be assigned to the 41st precinct; completing tenure at the precinct as a step toward promotion; the high incidence of illegal weapons possession among area residents; and the factors linking street crime with drugs and poverty. Also included is footage of a typical night at the Lincoln Hospital emergency room, where the number of people suffering from gunshot wounds and stabbings often exceeds the hospital’s nightly capacity. Among those interviewed are Deputy Inspector Matthew Neary and Officers James Finn, Bob Gardner, and Tony Imbimbo. Commercials deleted. (This series occasionally runs under the title “New Jersey Illustrated” or “Connecticut Illustrated”; series dates unverified.) – The Paley Center For Media

NYPD South Bronx NYC 70's

South Bronx NYPD 70's NYC

Fort Apache Bronx New York City Police Patch NYPD

The Police Tapes (1977)

The-Police-Tapes

The Police Tapes is a 1977 documentary about a police precinct in the South Bronx. The original ran ninety minutes and was produced for public television; a one-hour version later aired on ABC. It won two Emmy Awards, a Peabody Award, and a DuPont-Columbia University Award for Broadcast Journalism,and became an influence on later television and film dramas.

Filmmakers Alan Raymond and Susan Raymond spent three months in 1976 riding along with patrol officers in the 44thPrecinct of the South Bronx, which had the highest crime rate in New York City. They produced about 40 hours of videotape that they edited into a 90-minute documentary.

The result was what New York Times TV critic John J. O’Connor called a “startlingly graphic and convincing survey of urban crime, violence, brutality and cynical despair”. Cases followed include the discovery of a dead body on the street, the rescue of a mother trapped in her apartment by a mentally ill son, an attempt to negotiate with a woman armed with an improvised flail who refuses to stop threatening her neighbor, and the arrest of a 70-year-old woman accused of hitting her daughter in the face with an axe. There is some introductory narration at the beginning describing the neighborhood and the time the documentary was filmed, but some unifying commentary is provided by an interview with Bronx Borough Commander Anthony Bouza, who ascribes the crime rate in the 44th Precinct to poverty, describes the hardening effects of urban violence on idealistic police officers, and likens himself to the commander of an occupying army, saying “We are manufacturing criminals… we are manufacturing brutality”.

The production was financed by the New York State Council on the Arts and WNET and cost only $20,000, thanks to the use of Portapak tape equipment; it would have cost an estimated $90,000 if film had been used. Special Newvicon tubes in the video cameras allowed them to tape with only streetlights for illumination, making them less conspicuous to subjects who might otherwise have fled from or approached the cameras.

The Police Tapes was an important source for Fort Apache, The Bronx, a 1981 film with Paul Newman and Ed Asner. It influenced the deliberately ragged visual style of the 1980s television police drama Hill Street Blues, which used handheld cameras to provide a sense of realism and immediacy—particularly during the morning roll call in each episode, which was based on a similar scene in The Police Tapes. Robert Butler, who directed the first five episodes, urged the camera operators to avoid carefully composed shots and to move their cameras frequently, telling them “If you’re having trouble focusing, that’s great.” This mock-documentary style, in turn, influenced many other television dramas.

Another line of influence runs from The Police Tapes to the Fox Network reality TV series COPSCOPS, like its predecessor, closely follows police officers, suspects, and crime victims with handheld cameras. According to New York Times film critic Elvis Mitchell, the style of COPS then became part of the visual language of feature films, so that “the DNA of [the Raymonds’] original has found its way into the film mainstream.”

Fort Apache Protestor

Fort Apache the Bronx (1981) Paul NewmanFort Apache The Bronx 1981

File under Blast From The Past, Horror, New York City History, New York City Street Photography, NYC Nightlife, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB

Abandoned Bangkok Mall Now Flooded and Filled With Exotic Fish

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Exotic Fish Take Over Abandoned Bangkok Mall Basement

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“The mall was shut in 1997, and an unfortunate series of events occurred thereafter. The mall was set ablaze in 1999, causing some casualties and in 2004, one person was killed from collapsing debris during a partial demolition.

The mall’s fifth to eleventh floors were eventually dismantled to be in line with the original plan and New World has been roofless ever since.

With no roof, rainwater unsurprisingly collected in the basement. The pool of static water reared mosquitoes. Mosquitoes annoyed vendors in the neighborhood. To fix this problem, some vendors released a bunch of fish into the pool so as to curb mosquito breeding. Quickly, that bunch of fish reproduced into thousands.” – Source


File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Swamp Thing – Nickelodeon Video Comics (1979-1981)

Swamp-Thing-1-DC-1972

Video Comics (TV Series 1979–1981)

“Cameras panned over individual panels from stories selected from DC Comics while voiceover actors read the dialogue seen in the balloons. Comic books chosen for this treatment included “Adam Strange,” (Gardner Fox), “Nutsy Squirrel” (Woody Gelman) and “Sugar and Spike” (Sheldon Mayer). After story recommendations by Larry Hama, hundreds of pages from DC’s vaults were photostatted and then recolored with luminescent dyes. There was no animation and no alteration of the original B&W panels. Complete stories were shown, panel by panel, and most came from back issues of “Sugar and Spike.” Some “Adam Strange” and “Swamp Thing” stories had more extensive production work with the addition of sound effects and music. The live-action opening showed kids arriving at a store to buy comic books.” –IMDb

File under Animation, Comics, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG