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Stacia Blake Hawkwind Nude Dancer Psychedelic Amazon Godess

Stacia Hawkwind


Stacia (full name Stacia Blake), born 26 December 1952 in Ireland, was a dancer for the English rock group Hawkwind. She is now a professional artist.

Stacia joined the band in 1971; however accounts vary as to how and why she began working with the band. Liner notes to In Search of Space indicate that poet and lyricist Robert Calvert recruited her for live shows; other sources state that she was a friend of Nik Turner, saxophonist and flautist for the band. In 2012, Turner told Mojo Magazine, “I met Stacia for the first time at the Isle of Wight… She said, “Can I dance with you?” and I said, “Yeah, but you must take off all your clothes and paint your body.” She took all her clothes off but unfortunately I didn’t have any body paint. That was like her audition.” In an interview in British music magazine Melody Maker, Stacia herself stated that she attended a show and, inspired by the music, got on stage and performed an impromptu dance to the band’s music. She immediately became an integral part of the live show after joining in 1971.

According to a 1974 interview in Penthouse, Stacia was six feet (183 cm) tall and “happily bisexual”. She regularly augmented her visual impact by performing topless or nude, her body decorated in iridescent or luminescent paint. In a 2007 BBC Four documentary, Lemmy described her as 6 ft 2 inches (188 cm) tall with a 52 inch (132 cm) bust and a bookbinder by trade. The same documentary said that she was working as a petrol pump attendant in Cornwall when she joined the band.

Stacia regarded what she did with the band as interpretive dance, and was an integral part of the early to mid-1970s Hawkwind show, particularly during the Space Ritual era. She left Hawkwind in 1975 after touring with them for the Warrior on the Edge of Time album. Her departure, along with that of Lemmy (who went on to form Motörhead) and Robert Calvert, signaled the end of an era; though Calvert, after a guest appearance with the band at the Reading festival, decided to rejoin the band full-time towards the end of that year.

File under Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, Sex

REVOLUTION (1968) Hippie Documentary Haight Ashbury LSD 60’s San Francisco Scene

A documentary that explores the counterculture of San Francisco in the mid-1960’s

The sex is free. The pot is cheap. Everyone can afford the acid.

Revolution 1968
Peace, love and groovy, mind-altering drugs are the topics at hand in this San Francisco freak-out documentary. It’s a crude but heartfelt time capsule, released in the summer of ’68, just before the Haight Asbury scene turned into one big, unwashed bummer. And even if director Jack O’Connell (THE GREENWICH VILLAGE STORY, SWEDISH FLY GIRLS) may not have made a great movie, he was at the right time, at the right place, and (most important) with the right tripped-out attitude… Much of the movie is random footage of the hippie phenomenon, while a cute, blond, 20-year-old runaway named “Today Malone” provides a (slight) framework to this ragged mess. And a bigger bunch of long-haired, wide-eyed freaks I’ve never seen — crammed shoulder-to-shoulder, celebrating the summer solstice in the Golden Gate Park. God, the stench of patchouli must’ve been nauseating!

revolution 1968

Bands blast away, hippie chicks spin in circles, the lightshow begins, and it’s the same old acid haze we’ve come to know and love. Along the way, some interesting tidbits sneak in, including firsthand tales of getting busted, posted notes to runaway children, Ms. Malone unsuccessfully begging passers-by for spare change, a middle-aged nun describing how she’s similar to these “hippie girls,” and a typical hairball asked if he worries about chromosome damage from too much acid (when it’s, obviously, already too late). Of course, what movie about drugs is complete without a few suited “experts” (including San Francisco’s Director of Public Health and the thick-necked Chief of Police) warning about the evils of this new generation’s chemical dependence. But in the long run, this is a refreshingly pro-drug, pro-hippie pic that pushes the joys of LSD when Today doses on camera, and flies off on its mind-altering effects (actually, all they do is sit around a room, rolling their eyes and feeling a peach).

revolution 1968

The filmmakers have all the bases covered. They document the oddest niches of Hippiedom, which appeals to the curious. There are plenty of groovy visuals, in case you’re dosed. They even toss in some nude performance art to suck in the T&A crowd. It also features ragamuffin fashion at its worst (not as ratty as today’s Squatter Chic look, but close), plus music by Country Joe and The Fish, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and The Steve Miller Band… Nowadays, this nonsense is impossible to watch without laughing at these naive, burnt-out rebels, and it’s a reality check for folks who think the hippie subculture was exactly like PSYCH-OUT or THE TRIP. Unfortunately, real life was a lot less charismatic than reel life. And whenever one these wide-eyed innocents vows they’ll never conform to The System, I’ll give you odds that nowadays, they’re somewhere in suburbia, selling Amway products and falling asleep to AMERICA’S FUNNIEST HOME VIDEOS.

-Shock Cinema

revolution 1968

File under Culture, Fashion, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex

NOBODY FOR PRESIDENT!

Nobody for President!

 

Nobody keeps all campaign promises
As you read this, Nobody is in Washington working for you
I believe that Nobody should have that much power
I want Nobody to run my life
Nobody bakes Apple Pie better than my mom

as told by Wavy Gravy

 

File under Comedy, Culture, Influences, Kooky Characters, Massive Consumption of Drugs, Politricks, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Video Burn by Ant Farm (1975) TV Cadillac Car Crash Destruction Performance Art

 

“Media Burn” by Ant Farm. Excerpt from Ant Farm’s classic video art piece examining and satirizing the media, particularly the impact of television. On July 4, 1975, what a TV newscaster described as a “media circus” assembles at San Francisco’s Cow Palace Stadium. A pyramid of television sets are stacked, dowsed with kerosene, and set ablaze. Then a modified 1959 Cadillac El Dorado Biarritz, piloted by two drivers who are guided only by a video monitor between their bucket seats, crashes through the pyramid destroying the TV sets

 

Excerpt from Ant Farm’s classic video art piece examining and satirizing the media, particularly the impact of television. On the Fourth of July, 1975, artist-president John F. Kennedy (Doug Hall) delivers a speech about the media: “Now I ask you, my fellow Americans: Haven’t you ever wanted to put your foot through your television screen?” at San Francisco’s Cow Palace Stadium. You can watch the full video HERE.

When I saw this I realized The Plasmatics borrowed heavily from the piece for their video for ‘The Damned’

More on the art collective Ant Farm:

 

Ant Farm Wiki

File under Arts 'n Crafts, Blast From The Past, Culture, Fuck Art Let's Fuck, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG