Reconnaissance | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Rock Out With Yer Cock Out

  • A new device that links spy glasses, a webcam and a smart phone could make it easier for blind people to “see” shapes by converting visual signals to auditory ones and sending them to another part of the brain.
  • To open a door fitted with the latest U.S. government-certified lock from high-end Swiss lock manufacturer Kaba, an employee must both enter a code up to eight digits long, then swipe a unique identity card coded to comply with a new standard that requires an extra layer of security, one designed to track individual staffers and make covert intrusion harder than ever.Or, as lockpicking expert Marc Weber Tobias will show a crowd of hackers Friday, you can stick a wire in the tiny display light above the keypad and instantly render all of that “security” irrelevant.

  • Traditionally, young people have energized democratic movements. So it is a major coup for the ruling elite to have created societal institutions that have subdued young Americans and broken their spirit of resistance to domination.Young Americans—even more so than older Americans—appear to have acquiesced to the idea that the corporatocracy can completely screw them and that they are helpless to do anything about it. A 2010 Gallup poll asked Americans “Do you think the Social Security system will be able to pay you a benefit when you retire?” Among 18- to 34-years-olds, 76 percent of them said no. Yet despite their lack of confidence in the availability of Social Security for them, few have demanded it be shored up by more fairly payroll-taxing the wealthy; most appear resigned to having more money deducted from their paychecks for Social Security, even though they don’t believe it will be around to benefit them.

    How exactly has American society subdued young Americans?

  • Even in raucous Internet chat rooms, there are a few lines that just aren’t crossed. For example, don’t joke about broadcasting your own death live on the Web. Apparently, Lockport, New York’s Joseph Shepherd missed this part of Internet 101. (Or is that Common Sense 101?)According to the Daily Mail, Shepherd was arrested after allegedly pretending to commit suicide in a webcam-enabled chat room.

  • Nurseryman Nigel Hewitt-Cooper, from West Pennard, was inspecting his tropical garden when he discovered one of his pitcher plants had trapped the bird.He said he was “absolutely staggered” to find it had caught the creature.

    It is believed to be only the second time such a carnivorous plant has been documented eating a bird anywhere in the world.

  • Transportation Security Administration managers at Los Angeles International Airport are undergoing mandatory sensitivity training after a transgender employee alleged she was ordered to dress like a man, pat down male passengers and use the men’s restroom.Ashley Yang, 29, who spent two years as a security checkpoint screener at LAX, was fired last summer after co-workers observed her using the women’s room, according to a copy of her termination letter obtained by The Associated Press. She contested the firing, resulting in a settlement that mandated the training.

  • The U.S. Army didn’t bother to properly test five million body armor plates that were supposed to protect soldiers on the battlefield. In some cases, certain tests of the live-saving gear were ignored altogether.That’s according to a new report from the Defense Department Inspector General, which found that the Army office in charge of insuring the armor’s quality essentially fell asleep at the switch. Inserts were tested improperly and in some cases not at all. The testing flubs don’t prove that all five million plates are defective, but they deprive the Army of information about the reliability of a lot of equipment needed to protect troops in the field.

    “The Army cannot be sure that the appropriate level of protection has been achieved,” the report says. Now, it’ll go back and retest the vests, some of which were bought as long as seven years ago.

  • With access to pornography easier than ever before, politicians and scientists alike have renewed their interest in deciphering its psychological effects. Certainly pornography addiction or overconsumption seems to cause relationship problems [see “Sex in Bits and Bytes,” by Hal Arkowitz and Scott O. Lilienfeld; Scientific American Mind, July/August 2010]. But what about the more casual exposure typical of most porn users? Contrary to what many people believe, recent research shows that moderate pornography consumption does not make users more aggressive, promote sexism or harm relationships. If anything, some researchers suggest, exposure to pornography might make some people less likely to commit sexual crimes.
  • Police in Idaho Falls have told a man to stop wearing a bunny suit in public after people complained he has been frightening children.
    Residents in the northwestern U.S. city of 54,000 people also reported William Falkingham, 34, occasionally wears a tutu with the bunny suit, police said in a statement Tuesday.Police warned Falkingham after a woman said she saw him dressed in the costume, peeking at her young son from behind a tree and pointing his finger like a gun.While a police report said other residents were “greatly disturbed” by his activities, one neighbor defended Falkingham as eccentric but otherwise harmless.“He’s got the bunny outfit, a cowboy suit and a ballerina dress but you don’t see him except where he’s tripping through his backyard,” Deborah Colson told Reuters. “He’s got a strange lifestyle at home but we all do weird things at home.”

  • A churchgoer who left pork products outside a mosque during a hate campaign against Muslims has been put behind bars.John White, 63, left rashers of bacon outside the religious building in South Shields, and similar products outside worshippers’ homes.

  • Bigfoot spotters in New Jersey are reporting their own version of Sasquatch in ever-increasing numbers. Called “Big Red Eye” by locals, the sightings started in the 1970s and have been getting a little more attention lately, possibly due to the popularity of television shows heating up the subject.But New Jersey is no stranger to mysterious creatures stalking the extensive, and still somewhat remote, forests of the state. Their NHL team gets their name from the most pervasive legend, the New Jersey Devil. So this new Bigfoot legend is a relative newcomer.

  • Academics studied almost 500 people between 95 and 109 and compared them with over 3,000 others born during the same period.They found those who lived extremely long lives ate just as badly, drank and smoked just as much, took just as little exercise and were just as likely to be overweight as their long-gone friends.

  • Because of FBI’s actions against Anonymous and Lulzsec including several arrests, Now AntiSec supporters have targeted 77 law enforcement domains and walked away with everything on them. 77 domains were hosted on the same server. Few weeks before AntiSec targeted Arizona police departments, leaking personal information and other sensitive data, in response to immigration laws passed by the state. This time however, the latest law enforcement raid by AntiSec is in response to actions taken by the FBI.
  • Women buying fashionable essential oil burners are being blamed for a growing number of house fires, authorities have warned.
  • The film’s “miracle” drug may seem far-fetched, but it’s based in a medical reality: Taking certain medications, specifically those developed to treat psychiatric and neurological disorders, can boost cognitive performance in otherwise healthy people.Many of us instinctively recoil from such an idea for moral reasons. Sculpting our brains, unlike, say, sculpting our noses, seems like cheating. But consider this: 7 percent of surveyed college students (and some 25 percent of those on elite campuses) have taken an unprescribed Ritalin — or a similar drug used to treat attention deficit disorder — to boost their performance on an exam.

  • In a two-room shanty with no running water in northern Mumbai, Darshana Verma makes tea on a small stove. On a bench nearby, her 18-year-old son, Vishal, messages Facebook friends on the keypad of his Nokia smartphone.“This is the Internet age,” said the 36-year-old domestic helper, who spent more than half her $300 monthly income on Samsung Electronics Co. and Nokia Oyj (NOK1V) mobile phones for her children. “Facebook is there, all these things happen there now — they make friends, maybe they can even find jobs there.”

  • In a surprise move Monday night the city of Oak Hill eliminated its entire police department.The police chief and a few officers were under scrutiny for alleged illegal and odd behavior. The city council was so fed up they simply wiped out the entire department.

    The mayor called the special meeting Monday tonight that started with the trashing of the police chief and the mayor called for her termination. But then the board talked about it more and decided to get rid of the entire department.

  • A sequence of images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show many long, dark “tendrils” a few metres wide.They emerge between rocky outcrops and flow hundreds of metres down steep slopes towards the plains below.

    They appear on hillsides warmed by the summer sun, flow around obstacles and sometimes split or merge, but when winter returns, the tendrils fade away.

    This suggests that they are made of thawing mud, say the researchers.

    “It’s hard to imagine they are formed by anything other than fluid seeping down slopes,” said Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project Scientist Richard Zurek of Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, but they appear when it’s still too cold for fresh water.

  • The 140-year-old story of Greyfriars Bobby continues to draw tourists to the graveyard that was once inhabited by the Skye Terrier commemorated by a bronze fountain erected in his memory in the cemetery and immortalised on the silver screen by Walt Disney in a 1961 film.But Bondeson, a senior lecturer at Cardiff University, claims that Bobby was far from the dependable dog portrayed in the tale of undying Scottish devotion.

    He says the story was a fabrication, created by cemetery curator, James Brown, and restaurant owner, John Traill, to drum up custom for local businesses — and that Bobby was a stray mutt, bribed with food to stay in the graveyard.

  • The Renton City Prosecutor wants to send a cartoonist to jail for mocking the police department in a series of animated Internet videos.The “South-Park”-style animations parody everything from officers having sex on duty to certain personnel getting promoted without necessary qualifications. While the city wants to criminalize the cartoons, First Amendment rights advocates say the move is an “extreme abuse of power.”

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File under Animation, Fashion, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on August 6, 2011

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Royal Wedding Update

  • Those low-cost embedded tracking devices in your smartphone or those personal GPS devices that track the whereabouts of your children, car, pet, or shipment can easily be intercepted by hackers, who can then pinpoint their whereabouts, impersonate them, and spoof their physical location, a researcher has discovered.
  • If the system works as the government’s proposal says it should, there wouldn’t be much opportunity for Homeland Security to track your compartmentalized online information anyway. But there’s no denying that the government is currently pursuing two policies in cyberspace that now seem at odds with each other. On the one hand, it wants to make your online identity so secure and private — even more so than in the real world — that it swears even the government can’t track you. But on the other, federal law enforcement agencies are actively pursuing expanded powers to wiretap online communications.
  • One reason that Social Security numbers are so fouled up is that they’re used as both identifiers—a way to keep track of which Joseph Smith you are—and as authenticators—a way for your cell phone carrier to verify that you are, in fact, Joseph Smith when you call to change your plan. Alessandro Acquisti, the lead author on the recent SSN-cracking paper, makes an analogy to phone numbers. Your number, which you’re generally comfortable sharing with friends and colleagues, is a way of identifying you. The PIN number you punch in when you dial in to your voice mail is a way of authenticating that you’re the owner of that number. No rational person, of course, would choose a PIN number that’s the same as their phone number. But that’s the way Social Security numbers work.
  • The tens of thousands of cops, firefighters, construction workers and others who survived the worst terrorist assault in U.S. history and risked their lives in its wake will soon be informed that their names must be run through the FBI’s terrorism watch list
  • NASA scientists recently discovered an underground dry ice lake containing more carbon dioxide than originally thought. The trapped carbon dioxide is thought to have come from the planet’s atmosphere earlier in its history when it was conducive for life on Mars to exist.
  • “We’ll see who can stand against you,” reads the Hebrew line to the right corner of the picture.
  • Two people charged in a staged Texas bank heist apparently didn’t think twice when they typed messages in the “What’s on your mind?” portion of their Facebook pages, court documents show.

    “Get $$$(;.,” wrote bank employee Estefany Danelia Martinez, 19, two days before $62,201 was taken from the International Bank of Commerce in Houston, according to an affidavit from FBI Special Agent Kevin J. Katz.

    According to the affidavit, filed with a criminal complaint in federal court this week, her boyfriend, Ricky Gonzalez, 18, wrote on his page on March 24, the day after the robbery, “Wipe my teeth with hundereds (sic).”

  • News that teenagers purportedly playing “the knockout game” beat to death an elderly man in St. Louis brought back frightening memories for Karen Taylor.

    Taylor’s son, Adam, was similarly targeted in a parking garage in Columbia, Mo., in June 2009. A group of teens randomly ambushed the then-25-year-old, hitting him and kicking him as he lay on the ground writhing in pain. They told police they wanted to find an unsuspecting person and knock them out with one punch as part of a game called “Knockout King.”

  • Inked on the pudgy chest of a young Pico Rivera gangster who had been picked up and released on a minor offense was the scene of a 2004 liquor store slaying that had stumped Lloyd for more than four years.

    Each key detail was right there: the Christmas lights that lined the roof of the liquor store where 23-year-old John Juarez was gunned down, the direction his body fell, the bowed street lamp across the way and the street sign — all under the chilling banner of RIVERA KILLS, a reference to the gang Rivera-13.

    As if to seal the deal, below the collarbone of the gang member known by the alias “Chopper” was a miniature helicopter raining down bullets on the scene.

    Thanks Ramon.

  • Advertisements that promote products as luxurious or “high-end” have been banned in a move experts say is designed to protect social harmony.

    The clean up means commercials posted or aired in public can no longer include words like “supreme”, “royal”, “luxury” or “high class”, all of which frequently appear in Chinese promotions for real estate developments, vehicles and wines.

    According to a March 17 press release issued by the Beijing Administration for Industry and Commerce, officials will target advertisements that “promote hedonism” or “the worship of foreign-made products”.

  • A baby girl starves to death as her parents raise a virtual child online; a boy scolded for excessive gaming kills his mother then commits suicide — technology addiction is taking a toll in Asia.
  • Thanks NoFavorite.
  • The global economy and its recovery, and the living standards of millions of plain folks, are now at risk from the sudden rise in oil and commodity prices.

    Gas at the pump is up, and going higher. Food prices are following.

    The consequences are catastrophic for the global poor as their costs go up while their income doesn’t. It’s menacing American workers too, who in large part have not seen a meaningful raise since the days of Reagan (keeping it this way is clearly behind the current flurry of attacks on unions).

  • In case you haven’t noticed, the world is on the verge of a horrific global food crisis. At some point, this crisis will affect you and your family. It may not be today, and it may not be tomorrow, but it is going to happen. Crazy weather and horrifying natural disasters have played havoc with agricultural production in many areas of the globe over the past couple of years. Meanwhile, the price of oil has begun to skyrocket.

    The entire global economy is predicated on the ability to use massive amounts of inexpensive oil to cheaply produce food and other goods and transport them over vast distances. Without cheap oil the whole game changes. Topsoil is being depleted at a staggering rate and key aquifers all over the world are being drained at an alarming pace. Global food prices are already at an all-time high and they continue to move up aggressively. So what is going to happen to our world when hundreds of millions more people cannot afford to feed themselves?

  • President Barack Obama came to office on a tide of voters eager to see a change in more than just the White House’s occupant. Two years into his presidency — and one day after he launched his 2012 reelection campaign — and even some of his most ardent supporters are having trouble coming to terms with the answer to Sarah Palin’s 2010 question: “How’s that hopey, changey stuff working out?”
  • Among the non-invasive methods, tested on 109 subjects, so-called penile extenders that stretch the phallus through traction were shown to be most effective.

    One study reported an average increase of 1.8 centimetres (0.7 inches), while another measured an extra 2.3 centimetres (0.9 inches) in a flaccid state, and 1.7 centimetres (0.67 inches) when erect.

    But the regimen for achieving these gains was arduous: six hours of daily traction over four months in the first case, and four hours every day over six months in the second.

    Another device, known as a “penis pump,” uses a manual or motorised pump to create a vacuum inside a hard cylinder sheath, stretching the phallus.

  • Suspect is seen shooting teenager in Brownsville, Brooklyn.
  • The growing use of unmanned aircraft in combat situations raises huge moral and legal issues, and threatens to make war more likely as armed robots take over from human beings, according to an internal study by the Ministry of Defence.

    The report warns of the dangers of an “incremental and involuntary journey towards a Terminator-like reality”, referring to James Cameron’s 1984 movie, in which humans are hunted by robotic killing machines. It says the pace of technological development is accelerating at such a rate that Britain must quickly establish a policy on what will constitute “acceptable machine behaviour”.

  • Rotten Ronnies is a magnet for violence once again. Are people fightin’ over jobs at McDonalds?!
  • On April 15th the National Socialist Movement held our 2011 National Meeting. With approximately 80 Party members in attendance, along with a few respected guests we started our dinner in a Church Hall. We had a couple men posted outside to watch over the parking lot and building. It is well known that the ara, anarchists, and communist black block groups will attack cars and buildings, as well as women and children. Just before the meeting was to begin, an armed group of about 30 or more masked anarchists launched an attack upon the Church Hall, our Comrades, and one of the cars before we beat them back in (legal) self defense. The commie scum attacked us with 2 by 4 boards, mace, clubs, knives, bricks, tree branches, glass bottles, and other weapons.
  • The American Independent has previously reported on the growing corporatization of the incipient medical marijuana industry at a time when medical marijuana dispensaries scrabble to hold on to their businesses in the face of a multi-pronged federal crackdown. But there are signs afoot that it just may become ever more corporate if a Big Pharma push to get the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to recognize a cannabis-derived drug is successful.
  • Sonny Pierce was old school. The latest dating vehicles of the Internet age such as justachat or match.com weren’t his style. The 27-year-old Pierce of suburban Chicago preferred to troll for new talent via phone sex chat lines. And he apparently was a hit with the ladies…
  • Street Fighter 2 style
  • The parlour in Compton, southern California, lets mourners grieve through a bullet-proof glass chamber that is visible from the street.

    Peggy Scott Adams, owner of the Robert L. Adams Mortuary funeral home, said the 3.6m drive-through is a unique feature that sets the business apart from other parlours, the Los Angeles Times reports.

    “You can come by after work, you don’t need to deal with parking, you can sign the book outside and the family knows that you paid your respects,” said Scott Adams, whose parlour has been in business since 1974.

    “It’s a convenience thing.”

  • He tried to paint this victims car by removable paint. But the victim got really mad.
  • On 20 June 1942, the SS guard stationed at the exit to Auschwitz was frightened. In front of him was the car of Rudolph Höss, the commandant of the infamous concentration camp. Inside were four armed SS men, one of whom – an Untersturmführer, or second lieutenant, was shouting and swearing at him.

    “Wake up, you buggers!” the officer screamed in German. “Open up or I’ll open you up!” Terrified, the guard scrambled to raise the barrier, allowing the powerful motor to pass through and drive away.

    Yet had he looked closer, the guard would have noticed something strange: the men were sweating and ashen-faced with fear. For far from being Nazis, the men were Polish prisoners in stolen uniforms and a misappropriated car, who had just made one of the most audacious escapes in the history of Auschwitz. And the architect of the plot, the second lieutenant, was a boy scout, to whom the association’s motto “Be prepared” had become a lifeline.

  • Sixteen years ago Tom Klein was staring at a Woody Woodpecker cartoon, “The Loose Nut,” when he started seeing things.

    Specifically, Mr. Klein watched that maniacal red-topped bird smash a steamroller through the door of a shed. The screen then exploded into images that looked less like the stuff of a Walter Lantz cartoon than like something Willem de Kooning might have hung on a wall.

    “What was that?” Mr. Klein, now an animation professor at Loyola Marymount University, recalled thinking. Only later, after years of scholarly detective work, did he decide that he had been looking at genuine art that was cleverly concealed by an ambitious and slightly frustrated animation director named Shamus Culhane. Mr. Culhane died in 1996, a pioneer whose six decades in animation included the sequence of the dwarfs marching and singing “Heigh Ho” in the 1937 film “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”

  • A serendipitous discovery by academics at The University of Nottingham has shown that a simple illusion can significantly reduce — and in some cases even temporarily eradicate — arthritic pain in the hand.

    By tricking the brain into believing that the painful part of the hand is being stretched or shrunk, the researchers were able to halve the pain felt by 85 per cent of sufferers they tested.

    The research could point to new technologies of the future which could assist patients in improving mobility in their hand by reducing the amount of pain they experience while undergoing physiotherapy.

  • If you spend much time online, chances are you have stumbled upon photos often referred to as “The Marijuana house” or “The Great Tennessee Pot Cave”. The photos are of a seemingly normal house with a huge marijuana grow operation hidden in a cave beneath the house. While these pictures have made their rounds on the internet for years, details on the story behind the photos are vague at best. I have always wondered the real story behind the photos of this amazing setup. The full story.
  • “As far as soldiers go, he was the elite of the elite,” said Rustam Zaripon, manager of the Russian Baths in Brooklyn and a friend of escaped suspect Nikolai Rakossi.

    “He’s a very calm and powerful man,” Zaripon told the Daily News. “He served tours in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Africa.”

    Russian Army veteran Rakossi, 56, is wanted for the vicious weekend stabbing murders of Tatyana Prikhodko and her stunning daughter Larisa.

  • One county on the edge of the Missouri Ozarks seemed oddly immune to the scourge of methamphetamine ravaging the state, boasting few meth raids or arrests in recent years. Some residents now think they know why, after a meth bust landed the Carter County sheriff himself in jail.

    Tommy Adams, county sheriff for a little more than two years, was arrested earlier this month after giving meth to an informant at his cabin on a remote and hilly gravel road, according to a court document. He also allegedly snorted the drug himself with a straw. Authorities would not detail the extent of Adam’s alleged meth involvement, but charged him with meth distribution. He is being held in Cape Girardeau County jail on $250,000 bond.

  • Venice Beach, CA. LAPD Police officers were present at a large gathering of youth in Venice Beach for about an hour, then left. Shortly thereafter, people just started fighting and it quickly just turned into an all out brawl with knives and people hitting one another with skateboards and closed fists. LAPD moved back in to disperse the crowd.
  • The infamous killer, who started championing environmental causes from behind bars, bemoaned the ‘bad things’ being done to environment in a rambling phone interview from his Californian jail cell.

    ‘Everyone’s God and if we don’t wake up to that there’s going to be no weather because our polar caps are melting because we’re doing bad things to the atmosphere.

    ‘If we don’t change that as rapidly as I’m speaking to you now, if we don’t put the green back on the planet and put the trees back that we’ve butchered, if we don’t go to war against the problem…’ he added, trailing off.

    Manson, who described himself to his interviewer as a ‘bad man who shoots people’, brainwashed members of a commune known as The Family into butchering eight people including film director Roman Polanski’s pregnant wife Sharon Tate in July and August 1969.

  • Police in the southwestern Illinois city of Belleville say the videotaped attack of a 17-year-old student by two other riders on a school bus appears to be racially motivated.
  • The smell of marijuana smoke is no longer enough reason for police to order someone out of a car, now that pot has been decriminalized in Massachusetts, the state’s highest court said in a decision published on Tuesday.
  • Currently, Mars has a thin atmosphere dominated by carbon dioxide, with pressures at most of the planet’s surface so low that liquid water will immediately boil. But a variety of features we’ve discovered argue that the planet has once supported copious amounts of water, indicating that the planet’s atmosphere must have differed considerably in the past. Using radar data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, scientists have now found a potential resting place for some material that was once in the Martian atmosphere: a huge deposit at the south pole that holds nearly as much CO2 as the planet’s current atmosphere.
    Thanks Nico.
  • Governments that use nuclear energy are torn between the benefit of low-cost electricity and the risk of a nuclear catastrophe, which could total trillions of dollars and even bankrupt a country.

    The bottom line is that it’s a gamble: Governments are hoping to dodge a one-off disaster while they accumulate small gains over the long-term.

    The cost of a worst-case nuclear accident at a plant in Germany, for example, has been estimated to total as much as €7.6 trillion ($11 trillion), while the mandatory reactor insurance is only €2.5 billion.

    “The €2.5 billion will be just enough to buy the stamps for the letters of condolence,” said Olav Hohmeyer, an economist at the University of Flensburg who is also a member of the German government’s environmental advisory body.

  • MOCA’s exhibit, Art in the Streets (reviewed here), is the inaugural show of its new director, Jeffrey Deitch, a former New York gallery owner and art agent. Deitch’s now-shuttered Soho gallery showcased vandal-anarchist wannabes whose performance pieces and installations purported to strike a blow against establishment values and capitalism, even as Deitch himself made millions serving art collectors whose fortunes rested on capitalism and its underpinning in bourgeois values. MOCA’s show (which will also survey skateboard culture) raises such inconsistencies to a new level of shamelessness. Not only would MOCA never tolerate uninvited graffiti on its walls (indeed, it doesn’t even permit visitors to use a pen for note-taking within its walls, an affectation unknown in most of the world’s greatest museums); none of its trustees would allow their Westside mansions or offices to be adorned with graffiti, either.

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File under Animation, Culture, Graffiti, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on April 23, 2011

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Black Gold Warz

  • Totally disgusting. The middle east demonstrating how great a people they are once again. Now I guess we should give them all green cards next so they can “have a better life” in another country. Hopefully they’ll move next door to a bleeding heart & share casserole dishes, and pleasantries.
  • Savvy techies are finding ways to circumvent politically motivated shutdowns of the internet
  • “We’ve got at least 10 days to two weeks of potential drama before you can declare the accident over,” said Michael Friedlander, who worked as a nuclear plant operator for 13 years.

    Western nuclear engineers have become increasingly concerned about a separate problem that may be putting pressure on the Japanese technicians to work faster: salt buildup inside the reactors, which could cause them to heat up more and, in the worst case, cause the uranium to melt, releasing a range of radioactive material.

  • Never want to read another story about Lindsay Lohan or Charlie Sheen? Now there’s an app for that.

    “Silence of the Celebs,” a program created by Manhattan web design studio Gesture Theory, lets you filter out all mentions of a celebrity from online news sources just by entering their names.

  • A D.C. elementary school student was charged with possession of a controlled substance Thursday after being accused of taking cocaine to school and sharing it with four classmates who were hospitalized after ingesting the drug.
  • An Australian teen who had to shut down an event page on Facebook after more than 200,000 people RSVPed for her sweet 16 party now has more than 70,000 people who have signed up to attend her new party. The girl named Jess called police Monday to say her Facebook account had been hijacked after thousands said they’d attend her birthday party in Chatswood in New South Wales on March 26.
  • The celebrated American artist Richard Prince has been ordered to destroy works worth tens of millions of dollars after a court ruled that the paintings, which reworked a series of photographs by the French photographer Patrick Cariou, had breached copyright.

    A New York federal court has ruled that Prince and his gallery infringed Cariou’s copyright when he produced a series of works in a 2008 show using 35 pictures from the book Yes, Rasta, published by Cariou in 2000, “in their entirety, or nearly so”.

    Thanks KS

  • The app has become a gay phenomenon. Blog The New Gay called Grindr the “biggest change in gay hookups since the ‘hanky code'”.
  • Radiation leaking from Japan’s tsunami-damaged nuclear power plant has caused Tokyo’s tap water to exceed safety standards for infants to drink, officials said Wednesday, sending anxiety levels soaring over the nation’s food and water supply.

    Residents cleared store shelves of bottled water after Tokyo Gov. Shintaro Ishihara said levels of radioactive iodine in tap water were more than twice what is considered safe for babies. Officials begged those in the city to buy only what they needed, saying hoarding could hurt the thousands of people without any water in areas devastated by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

  • Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Wednesday it has observed a neutron beam, a kind of radioactive ray, 13 times on the premises of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after it was crippled by the massive March 11 quake-tsunami disaster.

    TEPCO, the operator of the nuclear plant, said the neutron beam measured about 1.5 kilometers southwest of the plant’s No. 1 and 2 reactors over three days from March 13 and is equivalent to 0.01 to 0.02 microsieverts per hour and that this is not a dangerous level.

    The utility firm said it will measure uranium and plutonium, which could emit a neutron beam, as well.

    In the 1999 criticality accident at a nuclear fuel processing plant run by JCO Co. in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture, uranium broke apart continually in nuclear fission, causing a massive amount of neutron beams.

  • The Manichai Daily news reports that the Japanese government has in its possession video footage of the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant taken by a U.S. military reconnaissance drone, but has yet to release the footage to the public, sources have revealed.
  • In 2004, Barton reportedly married a Rhode Island woman, whom he’d met about a year earlier online. Not long after their wedding, Barton mysteriously removed his new bride from his Facebook account, and then vanished from her life altogether (he simply did not return home from work one day). Prior to his disappearance, the two discussed getting a divorce by letter and later by phone, but neither ever filed the requisite paperwork.

    Out of curiosity, the abandoned woman decided to do some stalking on Facebook, where she soon discovered photos from Barton’s second wedding in July 2010 on the pages of his friends and family. The Rhode Island woman contacted police, who arrested the alleged bigamist.

  • Joe Konrath, who we’ve written about numerous times, and Barry Eisler (who we haven’t…), contacted me late last week to pass on the fascinating news that Eisler, who has been a NY Times Best Selling author of a variety of thrillers, has turned down a $500,000 publishing deal from a mainstream publisher, in order to self-publish his next book. That’s a lot of money to give up. The link is to a (long, but fascinating) dialog between Konrath and Eisler, discussing the thinking behind passing up that kind of money to go the self-publishing route. The key takeaway: the $500,000 comes with strings (as does any publishing deal), and in this case, Eisler feels he’s likely to be better off on his own.
  • A Beijing entrepreneur, discussing restaurant choices with his fiancée over their cellphones last week, quoted Queen Gertrude’s response to Hamlet: “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.” The second time he said the word “protest,” her phone cut off.

    He spoke English, but another caller, repeating the same phrase on Monday in Chinese over a different phone, was also cut off in midsentence.

    A host of evidence over the past several weeks shows that Chinese authorities are more determined than ever to police cellphone calls, electronic messages, e-mail and access to the Internet in order to smother any hint of antigovernment sentiment. In the cat-and-mouse game that characterizes electronic communications here, analysts suggest that the cat is getting bigger, especially since revolts began to ricochet through the Middle East and North Africa, and homegrown efforts to organize protests in China began to circulate on the Internet about a month ago.

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No Nukes Is Good Nukes

  • If you’re wondering, yes, the desk you see him with his dirty shoes on is the historic Resolute Desk, made from the timbers of the British Frigate HMS Resolute and given as a gift to the United States by Queen Victoria in 1856.
  • A woman in western Sweden who drank two cups of soured milk has been unable to eat for days after a condom later slipped out of the package of the popular Swedish dairy product.
  • Ain’t nothing wrong with a 4-year-old Suri Cruise chomping on PENIS-SHAPED gummies — at least according to the company that makes the adult-themed treats.
  • Thousands of sardines, anchovies, stripped bass and mackerel surged along the coast of the Mexican resort in an event believed to be linked to the devastating Japanese tsunami.

    Delighted fishermen rushed out in wooden motor boats, abandoning their rods and nets and simply scooping the fish up with buckets.

  • Al-Qaeda has launched a women’s magazine that mixes beauty and fashion tips with advice on suicide bombings.

    Dubbed ‘Jihad Cosmo’, the glossy magazine’s front cover features the barrel of a sub-machine gun next to a picture a woman in a veil.

    There are exclusive interviews with martyrs’ wives, who praise their husbands’ decisions to die in suicide attacks.

    The slick, 31-page Al-Shamikha magazine – meaning The Majestic Woman – has advice for singletons on ‘marrying a mujahideen’.

  • A CAT with a heart-shaped marking on its side is looking for love, or at least a new home, as one of the abandoned pets at a Plymouth home.
  • HE IS an emperor penguin chick whose change of plumage into adulthood has blessed him with a white heart-shaped patch on his chest.
  • One of the major goals of the collider is to find the elusive Higgs boson: the particle that physicists invoke to explain why particles like protons, neutrons and electrons have mass. If the collider succeeds in producing the Higgs boson, some scientists predict that it will create a second particle, called the Higgs singlet, at the same time.

    According to Weiler and Ho’s theory, these singlets should have the ability to jump into an extra, fifth dimension where they can move either forward or backward in time and reappear in the future or past.

    “One of the attractive things about this approach to time travel is that it avoids all the big paradoxes,” Weiler said. “Because time travel is limited to these special particles, it is not possible for a man to travel back in time and murder one of his parents before he himself is born, for example. However, if scientists could control the production of Higgs singlets, they might be able to send messages to the past or future.”

  • I am roughly sixty to seventy kilometers due west from the nuclear plants that the Japanese authorities are struggling so hard to control. I witnessed two military helicopters fly over. Now, I am watching those same helicopters dropping water and attempting to cool those plants on the in-dash television of my car. This is as close as I am able to get to the plant. The video shows the needle of my Bicron PGM slamming the right side of the meter. I was taught in specialized training for this trip that, if this happened, I was to flee the area.
  • Mark your calendar. On March 19th, a full Moon of rare
    size and beauty will rise in the east at sunset. It’s a super
    “perigee moon”–the biggest in almost 20 years.
  • Gregory Jaczko, the top U.S. nuclear regulator, cast doubt on efforts to cool overheating reactors, saying workers may be hit with “lethal doses” of radiation.

    “It would be very difficult for emergency workers to get near the reactors,” Jaczko said.

    A United Nations forecast projects the radioactive plume from the Fukushima facility would reach the Aleutian Islands on Thursday and hit Southern California late on Friday, The New York Times reported.

    The projection, calculated on Tuesday and obtained by the newspaper, gives no information about actual radiation levels, it said. Health and nuclear experts emphasize that radiation in the plume will be diluted as it travels and will have extremely minor health consequences in the United States, it reported.

    The U.S. military has ordered its forces to stay 50 miles away from the plant, the Pentagon said. There are at least 55,000 members of the U.S. forces in Japan and offshore assisting the relief operation.

  • Has it occured to anyone that The disasters in Japan have been created by mother nature? Whales and Dolphin have been brutally slaughtered by the Japanese fishing industry and now they’ve had enough! Whales and dolphins have been found to hold great intelligence in scientific studies. No one knows how intelligent they actually are but it has been thought that they may be on Par with the human race. Its possible whales and dolphins have gotten to the point twhere they are tired of their companions being murdered in cold blood and have found a way to strike back. No one knows what exactly lies at the bottom of the pacific ocean, is it possible whales and dolphins have harvested Atlantean/Alien technology to utter destroy Japan with a quake/tsunami? I really believe we need to start looking closer into the connection of the slaughter of these beautiful intelligent animals and the disaster that struck Japan. hell hath no wrath like a womans scorn.
  • A California man was turned away after he attempted to pay his $6,500 credit card bill with pennies.

    Thirry Chahez loaded 650,000 pennies in his vehicle and drove to a local Chase Bank in an attempt to pay his credit card bill that was due on Monday.

    “Money’s money isn’t it,” Chahez said. “Different time, different branches and they all send me away and have a very bad attitude.”

    Initially, Chahez was told he needed to roll the coins, and he said he has tried to make the payment for days.

    “I brought them back, and now they’re rolled and they still don’t want them,” Chahez said. “Does my pennies stink?”

  • Hundreds of child abusers have been arrested and many jailed during the three-year, global operation.

    The investigation exposed more than 70,000 network members in the UK, the United States, Australia, New Zealand and Brazil, where first evidence of the crimes emerged.

    The Australians charged with involvement in the ring were aged from 19 to 84 years old.

    Grant Edwards, of the Australian Federal Police, said: “These are heinous sexual predators.”

  • The Japanese government’s radiation report for the country’s 47 prefectures Wednesday had a notable omission: Fukushima, ground zero in Japan’s nuclear crisis. Measurements from Ibaraki, just south of Fukushima, were also blanked out.

    Radiation experts in the USA say that the lack of information about radioactivity released from the smoldering reactors makes it impossible to gauge the current danger, project how bad a potential meltdown might be or calculate how much fallout might reach the USA.

  • THE Japanese owner of the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant falsified safety data and “dishonestly” tried to cover up problems there.

    Tokyo Electric Power Co injected air into the containment vessel of Fukushima reactor No 1 to artificially “lower the leak rate”. When caught, the company expressed its “sincere apologies for conducting dishonest practices”.

    The misconduct came to light in 2002 after whistleblowers working for General Electric, which designed the reactor, complained to the Japanese government. Another GE employee later confessed that he had falsified records of inspections of reactor No1 in 1989 – at the request of TEPCO officials. He also admitted to falsifying other inspection reports, also on request of the client. After that incident TEPCO was forced to shut down 17 reactors, albeit temporarily.

  • During debate over a bill that would legislate a dress code for Florida students, Passidomo blamed the alleged gang raping of an 11-year-old in Cleveland, Texas on the way the young girl was dressed.

    “There was an article about an 11 year old girl who was gangraped in Texas by 18 young men because she was dressed like a 21-year-old prostitute,” Passidomo declared.

    “And her parents let her attend school like that. And I think it’s incumbent upon us to create some areas where students can be safe in school and show up in proper attire so what happened in Texas doesn’t happen to our students,” she added.

  • This stunning image is the most detailed look at the far side of the moon to date.

    It comprises over 15,000 wide angle camera (WAC) photos taken between November 2009 and February 2011 by Nasa’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC).

  • He owes $455,203.14 to cover the costs of his stay at the Stateville Correctional Center in Joliet. Hawkins has been in prison since Nov. 19, 1982. His jailer is also his debt collector.

    Hawkins is fighting in court to stop the state from seizing about $11,000 in his bank account to partially satisfy the debt. The 60-year-old earned the money by working while he’s been behind bars, making about $75 a month.

    The issue of whether the state can repossess the meager wages paid to inmates will be determined by the Illinois Supreme Court, which will hold arguments in the Hawkins case Tuesday. It’s the first time the court will address the issue, which also has social justice and public policy ramifications for Illinois.

  • A doctor trapped in Bahrain’s main hospital has described how Saudi troops have surrouded the building and are preventing protestors suffering bullet wounds from being appropriately treated
  • Several Egyptians reported finding a whole room full of what appeared to be sex tapes. A photo posted on Twitter showed one tape labelled: “Sexual encounter between a Kuwaiti princess and an Egyptian man.”
    A man shows off an electric baton and handcuffs he found at state security [Twitter] The building also contained stark evidence of the torture and abuse many detainees suffered inside. One photograph from Twitter showed a man holding up an electric baton and a cache of handcuffs. Another photo showed a barren cell, with nothing but a toilet in the floor and a tap against the wall for drinking and washing. 

    El-Shamy said protesters found a closet full of “belly-dancing outfits”, which he speculated were used for some kind of “psychological torture”.

  • Building parts for Patriot missile systems was just a warm-up, apparently, for a government-owned company that relies on federal inmates making as little as 23 cents an hour. On Wednesday, the U.S. Army announced that it handed Federal Prison Industries a no-bid, nearly $20 million contract to build body armor.

    It’s the latest in a decades-long string of military deals for FPI, also known as Unicor. Over the years, the company has supplied parts for F-15 and F-16 fighter jets, the Cobra attack helicopter, and the iconic Patriot interceptor system. (More about that in a second.)

    But this deal is particularly odd, because FPI’s track record with protective equipment is, to put it generously, uneven. In May of last year, the Army recalled 44,000 FPI-made protective helmets after they failed ballistic testing. FPI then promptly got out of the helmet business.

  • With sodium thiopental in short supply nationally, Georgia corrections officials ordered the drug from a pharmaceutical distributor in London, England, DeYoung attorney John Bentivoglio wrote in the February 24 letter.

    The state received 50 vials of sodium thiopental in July, Bentivoglio said, citing public records.

    But Bentivoglio said the state was not registered to import the controlled substance and failed to notify DEA about the shipment.

    “I think it raises very troubling questions about the lengths to which they would go to pursue lethal injections when that process requires careful attention to the integrity of the process,” Bentivoglio told Reuters on Tuesday.

    Totonchi said her center first raised questions about the state of Georgia’s purchase from England in federal court filings for death row inmate Emmanuel Hammond, who was executed in January.

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Fiend Without a Face (1958) Mad Science Spawns Evil Fiends!

This was one of my favorite Horror/Sci-Fi films as a kid.

How can you not love the awesome stop-motion animated brain creatures?!

An American military base in Canada is developing a missile control system based on nuclear energy and is facing problem with the people from the nearby town. When four locals, including the Mayor, are killed, Major Jeff Cummings (Marshall Thompson) is in charge of the investigation. When the coroner examines the one of the corpse, he finds that the brain and spinal chord was sucked out and Major Cummings defines the creature as a mental vampire. He looks for Prof. R. E. Walgate (Kynaston Reeves), a retired scientist that lives in town, and he discloses the scary secret.

-IMDb


The Trailer

The Movie


Fiend Without a Face

File under Animation, Arts 'n Crafts, Blast From The Past, Cult Movies, Influences, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB