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Charles Manson Superstar (1989)

Charles Manson Superstar is a documentary film about Charles Manson, directed by Nikolas Schreck in 1989. Most of the documentary (the entire interview) was filmed inside San Quentin Prison. Schreck narrated the segments while images were shown, and music played in the background. There was brief footage of Spahn Ranch, and a short clip of James M. Mason being interviewed about the Universal Order, and Manson. Olivier Messiaen‘s “Death and Resurrection,” Bobby Beausoleil‘s “Lucifer Rising,” Krzysztof Penderecki‘s “Apocalypsis,” and Anton La Vey‘s “The Satanic Mass,” and Manson’s own songs “Clang Bang Clang” and “Mechanical Man” from the album LIE The Love and Terror Cult, were played during the film.

 

 

For forty years, Charles Manson has survived most of his life in what he calls ‘the hallways of the all ways,’ the reform schools, jails and prisons that have been his home and tomb. His thought was born in the hole of solitary confinement, apart from time and beyond the grasp of society. In his cell, he created his own world and speaks his own language: he has concluded that there is only the mind. This DVD will relinquish to you the extreme story of the killer of all killers: Charles Manson. From convincing his followers to move into the desert to train for the apocalypse, to leading a murderous crew through a string of devilish murders, you will see and hear from Manson himself of how he created a preconceived terror based on his philosophy of life. Manson claims that the so-called ‘straight’ world outside of prison is but an inverted reflection of the underworld in which he has lived. To him, the reality that presidents and law-abiding citizens accept begins in the hermetic alternate universe of criminals, cons and outlaws. Much as simplistic historians have dismissed Hitler’s 3rd Reich as the overcompensation of a failed artist, Manson’s vision of a holy war has been generally categorized as nothing more than the jealous rage of a spurned musician.

 

File under Cult Movies, Cults, Kooky Characters, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex

Born Innocent (1974) Linda Blair Gets Raped In Juvie 70’s TV Movie

Born Innocent was a television movie which was first aired under the NBC World Premiere Movie umbrella on September 10, 1974. Highly publicized and controversial, Born Innocent was the highest-rated television movie to air in the United States in 1974. The movie dealt with the physical, psychological and sexual abuse of a teenage girl, and included graphic content never before seen on American television at that time.

The movie starred Linda Blair (fresh off her success with The Exorcist) as a teenage runaway, who was eventually sentenced to do time in a juvenile detention center, which doubled as a reform school for the girls. Blair’s character, Christine Parker, came from an abusive home. Her father (played by Richard Jaeckel) beat her, which caused Chris to run away many times. Her mother (Kim Hunter) was unfeeling, sitting in her recliner, watching television and smoking cigarettes all day. While the movie has a morality play tone, showing the harsh effects of the detention center on a young girl, it also blames society for Christine’s downfall, as her social worker does not find out that her parents caused her to run away, and then had her sent off to reform school when she told others.


Original Airdate: Tuesday September 10, 1974 on NBC (National Broadcasting Company)


Controversial Scene
One scene in particular that gained the movie infamy was the rape of Blair’s character in the communal showers by a girl gang led by lesbian Denny (Janit Baldwin) with a plunger handle; this scene had the distinction of being the first all-female rape scene aired on American television. This scene was not glossed over in promotional spots for the movie; Linda Blair’s screams as she was being attacked were aired in the promos, with the announcer intoning, “She was born innocent, but that was fourteen years ago!”
The scene drew much outcry on its first airing and was eventually pulled from the movie entirely when it was blamed for the rape of a nine-year-old girl, committed by some of her peers with a glass soda pop bottle. The California Supreme Court would declare the film was not obscene, and that the network which broadcast it was not liable for the actions of the persons who committed the crime. Olivia N. v. National Broadcasting Company, 126 Cal. App.3d 488 (1981).

 

 

File under Blast From The Past, Cult Movies, Fetish, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex, Trash TV

Juvenile Delinquent Pulp Covers



File under SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG