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RanXerox – 80’s Italian Ultraviolent Cyberpunk AntiHero

 

 

hq-ranxerox-editora-conrad-edico-de-luxo_MLB-F-3229357352_102012

 

 

RanXerox is a science fiction graphic novel series by Stefano Tamburini and Tanino Liberatore, two Italian artists who had worked on such magazines as Cannibale and Frigidaire. Conceived as a bizarre antihero, RanXerox was a mechanical creature made from Xerox photocopier parts.

ranxerox

At first (1978, in Italian, in Cannibale) the name was “Rank Xerox“, identical to that of a joint venture between the Xerox Corporation of the U.S. and the Rank Organisation of the U.K., the latter of which manufactures and markets Xerox equipment in Europe. Due to a threatened lawsuit by Rank Xerox for using their trademarked name, Tamburini changed it to “RanXerox” (1980, also in Italian, in Frigidaire). The name “Ranx” has also been used in some cases.

ranxerox

The first time RanXerox was published in English was in the July 1983 issue ofHeavy Metal. Many more issues of Heavy Metal, as well as novels followed, featuring RanXerox (such as “RanXerox in America”). The artist uses Pantone pens to create his unique style of art.

RanXerox Heavy Metal

Richard Corben said about the character:

RanXerox is a punk, futuristic Frankenstein monster, and with the under-aged Lubna, they are a bizarre Beauty and the Beast. This artist and writer team have turned a dark mirror to the depths of our Id and we see reflected the base part of ourselves that would take what it wants with no compromise, no apology – and woe to the person who would cross us. But it is all done with a black, wry, satirical sense of humor.

ranxerox

Tanino Liberatore also created the artwork for the Frank Zappa album The Man from Utopia; the image of Zappa on the cover bears a strong resemblance to RanXerox.

The_Man_From_Utopia

Ranxerox 1 by grotovski

Ranxerox 2 by grotovski

File under Arts 'n Crafts, Blast From The Past, Influences, Punksploitation, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, Sex

Les Idoles (1968) French yé-yé Freakbeat

Les Idoles was based on a popular stage play performed by the Center for Theater & Experimentation on Actor Performance founded by Marc’O (aka Marc-Gilbert Guillaumin) who also directed the film version of Les Idoles in 1968. The film’s stars were all originally members of Marc’O’s avant-garde theater group and in many ways Les Idoles was an accumulation of the work they did together on stage. This psychedelic musical satire serves as both a critique and inadvertently a celebration of French pop music and yé-yé culture in the sixties, which seemed to fuel the revolutionary spirit in French youth while also offering up easy escapism. Les Idoles apparently received a warm reception in France when it debuted in 1968, but for one reason or another the movie was never released in the United States.

The film centers around the rise and fall of three pop stars who sing and dance their way through Les Idoles. Pierre Clémenti plays the unruly and rebellious Charly “the Knife” le Surineur who is supposedly based on the real French pop idol Johnny Hallyday and the lovely Bulle Ogier plays the kooky, sweet and naive Gigi “the Mad” la Folle who seems to be a combination of two popular yé-yé girls; Sylvie Vartan and France Gall. And finally there is Jean-Pierre Kalfon as the singer with psychic powers known as Simon “the Magician” le Magicien. Although the quality of the musical numbers in Les Idoles varies, the three leading actors give some of their most energetic and sensational performances in this uncompromising musical.

– Cinebeats

 

File under Cult Movies, Culture, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB

René Laloux and Roland Topor – Animation Fantastique

René Laloux (July 13, 1929–March 14, 2004) was a French animator and film director.
He was born in Paris in 1929 and went to art school to study painting. After some time working in advertising, he got a job in a psychiatric institution where he began experimenting in animation with the interns. It is at the psychiatric institution that he made 1960’s Monkey’s Teeth (Les Dents du Singe), in collaboration with Paul Grimault’s studio, and using a script written by the Cour Cheverny’s interns.

Another important collaborator of his was Roland Topor with whom Laloux made Dead Time (Les Temps Morts, 1964), The Snails (Les Escargots, 1965) and his most famous work, the feature length Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage, 1973).

Laloux also worked with Jean Giraud (Mœbius) to create the lesser known film Les Maîtres du temps (Time Masters) in 1981. Laloux’s 1988 film, Gandahar, was released in the US as Light Years. The US version was redubbed by Harvey Weinstein, from a screenplay adapted by Isaac Asimov. The US version was not as successful as the French version, grossing less than $400,000 on its release.

Laloux died of a heart attack on March 14, 2004 in Angoulême, Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France.

-Wikipedia

Roland Topor (January 7, 1938 – April 16, 1997), was a French illustrator, painter, writer and filmmaker, known for the surreal nature of his work. He was of Polish Jewish origin and spent the early years of his life in Savoy where his family hid him from the Nazi peril.

-Wikipedia

Les Temps morts aka Dead Times (1964)

httpvp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=FAD73867DAA1FCEF

Les Escargots (1965)

La planète sauvage aka Fantastic Planet (1973)

httpvp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=7AB3DD5157444692



File under Animation, Arts 'n Crafts, Blast From The Past, Cult Movies, Culture, Influences, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB

Mike Jittlov – The Wizard Of Speed And Time

Born in Los Angeles, Jittlov became a math-language major at UCLA. Jittlov took an animation course to satisfy his art requirement. He made a super-8 film, The Leap, enlarged to 16mm to participate in film festivals in the early 70s. Jittlov entered a 16mm film made for his UCLA class, Good Grief, into Academy Awards competition. That short made it to the professional finals for nomination, the first of several of his short films to do so. Afterwards, Jittlov bought his own 16mm movie camera, designed his own multiplane animation system for $200, and began his career.

Some of his other original film shorts, including The Interview, Swing Shift, Animato, and Time Tripper (released separately and as a collection called Animato) won many top awards and repeat film festival screenings, bringing him to the attention of The Walt Disney Studio. In 1978, Jittlov co-starred on Disney’s two-hour TV extravaganza, Mickey’s 50th, with the short film Mouse Mania, creating and animating the first stop-motion Mickey Mouse, along with 1,000 other Disney toys marching around a psychiatrist’s office. The short is now featured on the Disney DVD Mickey Mouse in Living Color, Volume Two. Since Disney did not allow usually individual creators to receive credit on their television productions (preferring a generic thanks to “the many Disney animators who made this possible”) Mike put his and partner Deven Cheregino’s name on the toys in the final production number, where they couldn’t be edited out. In late 1979, he co-starred again on Disney’s Major Effects television special – this time introducing the world to the 500 mph Green “Wizard of Speed and Time” via the short film version. With an improved soundtrack, the short was released to 16mm film collectors in 1980, along with four of his other short films.

Jittlov is best known for his feature movie The Wizard of Speed and Time, which he directed and starred in. The movie did poorly in theatres but has established a cult following since its release on videotape and laserdisk.

-Wikipedia

Check out his official site for more info: wizworld.com


The Wizard Of Speed And Time

File under Animation, Arts 'n Crafts, Cult Movies, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB

The Atomic Cafe (1982) Cold War Propaganda Films Remixed Into Anti-Nuke Propaganda

One of the defining documentaries of the 20th century, THE ATOMIC CAFE (1982) offers a darkly humorous glimpse into mid-century America, an era rife with paranoia, anxiety, and misapprehension. Whimsical and yet razor-sharp, this timeless classic illuminates the often comic paradoxes of life in the “Atomic Age,” while also exhibiting a genuine nostalgia for an earlier and more innocent nation.

Narrated through an astonishing array of vintage clips and music–from military training films to campy advertisements, presidential speeches to pop songs–the film revolves around the threat–and thrill–of the newly minted atomic bomb. Taking aim at the propaganda and false optimism of the 1950s, the film’s satire shines most vividly in the clever image splicing, such as footage of a decimated Hiroshima alongside cheerful suburban “duck-and-cover” routines. More than anything else, THE ATOMIC CAFE shows how nuclear warfare infiltrated the living rooms of America, changing the nation from the inside out.

Immensely entertaining and devilishly witty, THE ATOMIC CAFE serves up a revealing slice of American history: the legendary decade when we learned to live in a nuclear world.


The Atomic Cafe

File under Cult Movies, Influences, Music, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB

Wizards (1977) Ralph Bakshi Bites Vaughn Bode

Wizards is a 1977 American animated post-apocalyptic science fiction/fantasy film about the battle between two wizards, one representing the forces of magic and one representing the forces of technology. It was written, produced, and directed by Ralph Bakshi. This is 20th Century Fox’s first animated film.” –Wikipedia

“In a post apocalyptic future that appears as a blend of World War II Europe and J.R.R. Tolkien‘s Middle-earth, a pint-size wizard named Avatar must save the world from a band of fascist mutants controlled by his evil twin brother, Blackwolf, who likes to confuse enemy armies by projecting films of Adolf Hitler speeches during attacks. Painted live-action footage of advancing Nazi armies contrasts with Saturday-morning-cartoon-style animation of fairies and elves as Avatar travels through various magical and radioactive realms on his quest. Aiding him are a sexually promiscuous fairy queen, a hot-blooded warrior elf and Peace, a misunderstood robot rebelling against his Blackwolf-controlled programming. A bizarre and psychedelic meditation on magic vs. technology, this ultimate futuristic fantastic epic cult film still finds an audience on college campuses and will prove quite rewarding to viewers in the right frame of mind.” –IMDb

Trailer

Movie


Buy Wizards (1977) Here

File under Animation, Cult Movies, Graffiti, Influences, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB