William Shatner | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Go Ask Alice (1973) Diary Of A 70’s Teenage Girl Runaway Drug Addict

Go Ask Alice is a controversial 1971 book about the life of a troubled teenage girl. The book purports to be the actual diary of an anonymous teenage girl who became addicted to drugs, and is presented as a testimony against drug use. The diarist’s name is never given in the book.

The story caused a sensation when published and remains in print as of 2011. Revelations about the book’s origin have caused much doubt as to its authenticity and factual accounts, and the publishers have listed it as a work of fiction since at least the mid-late 1980s. Although it is still published under the byline “Anonymous”, press interviews and copyright records suggest that it is largely or wholly the work of its purported editor, Beatrice Sparks. Some of the days and dates referenced in the book put the timeline from 1968 until 1970.

The title is from the lyrics to the Jefferson Airplane song “White Rabbit“. Grace Slick wrote the song based on perceived drug references in the classic novel Alice In Wonderland. (On July 14 [page 36 of the 2006 edition], the writer says she “feel[s] like Alice in Wonderland” and “maybe Lewis G. Caroll [sic] was on drugs too.”)

The book was made into an ABC Movie of the Week in 1973.

Look for brief appearances from future AMERICAN GRAFFITI stars MacKenzie Phillips (as a 14-year-old doper) and Charlie Martin Smith (playing a student in search of drugs), plus Robert Carradine as a long-haired stoner.


File under Blast From The Past, Cult Movies, Drugsploitation, Graffiti, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB, Sex, Trash TV

Spock Pwns A Punk – Star Trek Punksploitation

“When Kirk and Spock are traveling on a public bus, they encounter a punk rocker blaring his music on a boom box, to the discomfort of everyone around him. Spock takes matters into his own hands and performs a Vulcan nerve pinch. Part of the inspiration for the scene came from Nimoy’s personal experiences with a similar character on the streets of New York; “[I was struck] by the arrogance of it, the aggressiveness of it, and I thought if I was Spock I’d pinch his brains out!” On learning about the scene, Kirk Thatcher, an associate producer on the film, convinced Nimoy that he could play the role; he shaved his hair into a mohawk and bought clothes to complete the part. Credited as “punk on bus”, Thatcher wrote and recorded “I Hate You”, the song in the scene, and it was his idea to have the punk—rendered unconscious by the pinch—hit the stereo and turn it off with his face.” – Wikipedia

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Star Trek

File under Fashion, Music, Punksploitation, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB