MTA | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Hot In The Pants

  • In the video, the woman pushing the stroller gets into an argument as the train pulls into a station. During the confrontation, which quickly becomes physical, the baby’s stroller rolls onto the subway platform.

    As the fight continues, horrified straphangers attempt to break up the fight as well as bring the baby’s disappearance to the woman’s attention.

    After the fight is broken up, the woman with the child walks off the train and pushes the stroller, baby in tow, along the platform as the other woman continues to shout from the subway car.

  • Police are investigating after raunchy videos of teenagers partying on a school bus bound for a southern Ontario beach were posted to the Internet.The videos show dozens of teens — decked out in sunglasses, tank tops and shorts — dancing in the isles of a yellow school bus en route to Grand Bend, Ont., while music blares in the background.
    Some of the revellers can be seen holding beer bottles while other teens film the out-of-control scene with their cellphones.
    In one video, two young girls kiss as the other partiers cheer them on.
    One female lies on top of a male and gyrates her hips as teens shriek with joy.
    But the party was interrupted after police, tipped off by a Facebook page promoting the summer party, stopped the bus on route to the Lake Huron beach last Friday.
  • A 17-year-old boy ‘brutally and mercilessly’ killed his parents before having a house party while their bodies were still inside a bedroom, police said.

    Tyler Hadley, of Port St Lucie, Florida, allegedly beat his school teacher mother Mary-Jo and father Blake to death with a hammer, which was found lying between their bodies.

    The teen is thought to have killed his parents before hosting a party for 40 to 60 people on Saturday night after posting invitations on Facebook.

  • An arrest warrant has been issued for the manager of a Marietta McDonald’s after she punched a mother of two autistic boys in the face, Marietta police said.
  • The group’s actions have become intolerable, Steven Chabinsky, deputy assistant FBI director, said in an interview with NPR.

    “We want to send a message that chaos on the Internet is unacceptable,” Chabinsky said. “[Even if] hackers can be believed to have social causes, it’s entirely unacceptable to break into websites and commit unlawful acts.”

    The group followed up with a statement to the FBI and Chabinsky, with a list of things it deems unacceptable: “Governments lying to their citizens and inducing fear and terror to keep them in control … corporations aiding and conspiring with said governments … lobby conglomerates who only follow their agenda to push the profits higher.”

  • If you thought the outrage over the phone-hacking scandal was starting to die down, The Times of London, one of Rupert Murdoch’s own papers, may have brought it straight back into the spotlight.

    An editorial cartoon published Thursday morning in the paper with the title “Priorities” shows starving people in Somalia saying “We’ve had a bellyful of phone-hacking … ” It’s causing quite a firestorm on Twitter. You can access the newspaper’s site here, but you won’t be able to get past the pay wall without a subscription. The paper has not yet returned calls for comment.

  • The grave condition of a Queens teenager hit in a chain-reaction wreck was overshadowed by the presence of an NBA celebrity, witnesses said Tuesday.

    As 15-year-old Awsaf Islam lay dying on a Sunnyside street last Thursday, bystanders focused on Lakers star Lamar Odom, who emerged unscathed from one of the wrecked cars, they said.

    “Everybody was paying attention to him. Nobody cared about the kid,” said Adolfo Ramirez, 13, who witnessed the crash.

    “It was messed up,” witness Naldo Vasquez, 15, said. “They got excited and were asking to take photos with him.”

  • Ships of the future may be able to move through the water without a creating a wake. That is according to a pair of physicists in the US, who have proposed a new type of material that lets water flow around an object as if it were not there at all. The design, which has yet to be built, could boost the energy efficiency of ships and submarines – and even prevent them from being detected. “The main function of [our] structure is to prevent fluid flowing around an object from ‘feeling’ that object,” says Yaroslav Urzhumov of Duke University.
  • Artificial intelligence has been the inspiration for countless books and movies, as well as the aspiration of countless scientists and engineers. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have now taken a major step toward creating artificial intelligence — not in a robot or a silicon chip, but in a test tube. The researchers are the first to have made an artificial neural network out of DNA, creating a circuit of interacting molecules that can recall memories based on incomplete patterns, just as a brain can.
  • Workmen scoured “HAMAD” into the sand on the orders of Abu Dhabi’s Sheikh Hamad Bin Hamdan Al Nahyan.

    The name is two miles across — with letters a kilometre high. It is so huge that the “H”, the first “A” and part of the “M” have been made into waterways.

    The mega-rich sheikh, 63 — a member of the ruling family of Abu Dhabi — in the oil-rich United Arab Emirates — boasts a £14billion fortune that is second only to the Saudi king’s.

  • Seen any walnuts in your medicine cabinet lately? According to the Food and Drug Administration, that is precisely where you should find them. Because Diamond Foods made truthful claims about the health benefits of consuming walnuts that the FDA didn’t approve, it sent the company a letter declaring, “Your walnut products are drugs” — and “new drugs” at that — and, therefore, “they may not legally be marketed … in the United States without an approved new drug application.” The agency even threatened Diamond with “seizure” if it failed to comply.
  • The terrorists at the Department of Homeland Enslavement otherwise known by the average American zombie as the Department of Homeland Security are now saying that violent extremists have obtained insider positions in the utility sector and could be preparing to unleash a variety of terrorist attacks on key infrastructure. This is a complete and total fabrication from an organization that is merely trying to justify its own existence by spreading absurdly ridiculous propaganda. It is a fact that the Department of Homeland Security would never issue a report stating that the terror threat is low because questions would be raised as to why so much money is being used to finance their operations. As a result, they have to spread fear of terrorism no matter how ridiculous the premise in order to ensure that their organization does not receive cuts in funding.
  • What $114,500,000,000,000 visually looks like in 100 dollar bills
  • The U.S. Federal Reserve gave out $16.1 trillion in emergency loans to U.S. and foreign financial institutions between Dec. 1, 2007 and July 21, 2010, according to figures produced by the government’s first-ever audit of the central bank.

    Last year, the gross domestic product of the entire U.S. economy was $14.5 trillion.

  • Milagros Garcia is an alleged Alien and Human inter-species hybrid. The blood DNA from this Puerto Rican woman has yielded analyses so unusual and interesting that the physician involved is now interested in meeting the subject for further study. The DNA is possible in humans but is very rare.

    Ms. Garcia claims that she is the offspring of an alien encounter. The Doctor is not interested in the UFO/ alien phenomena he wants answers as to why her DNA has such rare qualities.

  • This latest ad-campaign is a brilliant attempt to strike fear into the hearts and minds of the American Public. One will see the genius behind the psychological operation in the videos bellow.

    These videos are meant to scare the public into turning on the neighbors and other fellow countrymen. They also show white Americans as the terrorists rather then the usual Muslim patsies.

    Do we really need to be told to call 911 when seeing something that warrants the attention of law enforcement?

    The country is in dire straights when it comes to our debt. Should we really be pouring money down the drain to fund over the top ad-campaigns?

  • House Republicans proposed draft legislation last week that would let companies like Fox, AT&T and Verizon buy their way out of public interest obligations. Here’s how:

    Broadcasters, like Fox, can buy their way out of public interest obligations if they put spectrum licenses up for sale.
    Wireless companies, like AT&T and Verizon, can buy their way out of consumer protections if they buy this new spectrum.
    “Unlicensed spectrum” is on the auction block, selling off public airwaves and making us pay for future WiFi-like services.
    To make it worse, all of this is wrapped up in the debt ceiling debate, but won’t actually make a significant dent in the national debt.

  • It seems that the UK isn’t the only country at the centre of a phone hacking scandal.

    A spokesman for the Taliban has claimed that phones, email accounts and a website belonging to the group were hacked, and text messages distributed claiming that their reclusive Afghan leader Mullah Mohammed Omar had died from heart disease.

    The original SMS text messages were received from phone numbers belonging to Taliban spokemen Zabihullah Mujahid and Qari Yousuf, and read:

    “Spiritual Leader Mullah Mohammad Omar Mujahid has died. May Allah bless his soul.”

    Zabihullah Mujahid angrily denied the rumours that Mullah Omar, one of the world’s most wanted men, was dead, in an interview with Reuters:

    “This is the work of American intelligence, and we will take revenge on the telephone network providers.”

  • As the report put it, “The typical Internet user is more than twice as likely as others to feel that people can be trusted,” with regular Facebook users the most trusting of all. “A Facebook user who uses the site multiple times per day is 43% more likely than other Internet users and more than three times as likely as non-Internet users to feel that most people can be trusted.” What’s more, while the average American has two “discussion confidants”–people they discuss important matters with–Facebookers who log in several times a day average 9% more close ties.
  • The answer might depend on which media outlet you rely on.

    I read the headline at Democracy Now! on Friday:

    “Justice Dept Drops 99 of 101 Cases Against CIA for Abuse and Torture”

    The New York Times, on the other hand, offered a different sort of emphasis:

    “U.S. Widens Inquiries Into 2 Jail Deaths”

  • But were the site’s users all criminals hell-bent on destroying the movie industry? According to a report from Telepolis, a recent study found the reverse was true.

    The study, which was carried out by Society for Consumer Research (GfK), found that users of pirate sites including Kino.to did not fit the copyright lobby-painted stereotype of parasites who take and never give back.

    In fact, the study also found that Internet users treat these services as a preview, a kind of “try before you buy.”

    This, the survey claims, leads pirate site users to buy more DVDs, visit the cinema more often and on average spend more than their ‘honest’ counterparts at the box office.

    “The users often buy a ticket to the expensive weekend-days,” the report notes.

    In the past similar studies have revealed that the same is true for music. People who pirate a lot of music buy significantly more music than those who don’t.

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File under Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 22, 2011

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Wet White Pussy Swallows It Whole

  • Substantial damage to the fuel cores at two additional reactors of Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex has taken place, operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Sunday, further complicating the already daunting task of bringing them to a safe shutdown while avoiding the release of high levels of radioactivity. The revelation followed an acknowledgment on Thursday that a similar meltdown of the core took place at unit No. 1.
  • The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary collections of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation and other contributing libraries and archives.
  • A Queens pol who has championed anti-graffiti laws wants to crack down on “fat caps,” a device he says vandals put on spray-paint cans to tag wider areas in less time.

    Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. said he will introduce legislation this month to ban sales of fat caps to anyone under 21 and require older patrons to show ID.

    He previously helped pass laws that restrict the sale of spray-paint cans and broad-tipped markers. He has also sponsored a bill restricting the sale of etching acid.

  • A British grandmother begged for help moments before being decapitated by a stranger who allegedly paraded her head through a popular Spanish resort town declaring “this is my treasure”.
  • A new craze sweeping the Internet known as “planking” claimed a life in Australia Sunday and police fear the tragedy may not be the last.

    Planking involves someone lying flat on their stomach with their arms against their bodies in unusual and sometimes dangerous situations, with photographs of their exploits shared through social media sites.

    It has gone viral in recent weeks with the Facebook page Planking Australia boasting over 55,000 fans and hundreds of photos of people lying on train tracks, escalators, fire hydrants, motorbikes and other objects.

  • Ana Catarian Bezerra is a 36-year-old Brazilian woman who suffers from a chemical imbalance that triggers severe anxiety and hypersexuality. Ana, an accountant by day, began to have problems at work because the only way to relieve said anxiety is by masturbating. A lot. Now, after winning a court battle and seeking professional medical help, Ana is allowed to masturbate and watch porn — using her work’s computer, no less — legally.
  • Maggie Rodriguez spoke to 8-year-old Mikey Hicks and his mother Nahjlah about sharing a name with a suspected terrorist on a government watch list and how he’s treated by airport security.
  • David Phillips, a civil engineer at UC-Davis, has become a cult hero in the obsessive subculture of people who collect frequent-flier miles by converting $3,150 worth of pudding into 1.2 million miles. Oh, yeah – he’s also going to claim an $815 tax write-off.

    Last May, Phillips was pushing his shopping cart down the frozen-food aisle of his local supermarket when a promotion on a Healthy Choice frozen entree caught his eye: He could earn 500 miles for every 10 Universal Product Codes (bar codes) from Healthy Choice products he sent to the company by Dec 31. Even better: Any Healthy Choice bar codes mailed by the end of the month would rack up double the mileage, or 1,000 miles for every 10 labels.

  • A short film about my favorite post-apocalyptic hell-hole, the Salton Sea.
  • The UK’s “outdated” drug laws could be doing more harm than good and are failing to recognise that banning some “legal highs” may have negative consequences for public health, according to the leading independent panel set up to analyse drugs policy.

    On the eve of the 40th anniversary of the Misuse of Drugs Act, the UK Drug Policy Commission warns that the exponential rise in “legal highs” and the availability of substances over the internet is making current laws redundant.

  • One of the most exciting pieces of news to emerge from Cannes this week was the announcement of Jodorowsky’s Dune, a documentary about the failed attempt by ambitious and very possibly insane Chilean filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky to film Frank Herbert‘s novel Dune in the mid-’70s. The project has long stood as one of the great ‘films that never were.’ Just the idea of seeing the surviving participants talk about what the film might have been is exciting, and that’s what the doc offers — hopefully we’ll also see art and designs that have not previously been released.

    So here’s the first promo video for the film, in which Alejandro Jodorowsky explains just how ambitious his plan for the movie really was.

  • There is no facile synthesis of the events that transpired at the Wamego missile silo between October 1 and November 4, 2000. The available information is a viscous solution of truths, half-lies, three-quarter truths, and outright lies, the fractionation of which yields no pure product. The dramatis personae are many and varied. The chemicals in question often obscure and untested. What is known is that in 1997, a virtuosic organic chemist named Leonard Pickard joined forces with Gordon Todd Skinner, the heir to a spring-manufacturing fortune, to organize what would later become the world’s most productive LSD laboratory. A laboratory that, according to some sources, produced 90 percent of the LSD in circulation, in addition to unknown quantities of MDMA, ALD-52, ergot wine, and quite possibly LSZ… but I’ll get to that later.
  • Robert Fitzpatrick is so convinced the end is near he’s betting his life savings on it.

    The retired MTA employee has pumped $140,000 into a NYC Transit ad campaign to warn everyone the world will end next Saturday.

    “Global Earthquake! The Greatest Ever – Judgment Day: May 21,” the ad declares above a placid picture of night over Jerusalem with a clock that’s about to strike midnight.

    “I’m trying to warn people about what’s coming,” the 60-year-old Staten Island resident said. “People who have an understanding [of end times] have an obligation to warn everyone.”

    His doomsday warning has appeared on 1,000 placards on subway cars, at a cost of $90,000, and at bus shelters around the city, for $50,000 more.
    Fitzpatrick’s millenial mania began after he retired in 2006 and began listening to California evangelist Harold Camping’s “end of days” predictions.

    Thanks Nico

  • The magazine instilled in me a habit of mind, a way of thinking about a world rife with false fronts, small print, deceptive ads, booby traps, treacherous language, double standards, half truths, subliminal pitches and product placements; it warned me that I was often merely the target of people who claimed to be my friend; it prompted me to mistrust authority, to read between the lines, to take nothing at face value, to see patterns in the often shoddy construction of movies and TV shows; and it got me to think critically in a way that few actual humans charged with my care ever bothered to.

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File under Culture, Graffiti, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Suicide Squad

  • If organized religion is the opium of the masses, then disorganized religion is the marijuana of the lunatic fringe.
  • 1917 J. A. F. Fisher Let. 9 Sept. in Memories (1919) v. 78, I hear that a new order of Knighthood is on the tapis—O.M.G. (Oh! My God!)—Shower it on the Admiralty!
  • On February 5th, 2003, then-Secretary of State Colin Powell went to the United Nations, to make the case for war in Iraq. A central plank of his presentation: the anthrax attacks that killed five people and helped send the country into a panic in the days after 9/11.

    “Less than a teaspoon-full of dry anthrax in an envelope shut down the United States Senate in the fall of 2001. This forced several hundred people to undergo emergency medical treatment and killed two postal workers just from an amount just about this quantity that was inside of an envelope,” Powell said. “Saddam Hussein could have produced 25,000 liters. If concentrated into this dry form, this amount would be enough to fill tens upon tens upon tens of thousands of teaspoons..”

    By the end of the following month, the invasion of Iraq was underway.

  • Manslaughter and perjury are among possible charges that Justice Department investigators are exploring in the early stages of their probe into the Gulf oil spill, people familiar with the inquiry said Tuesday.
  • One week after an international military coalition intervened in Libya, the cost to U.S. taxpayers has reached at least $600 million, according figures provided by the Pentagon.

    U.S. ships and submarines in the Mediterranean have unleashed at least 191 Tomahawk cruise missiles from their arsenals to the tune of $268.8 million, the Pentagon said.

    U.S. warplanes have dropped 455 precision guided bombs, costing tens of thousands of dollars each.

    A downed Air Force F-15E fighter jet will cost more than $60 million to replace.

    And operation of the war craft, guzzling ever-expensive fuel to maintain their positions off the Libyan coast and in the skies above, could reach millions of dollars a week, experts say.

  • Our Milky Way galaxy may be home to at least two billion Earthlike planets, a new study says.

    But don’t start making colonization plans just yet: The number is actually far lower than many scientists were expecting, which could make it hard to find other “Earths” in our galaxy, the study authors say.

  • Reptiles speakin’ in tongues…
  • Subcontractors to several companies connected to the plant have reportedly been offered 80,000 to 100,000 yen a day (£608 to £760) to join the operation, according to one former plant worker. The team of men inside the complex have been dubbed “samurai” and “suicide squads” in the popular press.
  • Hidehiko Nishiyama, deputy director-general of the agency, played down the potential effects of the radioactive seawater as residents in the area had been evacuated and there was no fishing activity in the region.

    “Iodine 131 has a half-life of eight days, and even considering its concentration in marine life, it will have deteriorated considerably by the time it reaches people,” Nishiyama told a news conference.

  • The reason radioactivity can be measured is that radioactive material is escaping. What is dangerous is when that material enters your body and irradiates it from inside. These industry-mouthpiece scholars come on TV and what to they say? They say as you move away the radiation is reduced in inverse ratio to the square of the distance. I want to say the reverse. Internal irradiation happens when radioactive material is ingested into the body. What happens? Say there is a nuclear particle one meter away from you. You breathe it in, it sticks inside your body; the distance between you and it is now at the micron level. One meter is 1000 millimeters, one micron is one thousandth of a millimeter. That’s a thousand times a thousand: a thousand squared. That’s the real meaning of “inverse ratio of the square of the distance.” Radiation exposure is increased by a factor of a trillion. Inhaling even the tiniest particle, that’s the danger.
  • In normal times, Masataka Shimizu lives in The Tower, a luxury high-rise in the same upscale Tokyo district as the U.S. Embassy. But he hasn’t been there for more than two weeks, according to a doorman.
    The Japanese public hasn’t seen much of him recently either. Shimizu, the president of Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco, the company that owns a haywire nuclear power plant 150 miles from the capital, is the most invisible — and most reviled — chief executive in Japan.
    Amid rumors that Shimizu had fled the country, checked into a hospital or committed suicide, company officials said Monday that their boss had suffered an unspecified “small illness” because of overwork after a 9.0-magnitude earthquake sent a tsunami crashing onto his company’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
  • I’ve been eating two family-size bags a day for two years, and little else for the past decade. My shopping trolley looks as if I’m having a children’s party. The idea of eating anything else is repellent; I don’t like being full and bloated, which is how “proper food” makes me feel. I have a tea for breakfast, skip lunch and then I’m ready for my first large bag of crisps at around 4pm and my second bag at 8pm. During the day I’ll have a few cups of tea and sometimes a cola. I don’t get ravenous because my body is used to it after all these years.
  • While testing out the paywall Monday afternoon, Mashable readers Dmitry Beniaminov and Yuri Victor pointed out that it’s breathtakingly easy to subvert the paywall. Readers need only remove “?gwh=numbers” from the URL. They can also clear their browser caches, or switch browsers as soon as they see the subscription prompt. All three of these simple fixes will let them continue reading.
  • Here’s what the Times Square station looked like 25 years ago. The footage was shot with a 16mm film camera in June of ’86, about three years before the MTA officially implemented its “clean train” policy and took subway cars festooned with graffiti out of service. Also of interest, signs for the “K” and “CC” trains.

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File under Graffiti, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Nukes ‘n Nazis

  • A devastating earthquake strikes Japan. A massive tsunami kills thousands. Fears of a nuclear meltdown run rampant. Bloodshed and violence escalate in Libya.
    And U.S. companies selling doomsday bunkers are seeing sales skyrocket anywhere from 20% to 1,000%.
    Northwest Shelter Systems, which offers shelters ranging in price from $200,000 to $20 million, has seen sales surge 70% since the uprisings in the Middle East, with the Japanese earthquake only spurring further interest. In hard numbers, that’s 12 shelters already booked when the company normally sells four shelters per year.“Sales have gone through the roof, to the point where we are having trouble keeping up,” said Northwest Shelter Systems owner Kevin Thompson.

  • Himmler, who ran the modern industrial-scale murder programme of the Jews, was also spellbound by myths and legends all his life. He financed expeditions to far-flung corners of the earth by Indiana Jones-type S.S. men seeking proof of the supremacy of Ayran man – ie, the Germans.

    The skull, which weighs nearly 20lbs, is of the same design as the death’s head which adorned the uniforms of his killers. It was found in a wooden and leather box in the home of an old lady and it is now in the hands of Swiss journalist Luc Burgin.

    With it, it is claimed, was a list of 35 treasures which the S.S. was seeking to bring back to Germany from Sudetenland on the border with Czechoslovakia as the Reich crumbled in 1945. Part of it reads;”Nr. 14; the crystal skull – 263-2 RFSS Collection Rahn, No 25592, leather case, crystal death‘s head, South America.”

  • In the wake of the continuing nuclear tragedy in Japan, the United States government is still moving quickly to increase the amounts of radiation the population can “safely” absorb by raising the safe zone for exposure to levels designed to protect the government and nuclear industry more than human life. It’s all about cutting costs now as the infinite-growth paradigm sputters and moves towards extinction. As has been demonstrated by government conduct in the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of Deepwater Horizon and in Japan, life has taken a back seat to cost-cutting and public relations posturing.

    The game plan now appears to be to protect government and the nuclear industry from “excessive costs”… at any cost.

  • The world’s fourth-largest economy stands alone among leading industrialized nations in its decision to stop using nuclear energy because of its inherent risks. It is betting billions on expanding the use of renewable energy to meet power demands instead.

    The transition was supposed to happen slowly over the next 25 years, but is now being accelerated in the wake of Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant disaster, which Chancellor Angela Merkel has called a “catastrophe of apocalyptic dimensions.”

  • Researchers at a Canadian university are using nanotechnology and a tiny remote-controlled magnetic sphere to deliver cancer-fighting drugs directly to where they need to go.

    A scientific team at the Polytechnique Montral, one of Canada’s leading engineering schools, reported this week that they were able guide microcarriers through a live animal’s blood stream and deposit anti-cancer medicine directly on a targeted area on the animal’s liver.

    The carriers, made out of magnetic nanoparticles and biodegradable polymer, can be basically driven through arteries using a remote controlled device.

  • It’s possible that the family tree of all life on Earth has its roots on Mars — and a new device could put that theory to the test in a few years, researchers say.

    Researchers are developing an instrument that would search through samples of Martian dirt, isolating any genetic material from microbes that might be present — bugs that are living or that died relatively recently, within the last million years or so. Scientists could then use standard biochemical techniques to analyze any resulting genetic sequences, comparing them to what we find on Earth.

    “It’s a long shot,” said MIT researcher Chris Carr, who’s working on the life-detecting device, in a statement. “But if we go to Mars and find life that’s related to us, we could have originated on Mars. Or if it started here, it could have been transferred to Mars.”

  • A drug-resistant bacterium that has surfaced in Southern California has mostly spread in nursing homes, not hospitals, but more needs to be done to track it, health officials said Thursday.

    More than 350 cases of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, or CRKP, have been reported at healthcare facilities in Los Angeles County, mostly among elderly patients at skilled-nursing and long-term care facilities, according to a study by Dr. Dawn Terashita, an epidemiologist with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

  • For years, so many twins have been born in the small southern Brazilian town of Cândido Godói that residents wonder whether something mysterious lurks in the water, or even if Josef Mengele, the Nazi physician known as the Angel of Death, conducted experiments on the women there.
  • How two American kids became big-time weapons traders — until the Pentagon turned on them
  • Authorities in Pennsylvania arrested a 27-year-old woman who they say hid more than 100 items — including 54 bags of heroin and loose change — in her vagina.
  • The owner of the Hitler’s Den pool hall in central India is refusing to change the name despite objections from the Israeli Embassy and a Jewish group.

    “There is no way we will change the name,” owner Baljeet Ghosal told the Times of India. “We have been operating under this name since 2006 and now opened another one in Laxmi Nagar under the same banner. It is our identity.”

    Ghosal told the newspaper that he was looking for a “different-sounding name.” He also told the newspaper that people in Nagpur are not aware of Hitler’s atrocities against the Jews.

    “No one has raised any objection yet,” he told the Times of India.

  • An American who drugged her investment banker-husband with a milkshake and bludgeoned him to death more than seven years ago was convicted of murder Friday at her second trial in a case that grabbed world attention with lurid details on the breakdown of a wealthy expatriate marriage in Hong Kong.

    The unanimous verdict and automatic life sentence match the outcome of the first trial against Nancy Kissel, whose lawyers argued she was a battered, clinically depressed wife who acted under diminished responsibility when her husband provoked her attack.

  • A man with ties to the white supremacist movement was arrested and charged Wednesday in the foiled bombing of a Martin Luther King Day parade in this city last January.
  • Members filled their Gwalia Housing Association homes with ancient Egyptian idolatry, held ceremonies in robes and hoods and forced a number of children and vulnerable adults into depraved sex acts.
  • “A Long Island cop was shot in the face and killed by an MTA officer after a knife-wielding, self-proclaimed Satanist lunged at police and was gunned down in his home Saturday, sources said.”

    Brian Mullins, a 12-year-old eyewitness, recounted to police that DiGeronimo stared at him, “murderous-looking eyes” that were “staring into his soul” as he freakishly paraded down the streets of his neighborhood, knife in hand.

    Police, including an MTA office that lived nearby, corned DiGeronimo in a rear bedroom of his home after neighbors called police. Instead of dropping his weapon, Anthony lunged at police, resulting in officers executing the disturbed Satanist in the bedroom.

    That’s when the real tragedy began.

    “After the shooting, a Nassau County special operations cop stepped into the home. An MTA officer, standing near the door, saw the gun and shot the cop in the face.”

  • Medical records of Dr. Bruce Ivins, blamed by the FBI for the deadly 2001 anthrax mail attacks, “support the Justice Department’s determination that he was responsible,” a panel of behavioral experts and psychiatrists contended in a newly released report.

    “Dr. Ivins was psychologically disposed to undertake the mailings, his behavioral history demonstrated his potential for carrying them out, and he had the motivation and the means,” they said in a report made public Wednesday.

    Letters containing powdered anthrax were sent to news organizations and two US senators in late 2001, infecting 22 people who received or handled them, five of whom died. Ivins, a civilian researcher at the US Army’s Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Maryland, committed suicide in July 2008 as the FBI was preparing to accuse him of preparing and mailing the letters. He was never charged.

  • As a Portland-based rock band with a growing fan base and national ambitions, the Slants figured it wouldn’t hurt to take care of some business interests. On the advice of their attorney, they decided to register their name through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Protect the brand. It seemed simple enough.

    “It didn’t occur to us at the time that there would be an issue with the name,” says Simon Tam, the band’s manager and bass player, who performs under the name Simon Young. As a band of Asian Americans who play to a fan base with a high percentage of Asian Americans why would they anticipate a problem?

    One year, two rejections and a case file closing in on 200 pages later, it’s clear there is an issue with the name. That issue is Section 2(a) of the 1946 Trademark Act. It says, in part, that a trademark can be rejected if it “consists of or comprises immoral, deceptive, or scandalous matter; or matter which may disparage …”

  • Malte Spitz, recently learned, we are already continually being tracked whether we volunteer to be or not. Cellphone companies do not typically divulge how much information they collect, so Mr. Spitz went to court to find out exactly what his cellphone company, Deutsche Telekom, knew about his whereabouts.

    The results were astounding. In a six-month period — from Aug 31, 2009, to Feb. 28, 2010, Deutsche Telekom had recorded and saved his longitude and latitude coordinates more than 35,000 times. It traced him from a train on the way to Erlangen at the start through to that last night, when he was home in Berlin.

    Mr. Spitz has provided a rare glimpse — an unprecedented one, privacy experts say — of what is being collected as we walk around with our phones. Unlike many online services and Web sites that must send “cookies” to a user’s computer to try to link its traffic to a specific person, cellphone companies simply have to sit back and hit “record.”

  • One sign of possible deterioration in the plant itself came at Reactor No. 3. Workers who were trying to connect an electrical cable to a pump in a turbine building next to the reactor were injured when they stepped into water that was found to be significantly more radioactive than normal. On Friday, officials and experts offered conflicting explanations of what had gone wrong — but all pointed to greater damage to the reactor’s systems and more contamination there than officials had indicated earlier.

    Two workers were exposed to radiation and burned when water poured over their boots and down around their feet and ankles, officials said. A third worker was wearing higher boots and did not suffer the same exposure.

    Like the injured workers, many of those risking their lives are subcontractors of Tokyo Electric Power, who are paid a small daily wage for hours of work in dangerous conditions. In some cases they are poorly equipped and trained for their task.

  • Fukushima is like a cancer eating away at the habitat of the east coast of Japan. Whilst the situation appears to be stable, a number of slow burning processes must inevitably be eating away at the heart of these reactors. The solution to a number of these problems is to restore fresh water circulation to each of the cores and the spent fuel ponds. Whether or not the pumping systems work remains to be seen. Disposing of the salty radioactive sludge from inside the reactor vessels presents another major challenge.

    It seems possible that the current meta stable condition may persist for many more weeks, and all the while the release and accumulation of radioactive isotopes in the environment will continue. And there is still risk of a catastrophic failure due to heat or corrosion that would result in the status degrading rapidly. It is too early to call this crisis over.

  • A high-level radiation leak detected Thursday at one of six troubled reactors at the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant indicates possible damage to the reactor’s vessel, pipes or valves, the government’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said Friday.

    Three workers at the No. 3 reactor’s turbine building, connected to the reactor building, were exposed Thursday to water containing radioactive materials 10,000 times the normal level, with two of them taken to hospital due to possible radiation burns to their feet, the plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said.

    Hidehiko Nishiyama, spokesman for the governmental nuclear regulatory body, told a press conference, ”At present, our monitoring data suggest the (No. 3) reactor retains certain containment functions, but there is a good chance that the reactor has been damaged.”

  • “We think rolling out these kind of invasive measures is really another step toward mass surveillance of the population,” Calabrese told Raw Story. “I mean, now if you’re just walking around on the street, do you think that automatically police should be able to check your fingerprint? Seems very invasive to us.”

    But it’s more than just invasive, he suggested: it’s a fundamental revolution in American values.

    “Facial recognition is one of the most invasive biometrics because it allows surreptitious tracking at a distance,” Calabrese continued. “They can secretly track you from camera to camera, location to location. That has enormous implications, not just for security but also for American society. I mean, we are now at a point where we can automatically track people. Computers could do that. That’s what, we think, is a grave danger to our privacy.”

  • As workers race to stave off further melting at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors in Japan, several robots there are waiting on the sidelines for an opportunity to help. Questions remain, however, regarding how these units might assist in an ongoing emergency at a site contaminated with radiation and deluged with tons of corrosive seawater.
  • Although charged with the possession of six plus ounces of weed, Nelson will please guilty to possessing just over three thanks to Hudspeth County Attorney C.R. “Kit” Bramblett, who openly calls Nelson his “favorite artist.”

    Speaking to reporter Sterry Butcher at The Big Bend Sentinel newspaper, Bramblett, now 78, confessed that he’d admired Nelson all his life. He even joked that they’d maybe helped Willie out a bit.

    “Between me and the sheriff, we threw out enough of it or smoked enough so that there’s only three ounces, which is within my jurisdiction,” he quipped, before explaining that the extra weight was actually due to excessive packaging.

    If that’s indeed the case, Willie isn’t actually getting special treatment. In fact, most misdemeanor possession cases that draw a guilty plea are handled by mail.

    With the official charge now reduced to a misdemeanor, he’ll be ordered to pay a $100 fine and $278 in court fees.

  • A blurred portrait is visible in the controversial photos of Adolf Hitler’s “doppelganger suicide.” In the picture above on the left, the out of focus portrait was placed directly onto the corpse. In the Russian movie footage frame on the right, the blurred portrait appears as a prop in the background. This change of position invites serious speculation that the body may also have been moved, switched, or meddled with between photos.
  • During World War II the leaders of the Axis powers (Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and Emperor Hirohito) were sometimes depicted by Allied “black” propagandists as monsters. Black propaganda purports to emanate from a source other than the true one. This type of propaganda is associated with covert psychological operations. The enemy leaders were caricatured as gorillas, skeletons, rats, or whatever the Allied “psywarriors” could dream up. This was all part of the process of wartime depersonalization, the destruction of an individual as a human being and the resultant new image of him as vermin good only for killing.
  • RABIDLY ANTI-NAZI
    PRE-WAR AMERICAN
    PHOTO BOOK 1939
    “HITLER DOOMED TO DIE” Nazi dagger, Nazi baby
    Nazi atrocities
    This is a very historic piece of American pre-war literature called HITLER DOOMED TO DIE and was published in 1939 without the name of either the author or the publisher! The perfect bound 8-1/2 x 11-1/8 inch, very heavily illustrated, 98 page softbound book claims to tell the story of the life and crimes of Adolf Hitler, Hermann Göring, Dr. Joseph Goebbels, Heinrich Himmler and other top Nazis in text and photos.

    In chapters such as “Sexual Pervert”, “Hitler – Illegitimate? A Jew?”, “A German-Jew’s Story”, “Vienna’s Flophouse Fuehrer”, “Concentration Camp Horrors”, etc., the book explains that Hitler as a toddler was found “…pulling the wings off flies or spread-eagling the frogs that he caught in the garden…” and when he was four years old he was found “…chewing a field mouse he caught and dismembered.” It gets worse.

  • As we’ve been watching the conflict in Libya play out exactly like the war in Iraq, and being keen to their tricks and tactics, we began examining pictures, videos and other evidence to lead us to the conclusion that this entire ordeal is a CIA-backed coup. We believe there is actually very little conflict (if any) aside from the false flags perpetuated by the CIA/MI6/MOSSAD in a UN takeover of the region. Considering the internet blackout disabling the people’s ability to speak, Russia Today’s interviews with the people of Libya, and the great oracle John McCain’s prophecy that Gaddofi will bomb his own oil reserves, a clearer picture began to form.
  • Video shows the store in disarray, a mannequin wearing a “Not Violence” t-shirt was knocked to the ground and lost it’s head, a gift card display was knocked over and pieces of a woman’s hair weave were strewn on the floor.
  • Better than Electric Car – 258 miles/gallon: IPO 2010 in Shanghai

    This is a single seated car

    From conception to production: 3 years and the company is headquartered in Hamburg , Germany

    Will be selling for 4000 yuan, equivalent to US$600

    Gas tank capacity = 1.7 gallons

    Speed = 62 – 74.6 Miles/hour

    Fuel efficiency = 258 miles/gallon

    Travel distance with a full tank = 404 miles

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Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on March 26, 2011

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Amerikkkan Koncentration Kamp

  • The American Civil Liberties Union won a free speech victory preventing troopers from ticketing people for using profanity.

    State police said they will not be citing people for disorderly conduct based solely on profanity.

  • A Mexican official said that Border Patrol agents fired warning shots after Torres and other Mexican kids tried to cross into the U.S., and that Torres died after falling from a border wall and hitting his head, the AP reported on Wednesday. The official said that no one was hit by the shots. But Nogales International reports that an autopsy conducted by the Sonoran police showed Torres was killed by a bullet that entered his body from the back of his right arm and entered his chest cavity before puncturing his lungs and getting lodged in his ribcage.
  • MacQuat said police confused the smell of marijuana with the scent of a skunk that lives beneath the front of his home.
  • The region is already grappling with one of the highest crime rates in the world; now it’s got a new intruder to contend with.
  • Investigators learned that Matthews had actually stolen the identity from a felon in Nevada a decade earlier, prosecutors said.

    Authorities believe that Matthews used the felon’s identity to purchase the BMW.

    Prosecutors say he contacted police with the phony stolen identity report after defaulting on the payments, and didn’t want his own stolen identity negatively affected.

  • The warrior is a street artist working in Albuquerque, using spilled paint to pour rainbows off the tops of buildings. He (or she)’s really got some people riled up (see newscast, here) and it strikes me as remarkable that people can be so dour in the face of rainbows.
  • A man in possession of the world’s greatest license plate has lost his battle with the Virginia DMV, who ridiculously claim it encourages oral sex with kids instead of just cannibalism. Here’s their predictably unfunny response to the funny plate.
  • Barack Obama bid a grateful farewell to Robert Gibbs Wednesday by stressing to The New York Times that his press secretary “had a six-year stretch now where basically he’s been going 24/7 with relatively modest pay.” As a senior White House aide, Gibbs modestly earned $172,200 last year. That income alone — leaving out any earnings by his wife — would put Gibbs in the upper 8 percent of all American families, according to 2009 Census figures.
  • Allen Robert Reyes, 31, has been arrested for allegedly shooting a woman in the face at a party. A tipster tells us that Allen Robert Reyes is the real name of pickup guru “Gunwitch.”

    Reyes was featured in Neil Straus’ The Game; according to the book:

    …Gunwitch and Gunwitch Method, in which the only thing students have to do is project animalistic sexuality and escalate physical contact until the woman stops them. His crude motto: “Make the ho say no.”

  • Some 400 high-tech South African traffic lights are out of action after thieves in Johannesburg stole the mobile phone Sim cards they contain.

    The thieves ran up bills amounting to thousands of dollars by using the stolen cards to make calls.

    Johannesburg Road Agency (JRA) said it is investigating the possibility of an “inside job” after only the Sim card-fitted traffic lights were targeted.

    The cards were fitted to notify JRA when the traffic lights were faulty.

  • FOR this man, the phrase ‘there’s a bit of the devil in him’ has real meaning after he started growing horns from his head.

    Huang Yuanfan, 84 from southern China has baffled medics after he began to grow a horn on his head.

    Mr Yuanfan explained that the bizarre growth began as a small bump two years ago but just continued to grow.

    “I tried picking at it and even filing it but nothing changed it. The horn just kept getting bigger,” he said.

  • Working with a jeweller and the vinyl record manufacturer Dubstudios, I created this engagement ring for my partner Shelina. The ring has a 20 second recorded message (my proposal) etched onto it’s surface and can be played back with a miniature record player.

    “Shelina, I’ll love you forever. Marry Me!…Shelina, I’ll love you forever. Marry Me!….”

    100 lbf/in² of pressure was required to cut the silver ring, using a vibrating diamond stylus. The ring is also a homage to Thomas Edison who made the first sound recording machine – the phonograph in 1877.

  • Ani – some call it the City of 1001 Churches, others the City of Forty Gates. Yet no one has called it home for more than three centuries.

    Abandoned by its once prosperous and powerful inhabitants, it is situated on the Turkish side of a militarised zone between the border of Turkey and Armenia.

    The city of Ani is no stranger to death, destruction and desertion.

  • Indeed, the best model seems to be the Frankenstein monster who advances impervious to pain, bullets, and this time to fire, in order to murder, dismember or bugger men, women, children and the household pets.

    The myths are compelling because they touch an emotional core that has meaning in the individual and in the culture, and they exploit our fascination with horror.

    The user commits wanton rape and murder, the murders often encompass fratricide, matricide or infanticide. The monster must die bizarrely: drowning in inches of water, attempting to fly from a building or trying to halt a speeding two-ton vehicle with its bare hands or body.

    If it lives it should commit the most sexually meaningful self-mutilations, removal of the eyes or castration.

    These tales are the archetypal expressions of human inner terrors and exist in the preserved ballad and epic tales of most languages.

    Jung would have loved to analyze the facts about PCP presented by American media.

  • An online archive of a scandalous and short-lived 70’s teen magazine! The first issue of Star hit the stands in February 1973. With its over-the-top advice and irreverent coverage of LA’s teenage groupie scene, it wasn’t long before Petersen Publishing was feeling the heat from “concerned citizens”. Five issues and five months later, publication ceased. A sixth issue was planned but never printed. Such controversy along with coverage of “new breed” Sunset Strip groupies (Shray Mecham, Sable Starr, Lori Lightning, Queenie Glam) and glam venues like Rodney Bingenheimer’s English Disco cemented the mag’s later cult status among fans and collectors.
  • Chloe Sevigny traveled from Miami to…the Jersey Shore? The Big Love star was spotted court side at the Knicks game with none other than Pauly D from MTV’s Jersey Shore. The two joked together and cheered on the New York Knicks to a blow out victory over the San Antonio Spurs.
  • Why is Manning kept in solitary confinement? And what role did Assange play in Manning’s leaks? We answer these questions and more.
  • “Suge Knight ordered the hit,” Poole said, adding that he believes it was arranged by Reggie Wright Jr., who headed security for Death Row Records.

    Reggie Wright Jr. told CNN he had nothing to do with the murder, and Knight has repeatedly said he had nothing to do with the crime. Poole said he retired early from the LAPD, in part, because he was thwarted in following leads in the Wallace case involving police officers, some of whom worked off-duty for Death Row Records.

    “I think I was getting too close to the truth,” Poole said. “I think they feared that the truth would be a scandal.”

    One of the officers Poole said was involved is David Mack, who was sent to prison for robbing a bank in 1997, the same year Wallace was killed.

    Poole said Mack owned the same type of car driven by the gunman who shot Wallace, and Poole said a friend of Mack’s resembles a police sketch of the shooter.

  • The last time I saw this much natural beauty, I was about two-thirds into a bottle of Boone’s and I was squinting out of my lazy eye at the pile of puke that had just erupted from my esophageal tract. It had fallen into the pattern of a naked lady riding a hippo. It was truly stunning. Rorschach would’ve been proud.
  • Read it, but try not to weep, ladies—your tears may lower your man’s sex drive, according to a new study.
  • Kessel, Jan-07 11:20 am (PST):
    Dear Twitter User:

    We are writing to inform you that Twitter has received legal process requesting information regarding your Twitter account, @rop_g. A copy of the legal process is attached. The legal process requires Twitter to produce documents related to your account.

    Please be advised that Twitter will respond to this request in 10 days from the date of this notice unless we receive notice from you that a motion to quash the legal process has been filed or that this matter has been otherwise resolved.

    To respond to this notice, please e-mail us at <removed>.

    This notice is not legal advice. You may wish to consult legal counsel about this matter. If you need assistance seeking counsel, you may consider contacting the Electronic Frontier Foundation <contact info removed> or the ACLU <contact info removed>.

    Sincerely,

    Twitter Legal

  • Gee, why haven’t the American people given that power to its Federal Government? Oh yeah. It’s because we’re not Communists here. Oh, wait…apparently, even though we’re not Communists, we are represented by them. The FCC is set to vote this month on passing Net Neutrality regulations for the internet, giving our government more control over the internet than it’s ever had. They tried to pass this bill through Congress, but even the radicals in Congress couldn’t get enough votes for it. So Obama, true to his “ends justify the means” approach to Socializing our nation, simply moved the issue into the realm of the unelected, unaccountable FCC regulatory committee, where they will be free to impose these new internet “Laws” on us as they call them mere “Regulations”. You see, to the American Idol-watching public, “Regulations” are nothing to fear. And heck, why not get the government more involved in the internet, right? What could possibly go wrong?
  • After 40 years, the United States’ war on drugs has cost $1 trillion and hundreds of thousands of lives, and for what? Drug use is rampant and violence even more brutal and widespread.

    Even U.S. drug czar Gil Kerlikowske concedes the strategy hasn’t worked.

    “In the grand scheme, it has not been successful,” Kerlikowske told The Associated Press. “Forty years later, the concern about drugs and drug problems is, if anything, magnified, intensified.”

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