science fiction films | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Matango (1964) Attack Of The Mushroom People

Matango (マタンゴ?), also known as Matango, Fungus of Terror and Attack of the Mushroom People, is a 1963 Japanese tokusatsu movie. It was directed by Ishirō Honda, written by Takeshi Kimura based on the story “The Voice in the Night” by William Hope Hodgson (an adaptation credit is given to Masami Fukushima and Shinichi Hoshi, but Kimura threw out most of their contributions), and had special effects by Eiji Tsuburaya.

The movie has developed something of a cult audience over the years; partly due to its bleakness and unusual themes, particularly when compared to other Japanese fantasy and science fiction films of the same period (with the exception of Honda’s 1960 film The Human Vapor).


 

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René Laloux and Roland Topor – Animation Fantastique

René Laloux (July 13, 1929–March 14, 2004) was a French animator and film director.
He was born in Paris in 1929 and went to art school to study painting. After some time working in advertising, he got a job in a psychiatric institution where he began experimenting in animation with the interns. It is at the psychiatric institution that he made 1960’s Monkey’s Teeth (Les Dents du Singe), in collaboration with Paul Grimault’s studio, and using a script written by the Cour Cheverny’s interns.

Another important collaborator of his was Roland Topor with whom Laloux made Dead Time (Les Temps Morts, 1964), The Snails (Les Escargots, 1965) and his most famous work, the feature length Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage, 1973).

Laloux also worked with Jean Giraud (Mœbius) to create the lesser known film Les Maîtres du temps (Time Masters) in 1981. Laloux’s 1988 film, Gandahar, was released in the US as Light Years. The US version was redubbed by Harvey Weinstein, from a screenplay adapted by Isaac Asimov. The US version was not as successful as the French version, grossing less than $400,000 on its release.

Laloux died of a heart attack on March 14, 2004 in Angoulême, Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France.

-Wikipedia

Roland Topor (January 7, 1938 – April 16, 1997), was a French illustrator, painter, writer and filmmaker, known for the surreal nature of his work. He was of Polish Jewish origin and spent the early years of his life in Savoy where his family hid him from the Nazi peril.

-Wikipedia

Les Temps morts aka Dead Times (1964)

httpvp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=FAD73867DAA1FCEF

Les Escargots (1965)

La planète sauvage aka Fantastic Planet (1973)

httpvp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=7AB3DD5157444692



File under Animation, Arts 'n Crafts, Blast From The Past, Cult Movies, Culture, Influences, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB

1990: The Bronx Warriors Spaghetti Post Apocalyptic NYC

1990: I guerrieri del Bronx

“A Heavy Metal Journey Into An Urban Hell Where Everything Was Done Wrong!”


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“One of many post-apocalyptic science-fiction films which poured out of Europe in the wake of George Miller’s Mad Max, this film stars Stefania Girolami as Anna, who runs away from her wealthy but obnoxious family into the surrealistic biker gangland of the Bronx. There, she meets Trash (Marco de Gregorio), part of a gang called The Riders, and soon falls in love with him. Problems arise when Anna’s father (Enio Girolami), president of the evil Manhattan Corporation, sends in a psychopath named Hammer (Vic Morrow) to stir up trouble among the rival gangs, including a black club led by Ogre (Fred Williamson) and a rollerskating group led by Golem (Luigi Montefiori). Castellari’s direction is surprisingly stylish and exciting, but all of the hyper-macho posturing eventually grows tiresome for anyone over fifteen. Still, undemanding viewers will have a good time, as the action keeps coming fast and furious, laced with suitably hardbitten dialogue by director Enzo G. Castellari, Elisa Livia Briganti and Dardano Sacchetti. A minor classic of testosterone cinema, followed by several sequels starting with Fuga dal Bronx (1983).” – All Movie Guide

“Filmed in 1981 in both Rome and New York, 1990: The Bronx Warriors had a complete unknown as the male lead, 17 year old Marco de Gregorio (billed as Mark Gregory in all but the Italian release) who was spotted by director Enzo G. Castellari at a gym they both frequented. Castellari states on the director’s commentary of the DVD that Marco was very quiet, hardly speaking but doing a workout on his own and keeping to himself but standing out due to his looks, physique and height.

One scene has the twin towers of the World Trade Center visible in the background, during a meeting of main gang The Riders and the dominant Bronx gang The Tigers led by Ogre (Fred Williamson). The drummer that is inexplicably included in this scene was not scripted but was in the area of shooting the day that the scene was to be shot. Castellari included him in the scene, without any explanation being given as to why he was there, heralding the gangs’ arrival and starting up again as they leave.

This was Vic Morrow’s penultimate movie as he died while filming Twilight Zone: The Movie the following year.” – Wiki



File under Cult Movies, SeMeN SPeRmS Approved, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS ViDeO CLuB