Siemens | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Watched The Evil Face Become A Mass Of Bloody Pulp

  • Rushkoff is disappointed about how technology is being used today. He describes feeling of computer networks in 1991 as being like taking acid – there was a sense that anything was possible. In Cyberia he wrote that the only people that would be able to handle the new information reality would be psychedelic people and kids. He expanded upon the notion that kids would just inherently get cyberspace in Playing the Future.

    It hasn’t worked out that way. Rushkoff admits he was wrong about kids just getting cyberculture. He says recent studies have found that younger Internet users are more likely to fall for hoaxes or believe incorrect things they read on the Internet. Young people are less critical, not more.

  • A yearlong experiment with the nation’s electric grid could mess up traffic lights, security systems and some computers — and make plug-in clocks and appliances like programmable coffeemakers run up to 20 minutes fast.

    “A lot of people are going to have things break and they’re not going to know why,” said Demetrios Matsakis, head of the time service department at the U.S. Naval Observatory, one of two official timekeeping agencies in the federal government.

  • An enigmatic message on a Roman gladiator’s 1,800-year-old tombstone has finally been decoded, telling a treacherous tale.

    The epitaph and art on the tombstone suggest the gladiator, named Diodorus, lost the battle (and his life) due to a referee’s error, according to Michael Carter, a professor at Brock University in St. Catharines, Canada. Carter studies gladiator contests and other spectacles in the eastern part of the Roman Empire.

  • Aimi Eguchi, the latest star of the popular girl band AKB 48, told fans on her website that she was a normal 16-year-old from Saitama Prefecture, north of Tokyo who enjoyed track and field sports. Her cute features made her a fan favorite and quickly created a buzz. She soon took center stage in this candy commercial.

    Miss Eguchi blogged that her goal is “to become a new idol like never before by taking the best parts of my AKB big sisters”. This was true, but in a creepy-Frankenstein kind of way.

    Turns out that Aimi Eguchi is in fact a composite CGI creation using the body parts of the other 7 band members.

  • woman in the viewing gallery, 32 year old Nikia Bowman, apparently objected to the judge’s decision and made a comment, which the judge overheard. He called for a deputy to bring Bowman before the bench.

    Then Judge Bouchard admonished her, saying, “When I set a bond, I don’t need any lip from anybody.” Bowman told the judge, “I didn’t think you could hear me back there.”

    The judge sentenced her to one day in jail and told her to apologize. She said, “I apologize but I… ” “But what?”, said Judge Bouchard, angrily. “You be quiet! Do you understand? This is court. We are not on the street.”

    The judge then dismissed the woman from court into jail custody. But on the way out, Bowman muttered an obscenity, and at that time, Judge Bouchard tacked an additional 30 days onto her sentence, adding, “Do you want 60?”

  • Charlotte Young educates the public on how to interpret an artist’s statement
  • A paedophile who kept pictures of dead babies on his computer was jailed for 18 months yesterday.

    David Adams, 65, had the images from post-mortems in a file marked ‘Dead Kids’ within his huge cache of pornography.

  • Prompted by White House Documents signed by Eric P. Holdren, recent NASA press releases, and other events transpiring, The Intel Hub is releasing an advisory for a possible asteroid impact on or around Monday June 27, 2011. The NEO (Near Earth Object) in question is dubbed (2011 MD).

    Note: This is far from a for sure impact. All information released by the government and corporate media indicates that it will be a close pass but 100% miss earth.

    With that being said one must question: Why all the military movement?

  • The dark horse of the New World Order is not Communism, Socialism or Fascism: It is Technocracy.

    The development and implementation of Smart Grid technology in the U.S. – reinventing the electrical grid with Wifi-enabled digital power meters – is proceeding at breakneck speed. Although Smart Grid is the result of years of government planning, the recent kickoff was made possible through massive “green” grants that were quietly included in President Obama’s economic stimulus package starting in 2009.

    These lucrative grants have drawn in a host of corporate players, from utility companies to digital meter manufacturers to control software vendors. Global companies like IBM, GE and Siemens are putting their full effort behind the “build-out” that will consolidate all of America into a single, integrated, community

  • Two miles from the cow pasture where the Wright Brothers learned to fly the first airplanes, military researchers are at work on another revolution in the air: shrinking unmanned drones, the kind that fire missiles into Pakistan and spy on insurgents in Afghanistan, to the size of insects and birds.
  • Groupon is based on hype, rather than logic. Groupon’s salesmen use emotional bullying, to trick small business owners into signing lousy deals. Groupon’s insiders are cashing out their shares at ever-increasing valuations. They are exploiting the Ponzi opportunity created by Groupon’s hype.

    Groupon is one big scam. They need a steady stream of gullible small business owners, or businesses peddling overpriced junk. They rely on Ponzi hype to keep raising capital at ever-increasing prices. A logical analysis of Groupon shows it’s a scam. However, by using psychopath skills and appealing to emotions, Groupon tricks investors and small business owners.

  • Yesterday, the Justice Policy Institute (JPI) released a report chronicling the political strategies of private prison companies “working to make money through harsh policies and longer sentences.” The report’s authors note that while the total number of people in prison increased less than 16 percent, the number of people held in private federal and state facilities increased by 120 and 33 percent, correspondingly. Government spending on corrections has soared since 1997 by 72 percent, up to $74 billion in 2007. And the private prison industry has raked in tremendous profits. Last year the two largest private prison companies — Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and GEO Group — made over $2.9 billion in revenue.
  • U2 and its frontman Bono are known for their global poverty-fighting efforts but activists plan to protest their performance Friday at England’s Glastonbury festival, accusing the Irish band of dodging taxes.

    The anti-capitalist group Art Uncut said it would unfurl banners and placards in front of TV cameras filming the U2 gig on the festival’s main Pyramid Stage.

    Member Charlie Dewar said Bono campaigns against poverty in the developing world but has avoided paying Irish taxes at a time when his austerity-hit country desperately needs money.

  • As most of you are probably aware of by now, there was yet another major earthquake (7.2) experienced in the Alaska region today (24 June, 2011).
    Now like many of you, I personally feel that we have been experiencing an increasing trend in the number of such high magnitude earthquakes occurring around the world in just the last few years … Indonesia, Chile, New Zealand, Japan, etc. Sure, one can always try to explain this as simply a correlation with the increasing ease with which information (and news especially) becomes almost instantly accessible to us. So, out of curiousity, I decided to get the very useful Wolfram Alpha online data query program to run a search and report back on the number of earthquakes higher than magnitude 6 that have occurred in the time period beginning 1900 to the present date and present it as a graph … imagine my surprise when I took a look at the resulting graph.
  • Ninety percent of organizations have sustained at least one data breach in the past year, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Ponemon Institute and Juniper Networks.

    Even worse, the survey of 583 U.S. IT and IT security practitioners found that a majority of organizations have experienced multiple successful attacks against their networks.

    Fifty-nine percent of respondents said their networks have been compromised at least two times in the past year. Just 10 percent said they have had no breaches.

    Seventy-eight percent of those surveyed said there has been an increase in the frequency of attacks in the past year. Moreover, most respondents said attacks have become more severe and difficult to detect and contain.

    “We are seeing an uptick in hacking for profit and hacking for activism,”

  • This “Warning: Terrence Malick Film!” sign, published by Next Projection (and, update! Apparently actually photographed by reporter Joe Meyers, which, should it really be that hard to find and give credit on the Internet people? Sheesh!) was posted for movie-goers at the Avon, in Stamford, CT. What’s to even say? Do people really ask for their movie-ticket money back because… they were bored? Another reason to despise Connecticut.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under Culture, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Yes…Me Worry!

  • The 27-year-old Swede and his accomplice survived a weekend on water and cornflakes after managing to sneak into the bank’s vault in May of last year, the Aftonbladet newspaper reports.

    Outside the bank, two other men stood watch armed with mobile phones which they used to warn the Swede and his partner about the bank guards’ rounds.

    While in the vault, the robbers emptied 140 safety deposit boxes of cash and jewelry.

    During their extended stay in the bank’s basement, the pair made use of plastic bags to heed nature’s call.

    When the Swede and his fellow thief attempted to leave the bank on Monday morning, they were discovered by a security guard, who gave chase.

    In an attempt to distract the guard, the 27-year-old Swede threw the urine-filled bag at him.

  • Monique Smith, 19, came to her Bushwick apartment in June to find her pet hamster, Princess Stephania, dead. She immediately blamed her older brother, Aaron, accusing him of killing the cuddly creature by kicking an exercise ball in which the pet was playing.

    Authorities said the angry sister retaliated by slamming her 25-year-old brother’s hamster, Sweetie, to the ground.

    Then she “attempted to pull the hamster’s whiskers out and then crushed the hamster with her hand” in front of three of her younger siblings, according to court papers.

    Finally, she tossed the bloodied 4-ounce pet into the street outside the family home, authorities said. That prompted one of her horrified younger siblings to contact the ASPCA’s Humane Law Enforcement Unit.

  • They say money talks, and a new report suggests Canadian currency is indeed chatting, at least electronically, on behalf of shadowy spies.

    Canadian coins containing tiny transmitters have mysteriously turned up in the pockets of at least three American contractors who visited Canada, says a branch of the U.S. Department of Defence.
    Security experts believe the miniature devices could be used to track the movements of defence industry personnel dealing in sensitive military technology.

  • The Soggies have finally won: Cap’n Crunch is quietly sailing into retirement.

    Long derided by health experts for its high sugar content – a single serving contains 12 grams – the cereal is no longer being actively marketed by Quaker, DailyFinance reports. It appears parent company PepsiCo is forcing the good Cap’n to walk the plank.

    Cap’n Crunch was once the No. 1 breakfast cereal, but pressure from the White House and health activists is having an effect on how PepsiCo and other food companies peddle their products to kids. Sales of the cereal were down 6.8 percent in 2010.

  • Indications are that it was part of a series worshipped by ancient Mayan cultures in what is now Mexico – where, legend has it, the skulls are vital to stop the world ending next year.
  • Pilots on an Alaska Airlines flight locked down the cockpit and alerted authorities after three passengers conducted an elaborate Orthodox Jewish prayer ritual during their Los Angeles-bound flight.

    Airline spokeswoman Bobbie Egan says the crew of Flight 241 from Mexico City became alarmed Sunday after the men began the tefillin ritual, which involves tying leather straps and small wooden boxes to the body.

  • With some wildly inappropriate tweets, the quack has been silenced.

    Comedian Gilbert Gottfried sent out a slate of offensive twitter missives about the tragic Japanese earthquake and tsunami, and instead of drawing laughs, it cost him his job. The longtime voice of the iconic Aflac Duck, Gottfried was fired by the insurance company on Monday, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

  • A Facebook photo of a stolen 3 carat diamond ring recently helped police solve a jewelry theft. After rings and other items valued at more than $16,000 were taken from a home on Saturday, a friend of the victim’s roommate saw one of the items on the social network.

    20-year-old Crystal Yamnitzky captioned the photo with the following message: “Look what Robby gave me I love him so much,” in reference to her 21-year-old boyfriend Robert Driscoll. Yamnitzky’s cousin saw the post and told some friends, who alerted police. Both Yamnitzky and Driscoll have been charged in the case.

  • Mother sought appellate review of the lower court’s order that awarded primary physical custody of her daughter to the child’s father. The mother argued, among other things, that the court improperly considered Facebook photos showing her drinking. This was not good because her psychologist had testified that alcohol would have an adverse effect on the medication she was taking for bipolar disorder.
    The court rejected the mother’s assertion that the photos should not be considered as evidence. She argued that because Facebook allows anyone to post pictures and then “tag” or identify the people in the pictures, she never gave permission for the photographs to be published in this manner. The court held that “[t]here is nothing within the law that requires [one’s] permission when someone takes a picture and posts it on a Facebook page. There is nothing that requires [one’s] permission when she [is] “tagged” or identified as a person in those pictures.”
  • MAKE UP a name, snap a mug shot in front of a blue towel and send it to China with $200. Abracadabra, you’re 21.

    The China-based website www.idchief.com sells IDs that look a lot like Pennsylvania and New Jersey driver’s licenses. And police, government agencies and bar owners in both states are seeing red.

  • A Chicago dance team that performed in straitjackets last month has drawn criticism from a mental health advocate who said the outfits displayed insensitivity toward people with mental disorders.
  • It should have been an alluring photoshoot between two of nature’s beautiful creatures as a model wrapped herself in a snake.

    But surgically enhanced Israeli model Orit Fox got more than she bargained for when the massive boa constrictor took objection to her over familiarity and reacted by biting into her breast.

    However, it was the snake who came off worse because, while Ms Fox need a tetanus shot in hospital, the reptile later died from silicone poisoning.

  • How much does it take to feel wealthy these days? For many millionaires, it’s about $7.5 million, according to a survey by Fidelity Investments.
  • In an experiment, 41% of Facebook users were willing to divulge highly personal information to a complete stranger. This according to IT security firm Sophos, which invited 200 randomly selected Facebookers to befriend a bogus Facebook user named “Freddi Staur” (an anagram of “ID Fraudster”). Of those queried, 87 responded to the invitation, among them 82 people whose profiles included personal information such as their email address, date of birth, address or phone number. In total:

    * 72% of respondents divulged one or more email address
    * 84% listed their full date of birth
    * 87% provided details about their education or workplace
    * 78% listed their current address or location
    * 23% listed their current phone number
    * 26% provided their instant-messaging screen name

  • Though blogger John (Johnny Northside) Hoff told the truth when he linked ex-community leader Jerry Moore to a high-profile mortgage fraud, the scathing blog post that got Moore fired justifies $60,000 in damages, a Hennepin County jury decided Friday.
  • An American working for a covert U.S. program in Cuba was sentenced Saturday to 15 years in prison in the island, the Cuban government said, a verdict that promises to further disrupt relations between the two countries.

    Alan Gross, 61, worked as a contractor for a USAID program that secretly provided technology like computers and communications equipment to encourage democratic reforms. He was arrested in late 2009 and accused of aiding Cuban “subversives” and working to overthrow the government. Prosecutors had originally asked for a 20-year sentence.

  • At the 40-year-old Fukushima Daiichi unit 1, where an explosion Saturday destroyed a building housing the reactor, the spent fuel pool, in accordance with General Electric’s design, is placed above the reactor. Tokyo Electric said it was trying to figure out how to maintain water levels in the pools, indicating that the normal safety systems there had failed, too. Failure to keep adequate water levels in a pool would lead to a catastrophic fire, said nuclear experts, some of whom think that unit 1’s pool may now be outside.

    “That would be like Chernobyl on steroids,” said Arnie Gundersen, a nuclear engineer at Fairewinds Associates and a member of the public oversight panel for the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant, which is identical to the Fukushima Daiichi unit 1.

  • A Swedish company called Promessa has come up with a crazy new way of handling the remains of the deceased, and it’s straight out of science fiction. First, a body is chilled down to 18 degrees Celsius. Then it’s entirely submerged in liquid nitrogen, which freezes it solid, and makes it brittle enough that it can be shattered and pulverized into dust using high power sound waves. Next, the dust (which is still about the same mass as the body was) is exposed to a vacuum which boils off all the moisture contained in the dust, reducing its mass by 70% or so. Lastly, all of the inorganic stuff that may be left over is removed with an electromagnet, and the dust is placed in a coffin made of corn starch, all ready for a shallow burial that’ll turn everything into compost within a year.
  • There is a worse problem though. Probably in an effort to keep the problem of nuclear waste hidden from the public, these plants feature huge pools of water up in the higher level of the containment building above the reactors, which hold the spent fuel rods from the reactor. These rods are still “hot” but besides the uranium fuel pellets, they also contain the highly radioactive and potentially biologically active decay products of the fission process–particularly radioactive Cesium 137, Iodine 131 and Strontium 90. (Some of GE’s plants in the US feature this same design. The two GE Peach Bottom reactors near me, for example, each have two spent fuel tanks sitting above their reactors.)
  • “We are on the brink. We are now facing the worst-case scenario,” said Hiroaki Koide, a senior reactor engineering specialist at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. “We can assume that the containment vessel at Reactor No. 2 is already breached. If there is heavy melting inside the reactor, large amounts of radiation will most definitely be released.”

    Another executive said the chain of events at Daiichi suggested that it would be difficult to maintain emergency seawater cooling operations for an extended period if the containment vessel at one reactor had been compromised because radiation levels could threaten the health of workers nearby.

  • The workers are performing what have been described as heroic tasks, like using fire equipment to pump seawater into the three failing reactors to keep the nuclear fuel from melting down and fighting the fire at a fourth reactor.

    They are operating in places that have been contaminated by radioactive isotopes from all four reactors. Technicians who have not been evacuated face an escalating exposure, and will have to be replaced if the fight is to go on.

    “If they exceed a certain amount, they can’t go back in for a day or a week or longer,” said Dr. Lew Pepper, a professor at the Boston University School of Public Health who has studied the effects of radiation on nuclear weapons workers. And the pool of available replacements is finite, he said: “What do you do? You don’t have a lot of people who can do this work.”

  • “So far, although I see a link to this site from NSE, I don’t see any discussion of it. And frankly, Mr/MS mitnse, as far as I can tell you’re actually Ismail Subbiah, graphic designer occasionally on contract to MIT. The links between Siemens AG, Dr Oethman, Barry Brook, and MIT/LAI (which has cleverly been avoided – lets do bring that up, shall we?) suggest that no matter why the article was written in the first place, it’s become a major piece of disinformation masquerading falsely as academic opinion.”
  • Stanley was a core figure in the drug scene that underpinned hippie culture, producing an estimated one pound of pure LSD – enough for roughly five million trips.

    His pioneering role made the name “Owsley,” a popular slang term for the drug.

    Stanley stood firm in his belief that the drug was beneficial to society, despite serving two years in prison in the early 1970s.

    “I wound up doing time for something I should have been rewarded for,” he told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2007. “What I did was a community service.”

    Stanley was also a skilled audio technician who worked with The Dead creating their legendary sound system. Stanley inspired the band’s bear logo – which became a fixture on the back of Volkswagen buses for decades.

  • Owsley “Bear” Stanley, who fuelled the 1960s flower power generation with LSD and worked closely with the Grateful Dead, has been remembered as a man of “enormous influence”.

    Stanley worked as a sound engineer for the band and is remembered for the millions of LSD doses he manufactured at his lab in San Francisco, which helped to kick off the psychedelic era.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under Culture, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on March 15, 2011

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Digital Devilry

    • How much energy you use — and when you use it — can reveal surprisingly detailed information about your daily life. This wasn’t true when energy usage was only measured once a month. But with shorter intervals and more frequent metering, the picture of your home life is remarkably clear. An executive with Siemens Energy recently told the Smart Grids and Cleanpower conference in Britain, “We, Siemens, have the technology to record it (energy consumption) every minute, second, microsecond, more or less live…From that we can infer how many people are in the house, what they do, whether they’re upstairs, downstairs, do you have a dog, when do you habitually get up, when did you get up this morning, when do you have a shower: masses of private data.” It’s a virtual window into the home. The Smart Grid Interoperability Panel–Cyber Security Working Group recently issued a report on “Privacy and the Smart Grid” that covered these issues in depth.
    • It’s a good news/bad news situation for believers in the 2012 Mayan apocalypse. The good news is that the Mayan “Long Count” calendar may not end on Dec. 21, 2012 (and, by extension, the world may not end along with it). The bad news for prophecy believers? If the calendar doesn’t end in December 2012, no one knows when it actually will — or if it has already.

    Submit Links:
    SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

    File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death