straphanger | SeMeN SPeRmS SuPeR SiTe

Hot In The Pants

  • In the video, the woman pushing the stroller gets into an argument as the train pulls into a station. During the confrontation, which quickly becomes physical, the baby’s stroller rolls onto the subway platform.

    As the fight continues, horrified straphangers attempt to break up the fight as well as bring the baby’s disappearance to the woman’s attention.

    After the fight is broken up, the woman with the child walks off the train and pushes the stroller, baby in tow, along the platform as the other woman continues to shout from the subway car.

  • Police are investigating after raunchy videos of teenagers partying on a school bus bound for a southern Ontario beach were posted to the Internet.The videos show dozens of teens — decked out in sunglasses, tank tops and shorts — dancing in the isles of a yellow school bus en route to Grand Bend, Ont., while music blares in the background.
    Some of the revellers can be seen holding beer bottles while other teens film the out-of-control scene with their cellphones.
    In one video, two young girls kiss as the other partiers cheer them on.
    One female lies on top of a male and gyrates her hips as teens shriek with joy.
    But the party was interrupted after police, tipped off by a Facebook page promoting the summer party, stopped the bus on route to the Lake Huron beach last Friday.
  • A 17-year-old boy ‘brutally and mercilessly’ killed his parents before having a house party while their bodies were still inside a bedroom, police said.

    Tyler Hadley, of Port St Lucie, Florida, allegedly beat his school teacher mother Mary-Jo and father Blake to death with a hammer, which was found lying between their bodies.

    The teen is thought to have killed his parents before hosting a party for 40 to 60 people on Saturday night after posting invitations on Facebook.

  • An arrest warrant has been issued for the manager of a Marietta McDonald’s after she punched a mother of two autistic boys in the face, Marietta police said.
  • The group’s actions have become intolerable, Steven Chabinsky, deputy assistant FBI director, said in an interview with NPR.

    “We want to send a message that chaos on the Internet is unacceptable,” Chabinsky said. “[Even if] hackers can be believed to have social causes, it’s entirely unacceptable to break into websites and commit unlawful acts.”

    The group followed up with a statement to the FBI and Chabinsky, with a list of things it deems unacceptable: “Governments lying to their citizens and inducing fear and terror to keep them in control … corporations aiding and conspiring with said governments … lobby conglomerates who only follow their agenda to push the profits higher.”

  • If you thought the outrage over the phone-hacking scandal was starting to die down, The Times of London, one of Rupert Murdoch’s own papers, may have brought it straight back into the spotlight.

    An editorial cartoon published Thursday morning in the paper with the title “Priorities” shows starving people in Somalia saying “We’ve had a bellyful of phone-hacking … ” It’s causing quite a firestorm on Twitter. You can access the newspaper’s site here, but you won’t be able to get past the pay wall without a subscription. The paper has not yet returned calls for comment.

  • The grave condition of a Queens teenager hit in a chain-reaction wreck was overshadowed by the presence of an NBA celebrity, witnesses said Tuesday.

    As 15-year-old Awsaf Islam lay dying on a Sunnyside street last Thursday, bystanders focused on Lakers star Lamar Odom, who emerged unscathed from one of the wrecked cars, they said.

    “Everybody was paying attention to him. Nobody cared about the kid,” said Adolfo Ramirez, 13, who witnessed the crash.

    “It was messed up,” witness Naldo Vasquez, 15, said. “They got excited and were asking to take photos with him.”

  • Ships of the future may be able to move through the water without a creating a wake. That is according to a pair of physicists in the US, who have proposed a new type of material that lets water flow around an object as if it were not there at all. The design, which has yet to be built, could boost the energy efficiency of ships and submarines – and even prevent them from being detected. “The main function of [our] structure is to prevent fluid flowing around an object from ‘feeling’ that object,” says Yaroslav Urzhumov of Duke University.
  • Artificial intelligence has been the inspiration for countless books and movies, as well as the aspiration of countless scientists and engineers. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have now taken a major step toward creating artificial intelligence — not in a robot or a silicon chip, but in a test tube. The researchers are the first to have made an artificial neural network out of DNA, creating a circuit of interacting molecules that can recall memories based on incomplete patterns, just as a brain can.
  • Workmen scoured “HAMAD” into the sand on the orders of Abu Dhabi’s Sheikh Hamad Bin Hamdan Al Nahyan.

    The name is two miles across — with letters a kilometre high. It is so huge that the “H”, the first “A” and part of the “M” have been made into waterways.

    The mega-rich sheikh, 63 — a member of the ruling family of Abu Dhabi — in the oil-rich United Arab Emirates — boasts a £14billion fortune that is second only to the Saudi king’s.

  • Seen any walnuts in your medicine cabinet lately? According to the Food and Drug Administration, that is precisely where you should find them. Because Diamond Foods made truthful claims about the health benefits of consuming walnuts that the FDA didn’t approve, it sent the company a letter declaring, “Your walnut products are drugs” — and “new drugs” at that — and, therefore, “they may not legally be marketed … in the United States without an approved new drug application.” The agency even threatened Diamond with “seizure” if it failed to comply.
  • The terrorists at the Department of Homeland Enslavement otherwise known by the average American zombie as the Department of Homeland Security are now saying that violent extremists have obtained insider positions in the utility sector and could be preparing to unleash a variety of terrorist attacks on key infrastructure. This is a complete and total fabrication from an organization that is merely trying to justify its own existence by spreading absurdly ridiculous propaganda. It is a fact that the Department of Homeland Security would never issue a report stating that the terror threat is low because questions would be raised as to why so much money is being used to finance their operations. As a result, they have to spread fear of terrorism no matter how ridiculous the premise in order to ensure that their organization does not receive cuts in funding.
  • What $114,500,000,000,000 visually looks like in 100 dollar bills
  • The U.S. Federal Reserve gave out $16.1 trillion in emergency loans to U.S. and foreign financial institutions between Dec. 1, 2007 and July 21, 2010, according to figures produced by the government’s first-ever audit of the central bank.

    Last year, the gross domestic product of the entire U.S. economy was $14.5 trillion.

  • Milagros Garcia is an alleged Alien and Human inter-species hybrid. The blood DNA from this Puerto Rican woman has yielded analyses so unusual and interesting that the physician involved is now interested in meeting the subject for further study. The DNA is possible in humans but is very rare.

    Ms. Garcia claims that she is the offspring of an alien encounter. The Doctor is not interested in the UFO/ alien phenomena he wants answers as to why her DNA has such rare qualities.

  • This latest ad-campaign is a brilliant attempt to strike fear into the hearts and minds of the American Public. One will see the genius behind the psychological operation in the videos bellow.

    These videos are meant to scare the public into turning on the neighbors and other fellow countrymen. They also show white Americans as the terrorists rather then the usual Muslim patsies.

    Do we really need to be told to call 911 when seeing something that warrants the attention of law enforcement?

    The country is in dire straights when it comes to our debt. Should we really be pouring money down the drain to fund over the top ad-campaigns?

  • House Republicans proposed draft legislation last week that would let companies like Fox, AT&T and Verizon buy their way out of public interest obligations. Here’s how:

    Broadcasters, like Fox, can buy their way out of public interest obligations if they put spectrum licenses up for sale.
    Wireless companies, like AT&T and Verizon, can buy their way out of consumer protections if they buy this new spectrum.
    “Unlicensed spectrum” is on the auction block, selling off public airwaves and making us pay for future WiFi-like services.
    To make it worse, all of this is wrapped up in the debt ceiling debate, but won’t actually make a significant dent in the national debt.

  • It seems that the UK isn’t the only country at the centre of a phone hacking scandal.

    A spokesman for the Taliban has claimed that phones, email accounts and a website belonging to the group were hacked, and text messages distributed claiming that their reclusive Afghan leader Mullah Mohammed Omar had died from heart disease.

    The original SMS text messages were received from phone numbers belonging to Taliban spokemen Zabihullah Mujahid and Qari Yousuf, and read:

    “Spiritual Leader Mullah Mohammad Omar Mujahid has died. May Allah bless his soul.”

    Zabihullah Mujahid angrily denied the rumours that Mullah Omar, one of the world’s most wanted men, was dead, in an interview with Reuters:

    “This is the work of American intelligence, and we will take revenge on the telephone network providers.”

  • As the report put it, “The typical Internet user is more than twice as likely as others to feel that people can be trusted,” with regular Facebook users the most trusting of all. “A Facebook user who uses the site multiple times per day is 43% more likely than other Internet users and more than three times as likely as non-Internet users to feel that most people can be trusted.” What’s more, while the average American has two “discussion confidants”–people they discuss important matters with–Facebookers who log in several times a day average 9% more close ties.
  • The answer might depend on which media outlet you rely on.

    I read the headline at Democracy Now! on Friday:

    “Justice Dept Drops 99 of 101 Cases Against CIA for Abuse and Torture”

    The New York Times, on the other hand, offered a different sort of emphasis:

    “U.S. Widens Inquiries Into 2 Jail Deaths”

  • But were the site’s users all criminals hell-bent on destroying the movie industry? According to a report from Telepolis, a recent study found the reverse was true.

    The study, which was carried out by Society for Consumer Research (GfK), found that users of pirate sites including Kino.to did not fit the copyright lobby-painted stereotype of parasites who take and never give back.

    In fact, the study also found that Internet users treat these services as a preview, a kind of “try before you buy.”

    This, the survey claims, leads pirate site users to buy more DVDs, visit the cinema more often and on average spend more than their ‘honest’ counterparts at the box office.

    “The users often buy a ticket to the expensive weekend-days,” the report notes.

    In the past similar studies have revealed that the same is true for music. People who pirate a lot of music buy significantly more music than those who don’t.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under Music, SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 22, 2011

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Whomp That Sucker

  • Listen to an excerpt from “The Rise and Fall of Underground Comix in San Francisco and Beyond” read by author Jay Kinney
  • Yes, the event was “cool.” When was the last time you could tweet a president, with the (slim) potential for him to answer your questions?

    But there was a problem with the Twitter aspect of the town hall — it went in one direction, which goes against the point of Twitter. Not only did the President not type in his answers, they were much longer than the 140 characters Twitterers use to communicate.

  • Dr. Saper estimates that 15% to 20% of them are faking—or at least, aren’t as incapacitated as they say. Some are dependent on painkillers or seeking to resell them, he says. Some want a doctor to certify that they’ll never be able to work again and deserve disability payments. Some, he thinks, don’t really want to get well because they subconsciously find power in their pain.
  • Police noticed the man filming the shooting and an officer jumped into his truck, and put a pistol to his head, Benoit said. The video shows officers crowding around Herisse’s vehicle before opening fire, followed by indistinguishable yelling at onlookers, including Benoit, to stop filming.

    The cop yelled: “Wanna be a [expletive] paparazzi?” Benoit recounted in a TV interview.

    “My phone was smashed, he stepped on it, handcuffed me,” the 35-year-old car stereo technician told CNN.
    Despite his phone being destroyed, Benoit was able to save the footage by taking the memory card out of the device and putting it in his mouth before handing it over to police, he said, adding that officers smashed several other cameras in the chaos which followed the shooting.

  • The well-dressed man in dark glasses didn’t attract a second glance when he walked into a gallery near Union Square on Tuesday.

    And soon he was gone, after grabbing a drawing by Pablo Picasso that was being offered for more than $200,000, and vanishing in a waiting taxicab, San Francisco police said.

  • In this week’s crazy NYC subway video series, a woman, nude from the waist down, sets up a wash station on the blue bench of a subway car and proceeds to take a camping-style shower.

    With water and suds pooling on the subway car floor, the woman deliberately cleans herself in a 3-part YouTube video uploaded by a straphanger. It’s anyone’s guess what happens in the second and third videos, as they have been removed from YouTube for violating the policy on nudity or sexual content. See Video Below (Warning NSFW):

  • An Internet-based treasure hunt, known as geocaching, caused a bomb scare in West Yorkshire after a local cafe owner reported a suspicious package.

    The hidden box was blown up in a controlled explosion after being placed near the cafe, which was forced to be shut down for two hours.

    Geocaching participants use GPS and other mobile devices to hide and locate caches around the world. The caches typically contain a logbook to sign or small item to trade.

  • Alexander Shulgin is the world’s foremost “psychonaut.” The 82-year-old chemist has not only created more of the 300 known consciousness-altering (or psychoactive) compounds than anyone living or dead, he has, by his own account, sampled somewhere between 200 and 250 of them himself—most of them cooked up in the musty lab behind his home in the hills east of Berkeley, Calif., where he has shared many a chemical voyage with his wife of 26 years, Ann.

    “I take them myself because I am interested in their activity in the human mind. How would you test that in a rat or mouse?” says Shulgin, known to friends as Sasha.

    He has paid the price for his avocation. Some of his creations have induced uncontrollable vomiting, paralysis and the feeling that his bones were melting, among other terrors.

  • Story of a crazy show I was at that became a riot. Best show EVER!
  • COVENTRY woman Samantha Haworth is lucky to be alive after a gastric band made her stomach “explode”.

    Samantha had the band fitted when her weight soared to 28 stone, putting her health at risk.

    Two years later, an incredibly rare complication meant the band ‘slipped’ inside her, leaving the 25- year-old from Walsgrave in agony.

    But she mistook her deadly symptoms for heartburn.

    Without Samantha knowing, her gastric band had moved and turned septic. When her stomach could not cope any more it burst.

  • The recent class-action lawsuit brought against Taco Bell raised questions about the quality of food many Americans eat each day.

    Chief among those concerns is the use of cellulose (read: wood pulp), an extender whose use in a roster of food products, from crackers and ice creams to puddings and baked goods, is now being exposed. What you’re actually paying for — and consuming — may be surprising.

  • DHS is gearing up with just about every terror gadget and detection system possible to protect us from a pretty much nonexistent threat in the United States.

    Now they are testing roadside radiation trackers and sporting event radiation trackers in the next phase to screen the populace.

  • TeaMp0isoN claim to expose the personal details of Anonymous & Lulzsec via a tweet. They posted a pastie link which contains the details of various Lulzsec members and Anonymous.
  • Gilbert had high expectations of America’s youngsters, and with such he tried to help the future engineers, doctors and leaders by providing toys worthy of their imaginations. As the inventor of the Erector Set, and seeing its commercial appeal, the he and his company set a higher goal. They became the leading manufacturer of scientific toys (chemistry sets) and construction sets (Erector), all of which gained wide acclaim at the retail level. Interested in the joy of science more than remuneration, however, Gilbert created the Atomic Energy Lab U-238 – with the help of MIT’s able faculty. The toy was made to de-mystify the perils of nuclear energy and to encourage the understanding of chemistry, physics and nuclear science – ultimately helping kids (and adults) become more open to the possibilities these disciplines offer. This educational composite, which was marketed during 1950-51, sold for $49.50 – a very high price for a toy set, even by today’s standard.
  • The mysterious odor coming from Room 131 of the Lincoln Motel 6 last week turned out to be more than rotten food or a clogged toilet.

    The entire room was covered with feces, Lincoln Police Capt. David Beggs said.

    Police are looking for the person responsible for the vandalism, which caused about $3,500 damage to the hotel room. Employees reported the incident Saturday.

    After guests complained of an odor, employees discovered the room, including the curtains, table and counter, was covered with feces. Surrounding rooms had to be vacated, Beggs said.

    The last occupant, who stayed in the room June 22-29, checked in with three cats. But those who saw the room said some of the feces appeared to be too big to be from a cat, Beggs said.

Submit Links:
SeMeNSPeRmS@SeMeNSPeRmS.com

File under SeMeN SPeRmS BLArRrG, SeMeN SPeRmS Links 'o Death, Sex

Conjured by o~ SeMeN SPeRmS ~o on July 7, 2011

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,